1995

Shakespeare at Kalamazoo; ACH/ALLC '95 Program

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0485.  Thursday, 15 June 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Bernice W. Kliman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jun 1995 15:56:17 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Shakespeare at Kalamazoo
 
(2)     From:   Eric Dahlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jun 95 12:31:27 PDT
        Subj:   ACH/ALLC '95 program
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bernice W. Kliman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jun 1995 15:56:17 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Shakespeare at Kalamazoo
 
[Note: There were a few errors in the original posting that have been corrected
here. --HMC]
 
                            Call for Papers
 
                     SHAKESPEARE  AT  KALAMAZOO
 
                Thirty-first International Congress on Medieval Studies
                        Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 2-6, 1996
 
SHAKESPEARE AT KALAMAZOO has organized programs at the International Congress
since 1989.  Two sessions have been proposed for the 31st Congress in 1995,
both devoted to papers specifically relating Shakespeare to the broader canvas
of cultural history.
 
Session 1:  Shakespeare in the Tradition of the Performing Arts
 
Session 2:  Shakespeare and Cultural Continuity
 
Papers for Session 1 should explore evidence in Shakespeare's play of medieval
ideas of theater and of medieval practices and dramaturgical conventions.
Papers for Session 2 should focus on the representation in Shakespeare's play
of late medieval and early modern cultural trends. Papers are invited from
scholars in teh fields of art history, music, folklore, history, philosophy,
theater history, the history fo science, law, and more--as well as literature,
both English and continental.
 
The Congress on Medieval Studies provides a unique milue for an exchange of
insights on Shakespeare's place in the continuum of culture.
 
For further information, please contact 1996 program organizer Michael Shapiro,
208 English Building, University of Illinois, 608 South Wright St., Urbana, IL
61801, FAX 217-333-4321/e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
He will accept abstracts for papers that can be delivered in 20 minutes.
Abstracts must be submitted by 1 Sept 1995
 
Note: please cross-post this announcement on any other relevant lists.
 
Thank you very much
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Eric Dahlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jun 95 12:31:27 PDT
Subject:        ACH/ALLC '95 program
 
********************************************************************
 
ACH/ALLC '95, July 11-15, 1995
University of California, Santa Barbara
=======================================
Tentative Program (subject to change)
 
Sunday, July 9
--------------
 1 pm onward           dormitory check-in               Anacapa Hall
 
Monday, July 10
---------------
 1 pm onward           dormitory check-in               Anacapa Hall
 8  to 10 am           registration for TEI workshop    Anacapa Hall
 9 am to 4 pm          TEI Workshop                Microcomputer Lab
 
Tuesday, July 11
----------------
 9 am onward           dormitory check-in               Anacapa Hall
 8 to 10 am            ALLC Committee                   Anacapa Hall
10 am to 12 noon       ACH Executive Council            Anacapa Hall
 1 to 4 pm             tour of Santa Barbara        [departing from]
 2 to 7 pm             registration                     Anacapa Hall
 5:30 pm               opening session                    [location]
  Welcome:
    Nancy Ide, President, ACH; Susan Hockey, Chairman, ALLC
  Opening address:
    Walter E. Massey, Provost and Senior Vice President,
    Academic Affairs, University of California
      "Surfing the Net: What New Technologies Mean for Education"
 
 7:00 pm               reception                        Lagoon Patio
 8:00 pm               banquet                           Corwin Room
 
Wednesday, July 12
------------------
 8 am to 3 pm          registration                     Corwin Lobby
 9 to 10:30 am         Plenary Session                   Corwin West
  Keynote address:
    Stanley Katz, President, The American Council of
    Learned  Societies
    "Constructing the Humanities Community for the Digital Age"
 
10:30 to 11 am         coffee break                       [location]
11 am to 5:30 pm       software demonstrations,          Corwin East
                       posters, book and
                       vendor displays
 
11 am to 12:30 pm      Sessions 1-A and 1-B
 
Session 1-A, 11 am to 12:30 pm                            [location]
Computational lexicons, corpora
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  Mining COMLEX for Syntactic Data: An On-line Dictionary as a
  Resource for Research in Syntax for Linguists at Large
     Catherine Macleod, Adam Meyers, and Ralph Grishman,
     New York University
 
  Constructing A Knowledge Base for Describing the
  General Semantics of Verbs
     Sophie Daubeze, IRIT-CNRS, URACOM Parc Technologique du canal;
     Patrick Saint-Dizier, IRIT-CNRS; Palmira Marrafa
 
  The Corpus and the Citation Archive--Peaceful Coexistence Between
  the Best and the Good?
     Christian-Emil Ore, University of Oslo
 
Session 1-B, 11 am to 12:30 pm                            [location]
Stylistics
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  Mapping the "Other Harmony" of Prose: A Computer Analysis of John
  Dryden's Prose Style
     Mary Mallery, The Center for Electronic Texts in the Humanities
 
  Neural Network Applications in Stylometry: The Federalist Papers
     F. J. Tweedie, S. Singh, and D.I. Holmes, University of the
     West of England, Bristol
 
  Language and Style in Golding's _The Inheritors_: An Eclectic,
  Computer-Assisted Approach
     David L. Hoover, New York University
 
12:30 to 2 pm          lunch
 
 2 to 3:30 pm           Sessions 2-A and 2-B
 
Session 2-A, 2 to 3:30 pm                                 [location]
Panel
Chair: Nancy Ide, Vassar College
 
  The Information Superhighway and the Humanities:
  Will Our Needs Be Met?
     Charles Henry, Vassar College; Nancy Ide, Vassar College;
     Stanley Katz, The American Council of Learned Societies;
     Elli Mylonas, Brown University
 
Session 2-B, 2 to 3:30 pm                                 [location]
Linguistics (software)
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  Behind the Scenes: Building a Tool for
  Verb Classification in French
     Rachel Panckhurst, Universite Paul Valery, Montpellier III
 
  From Linguistic Resources to Applications With the ZStation:
  A New Approach to Linguistic Engineering in Research and Teaching
     Henri C. Zingle, LILLA, University of Nice
 
  The Linguistic Postprocessor of SCRIPT: A System for the
  Recognition of Handwritten Input Using Linguistic and
  Statistical Filter Mechanisms as well as a Crossword Lexicon
     Bettina Harriehausen-Muhlbauer, IBM Germany, Science Center
 
 3:30 to 4 pm          coffee break                       [location]
 
 4 to 5:30 pm          Sessions 3-A, 3-B, and 3-C
 
Session 3-A, 4 to 5:30 pm                                 [location]
Panel
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  Collaboration Between Humanities Scholars and
  Computer Professionals
     John Unsworth (moderator), John Dobbins, Susan Gants, Jerome
     McGann, and Thornton Staples, Institute for Advanced Technology
     in the Humanities(IATH), University of Virginia
 
Session 3-B, 4 to 5:30 pm                                 [location]
Encoding issues
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  You Can't Always Get What You Want: Deep Encoding of
  Manuscripts and the Limits of Retrieval
     Michael Neuman, Georgetown University
 
  Using the TEI to Encode Textual Variations:
  Some Practical Considerations
     Gregory Murphy, The Center for Electronic Texts in the
     Humanities
 
  Implementing the TEI's Feature-Structure Markup by
  Direct Mapping to the Objects and Attributes of an
  Object-Oriented Database System
     Gary F. Simons, Summer Institute of Linguistics
 
Session 3-C, 4 to 5:30 pm
UCSB Demonstrations [to be announced]
 
 6 pm                  ACH open meeting                   [location]
 8 pm                  Text Encoding Initiative (TEI)     [location]
                       open session
 
 
Thursday, July 13
-----------------
 9 am to 5:30 pm       software demonstrations,          Corwin East
                       posters, book and
                       vendor displays
 
 9 to 10:30 am         Sessions 4-A and 4-B
 
Session 4-A, 9 to 10:30 am                                [location]
Panel
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  The Information Superhighway and the Humanities:
  An International Perspective
     Jane Rosenberg, NEH; [other panelists and affiliations]
 
Session 4-B, 9 to 10:30 am                                [location]
Computer Assisted Instruction
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  Architext: A Hypertext Application for
  Architectural History Instruction
     Mark R. Petersen, Clarkson University
 
  Teaching Critical Thinking with Interactive Courseware:
  An Experiment in Evaluation
     Jill LeBlanc and Geoffrey M. Rockwell, McMaster University
 
  Watching Scepticism: Computer Assisted Visualization and
  Hume's _Dialogues_
     Geoffrey M. Rockwell, McMaster University; John Bradley,
     University of Toronto
 
10:30 to 11 am        coffee break                        [location]
 
11 am to 12:30 pm     Sessions 5-A and 5-B
 
Session 5-A, 11 am to 12:30 pm                            [location]
Internet, World Wide Web, Hypertext
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  TACT & WWW: Argument and Evidence on the Internet
     John D. Bradley, University of Toronto; Geoffrey M. Rockwell,
     McMaster University
 
  Art History and the Internet
     Michael Greenhalgh, Australian National University
 
  The Labyrinth, the World Wide Web, and the Development of
  Disciplinary Servers in the Humanities
     Deborah Everhart and Martin Irvine, Georgetown University
 
 
Session 5-B, 11 am to 12:30 pm                            [location]
Annotation
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  Man-Machine Cooperation in Syntactic Annotation
     Hans van Halteren, University of Nijmegen
 
  Man vs. Machine--Which is the Most Reliable Annotator?
     Gunnel Kallgren, Stockholm University
 
  Standards in Morphosyntax: Towards a Ready-to-Use Package
     Nicoletta Calzolari and Monica Monachini, Istituto di
     Linguistica Computazionale (CNR), Pisa
 
12:30 to 2 pm          lunch
 
 2 pm to 3:30 pm, Sessions 6-A and 6-B
 
Session 6-A, 2 pm to 3:30 pm                              [location]
Project session
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  ACCORD: a New Approach to Digital Resource Development
  Using the Testbed Method
     Mary Keeler, University of Washington; Christian Kloesel,
     Indiana University
 
  Yearning to be Hypertext: The Cornell Wordsworth and
  the Limits of the Codex
     Bruce Graver, Providence College
 
  The Shakespeare Multimedia Project:
  An Exploration in Constructivist Pedagogy
     Leslie D. Harris, Susquehanna University
 
Session 6-B, 2 pm to 3:30 pm                              [location]
Text Databases
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  Problems of Multidatabase Construction for
  Linguistic and Literary Research
     Richard Giordano and Carole Goble, University of Manchester;
     Gunnel Kallgren, Stockholm University
 
  A Data Architecture for Multi-lingual Linguistic Corpora
     Nancy Ide, Vassar College; Jean Veronis, Laboratoire Parole et
     Langage, CNRS, Aix-en-Provence; David Durand, Boston University
 
  On the Text Based Database Systems for Public Service
     Shoichiro Hara and Hisashi Yasunaga, National Institute of
     Japanese Literature
 
 3:30 to 4 pm          coffee break                       [location]
 
 4 to 5:30 pm, Sessions 7-A, 7-B, and 7-C
 
Session 7-A, 4 to 5:30 pm                                 [location]
Panel
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  Model Editions Partnership Panel
     David R. Chesnutt, University of South Carolina; Ann D. Gordon,
     Rutgers University; C. M. Sperberg-McQueen, University of
     Illinois at Chicago
 
Session 7-B, 4 to 5:30 pm                                 [location]
Translation, computational lexicography
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  The Terminology of Bioenergy: A Project in Progress
     Lisa Lena Opas, University of Joensuu
 
  LOCOLEX: The Translation Rolls Off Your Tongue
     Daniel Bauer, Fridirique Segond, and Annie Zaenen, RANK XEROX
     Research Centre
 
  Parallel Corpora, Translation Equivalence and
  Contrastive Linguistics
     Raphael Salkie, University of Brighton
 
Session 7-C, 4 to 5:30 pm
UCSB Demonstrations [to be announced]
 
 6 pm                  ALLC open meeting                  [location]
 
 
Friday, July 14
---------------
 9 am to 5:30 pm       software demonstrations,           [location]
                       posters, book and
                       vendor displays
 
 9 to 10:30 am, Sessions 8-A and 8-B
 
Session 8-A, 9 to 10:30 am                               [location]
Special session: Humanities Computing Support
Chair: Espen Ore, University of Bergen
 
  World Bank Support for the Development of Foreign Language
  Education at Lajos Kossuth University, Debrecen, Hungary
     Laszlo Hunyadi, Lajos Kossuth University
 
  Application of Computers in Language Training in the
  Post-Soviet Ukraine
     Peter I. Serdiukov, Kiev State Linguistic University
 
  Creating a Multi-Lingual Hypertext:
  A CSCW Project in the Humanities
     Catherine Scott, University of North London
 
Session 8-B, 9 to 10:30 am                               [location]
Word studies, statistics
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  Experiments in Word Creation
     Michael Levison and Greg Lessard, Queen's University, Kingston,
     Ontario
 
  A Multivariate Test for the Attribution of Authorship
     F.J. Tweedie, University of the West of England, Bristol;
     C. A. Donnelly, University of Edinburgh
 
  The Randomness Assumption in Word Frequency Statistics
     R. Harald Baayen, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics,
     Nijmegen, The Netherlands
 
10:30 to 11 am         coffee break                       [location]
 
11 am to 12:30 pm, Sessions 9-A and 9-B
 
Session 9-A, 11 am to 12:30 pm                            [location]
Panel
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  Electronic Resources for Literary Studies
     Kathryn Sutherland, Nottingham University; Lou Burnard and Alan
     Morrison, Oxford University Computing Services
 
Session 9-B, 11 am to 12:30 pm                            [location]
Corpus Linguistics
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  Perception Nouns in the Italian Reference Corpus:
  Argument Structure and Collocational Uses
     Adriana Roventini and Monica Monachini, Istituto di Linguistica
     Computazionale (CNR), Pisa
 
  Investigating Verbal Transitions with P.R.O.U.S.T.
     Tony Jappy, University of Perpignan
 
  A Corpus-Based Study of Nonfinite and
  Verbless Adverbial Clauses in English
     Magnus Ljung, Stockholm University
 
12:30 to 2 pm          lunch
 
 2 to 3:30 pm, Sessions 10-A and 10-B
 
Session 10-A, 2 to 3:30 pm                                [location]
Authorship attribution
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  Word-Type at "Sentence" Beginning and End: A Reliable
  Discriminator of Authorship of Latin Prose Texts?
     Bernard Frischer, University of California, Los Angeles
 
  Wordprinting Francis Bacon
     Noel B. Reynolds and John L. Hilton, Brigham Young University
 
  The "Federalist" Revisited: New Directions in
  Authorship Attribution
     David Holmes, University of the West of England, Bristol
 
Session 10-B, 2 to 3:30 pm                                [location]
Literature, Literary Theory
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  Categories, Theory, and Literary Texts
     Paul A. Fortier, University of Manitoba
 
  Tracing the Narrator: Parenthesis and Point-of-View in
  Joseph Conrad's _Heart of Darkness_.
     Thomas Rommel, University of Tuebingen
 
  The Perception of Biblical Texts in Modern Literature, Illustrated
  by the Lyric Poetry of Christine Busta
     Susanne Bucher-Gillmayr, University of Innsbruck, Austria
 
 3:30 to 4 pm          coffee break
 
 4 to 5 pm             Discussion Groups 1 and 2
 
Discussion Group 1, 4 to 5 pm                          [location]
 
  The Future of HUMANIST
     Willard McCarty, University of Toronto
     (discussion leader)
 
Discussion Group 2, 4 to 5 pm                          [location]
 
  Perspectives on the Need for Behavioral Change in
  the Humanities: Response to the Information Age
     Mary Keeler, University of Washington
     (discussion leader)
 
 6 pm                  beach barbecue                   Goleta Beach
 
 
Saturday, July 15
-----------------
 9 to 10:30 am         Sessions 11-A and 11-B
 
Session 11-A, 9 to 10:30 am                               [location]
Hypertext, Text Editing
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  Screen and Page: Some Questions of Design in Electronic Editions
     Michael Best, University of Victoria, British Columbia
 
  Translation Project for Vincent of Beauvais' _Speculum Naturale_
     Carol Everest, King's University College, Edmonton, Alberta;
     Caroline Falkner, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario;
     Kevin Roddy, University of California, Davis
 
  Text, Hypertext or Cybertext--A Typology of Textual Modes
  Using Correspondence Analysis
     Espen Aarseth, University of Bergen
 
 
Session 11-B, 9 to 10:30 am                               [location]
Linguistics, corpora
Chair: [name and affiliation]
 
  Maestro2: An Object-Oriented Approach to
  Structured Linguistic Data
     Greg Lessard, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario;
     Colin Gajraj, Bell Northern Research, Ottawa;
     Ian Macleod, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario
 
  A Program for Aligning English and Norwegian Sentences
     Knut Hofland, The Norwegian Computing Centre for the Humanities
 
  Contractions in ARCHER: Register and Diachronic Change
     Joe Allen, University of Southern California
 
10:30 to 11 am         coffee break                       [location]
 
11 to 11:30am          closing session                    [location]
  Remarks:
    Nancy Ide, President, ACH; Susan Hockey, Chairman, ALLC;
    Espen Ore, ALLC, Local Organizer, ALLC/ACH '96,
    University of Bergen
 
12 noon to 1 pm        lunch
 
 1 to 5:30 pm          winery tour                  [departing from]
 
 
Demonstrations
--------------
(See separate schedule)
 
  Cinema Studies and Interactivity: A Multimedia Computer Model
     Robert Kolker, University of Maryland
 
  CoALA-An Intelligent System for Language Acquisition Combining
  Various Modern NLPTtechnologies
     Bettina Harriehausen-Muhlbauer, IBM Germany, Science Center
 
  SHAXICON--Mapping Shakespeare's "Rare Words" Across the Canon
     Don Foster, Vassar College
 
  Computerizing the Buddhist Scriptures
     Supachai Tangwongsan, Mahidol University Computing Center,
     Thailand
 
  ADMYTE, A Digital Archive of Spanish Manuscripts and Texts
     Charles Faulhaber, University of California, Berkeley
 
  SYNTPARSE, For Parsing English Texts
  SYNTCHECK, For Orthographical and Grammatical Spell-Checking of
    English Texts
  SOFTHESAURUS, An English Electronic Thesaurus
  LINGUATERM, A Multilingual (English, German, French, Spanish)
    Electronic Thesaurus of Linguistic Terminology
  GEOATLAS, A Multilingual (English, German, French, Italian)
    Electronic Thesaurus of Related Place Names
     Hristo Georgiev-Good, Good Language Software, Switzerland
 
  TUSTEP: A Scholarly Tool for Literary and Linguistic Analysis
     Winfried Bader, University of Tuebingen
 
  From Linguistic Resources to Applications with the ZStation:
  A New Approach to Linguistic Engineering in Research and Teaching
     Henri C. Zingle, LILLA, University of Nice
 
  OrigENov: Integration of Multimedia into the Teaching of
  Comparative Literature at Luton University
     Clementine Burnley, Barbara Heins, and Carlota Larrea,
     University of Luton
 
 
Posters
-------
(See separate schedule)
 
  Bringing SGML and TACT Together: sgml2tdb
     John Bradley, University of Toronto
 
  NEACH Guide to World Wide Web
     Heyward Ehrlich, Rutgers University
 
  The Provenance of Christian Doctrine, attributed to John Milton:
  An Evaluation of Alternative Statistical Methods
     F.J. Tweedie, University of the West of England, Bristol;
     T. Corns, University of Wales, Bangor; J. Hale, University of
     Otago; G. Campbell, University of Leicester; D.I. Holmes,
     University of the West of England, Bristol
 
  Developing an Electronic _Thesaurus Linguae Latinae_
     Ann F. DeVito, University of Saskatchewan, Consortium for
     Latin Lexicography
 
  A PROLOG Approach to Montesquieu
     Pauline Kra, Yeshiva University
 
  From Text to Test--Automatically: A Computer System for Deriving
  an English Language Test from a Text
     David Coniam, Chinese University of Hong Kong
 
  An Integrated Multimedia Network for Scholarly Discovery,
  Pedagogical Authoring, and Professional Presentation in the
  Field of Music
     Peter G. Otto, University of California, San Diego;
     Nancy B. Nuzzo and Michael Long, State University of
     New York at Buffalo
 
  APL-Simulation for I Ching Hexagrams' Order Explanation
     Pavel Luksha, Russia
 
  A Minimalist View on Binding and Language Acquisition
     Lily Grozeva, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences/Groningen
     University
 
  OrigENov: Integration of Multimedia into the Teaching of
  Comparative Literature at Luton University
     Clementine Burnley, Barbara Heins, and Carlota Larrea,
     University of Luton
 
********************************************************************

Re: Directing; Shakesbear; Newsgroup

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0484.  Thursday, 15 June 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Suzanne Westfall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jun 95 11:37 BST
        Subj:   RE: SHK 6.0451 Re: Elizabethan Directors and Directing
 
(2)     From:   David Jackson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jun 95 13:48:14 est
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0479  Re: William Shakesbear
 
(3)     From:   Marty Hyatt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 15 Jun 1995 11:39:49 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Usenet Shakespeare Newsgroup
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Suzanne Westfall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jun 95 11:37 BST
Subject: 6.0451 Re: Elizabethan Directors and Directing
Comment:        RE: SHK 6.0451 Re: Elizabethan Directors and Directing
 
In regard to directors, I know that William Cornish was paid for "his pageants"
at the court of Henry VII.  Many master of the Chapel were, I believe,
playwrights, designers, and most likely directors, especially for the children.
 Chamberlains in the Great Households were responsible for organizing
processions and revels, we know from precise orders in household books.
Whether the latter were more akin to contemporary stage managers than directors
is food for further thought.  As an actor and director myself, I know that the
actor frequently lacks an objective view of the play or the blocking, thought I
too have done the quick reblocking on tour routine.
 
The mechanics of acting (voice, blocking, gesture) are fairly easy for the
actors to handle.  The overall artistic unity, however, is another matter.
Directors, or very organic companies can manage this.  Whenever I've worked
without a director, I find that individual styles and interpretations rarely
mesh.  But maybe Shax's gang didn't care so much for unity of style anyway, and
went more for the star turn.
 
Suzanne Westfall
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Jackson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jun 95 13:48:14 est
Subject: 6.0479  Re: William Shakesbear
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0479  Re: William Shakesbear
 
If you strike out on the bear, and are still looking for something
Shakespearish, try the Bard-In-The-Box. I was given one for my birthday, and
it's certainly something worth having on one's desk. (For those unfamiliar with
it, it's a wooden box, about 6" on each side, from which pops a stuffed WS
holding a quill pen and a sonnet.) I think they run about $20.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marty Hyatt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 15 Jun 1995 11:39:49 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Usenet Shakespeare Newsgroup
 
Fellow SHAKSPERians:
 
There seems to be some confusion regarding the proposed Usenet newsgroup.  The
proposal has nothing to do with SHAKSPER, the mailing list, except that the
announcements regarding the group creation are being posted on SHAKSPER as a
courtesy for everyone's information, since the listmembers have an obvious
interest in Shakespeare.  The proposal is merely to create a new Usenet
newsgroup with Shakespeare as the topic of discussion, NOT to change the
SHAKSPER list in any way.
 
Please help the people that want the new Usenet group, even if you will never
take a look there yourself.  Some people cannot join mailing lists or cannot
join any more mailing lists without mailbox overload.  They can look in on a
Usenet group from time to time as they please without any mailbox consequences.
Some of us on the SHAKSPER list will also look in on the new group.
 
The Call for Votes will be posted soon.  Nobody is forced to vote. But it only
takes a one line email message to help create something useful for some fellow
Shakespeare lovers (hint hint!).
 
Martin Hyatt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Re: Miss-Begetting

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0482.  Thursday, 15 June 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Renee Pigeon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jun 1995 09:09:20 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0477  Re: Miss-Begetting
 
(2)     From:   Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jun 1995 13:22:21 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0477  Re: Miss-Begetting
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Renee Pigeon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jun 1995 09:09:20 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 6.0477  Re: Miss-Begetting
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0477  Re: Miss-Begetting
 
Couldn't Edmund have been born as a result of "simple fornication" if Edgar's
mother were dead (perhaps as a result of childbirth)?  I know Shakespeare
doesn't address this, but as long as we're speculating . . .
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jun 1995 13:22:21 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0477  Re: Miss-Begetting
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0477  Re: Miss-Begetting
 
Thanks to Robert Dennis and David Crosby for the gentleness of their
remonstrance, somewhat at odds it would seem with the prevailing mode of
response and debate on SHAKESPER but nevertheless appreciated by the person
being "corrected," namely me.  What is clear is that in my reference to
Renaissance "myths" about conception and, by implication, about girl children
and women, I was referring to the modern sense of the term "myth" as meaning
"an unfounded or false notion."  The importance of cultural mythic narratives
as encoders of value is, it seems to me obvious.  Indeed, I am working on a
book now on the idea of the Abraham/sacrifice story as one such central mythic
narrative for Jewish/Christian/Muslim cultures. Far be it from me to deny the
power of myth, but the idea that an energetic conception would more likely
produce a boy child seems to me to fall into the area of "false notion." Can
you explain how such an idea as this fits the category of mythic narrative that
you are rightly insisting on?  It is true that this "false notion" or "myth"
derives from assumptions that are sanctioned by cultural myths: such notions as
the idea that physical vigor and prowess are masculine, for instance. And there
are stories galore to support such assumptions. But there are also derivative
and secondary and FALSE ideas about people, gender, etc. that may be sanctioned
and explained by mythic narrative but are themselves merely "myths" in the
sense of untruths.  No? At least, if memory serves me correctly at this great
distance, my daughter was somewhat more vigorously conceived than my son.  But
there they both are!
 
Milla Riggio

Re: Was Shakespeare a Catholic?

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0483.  Thursday, 15 June 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Mack Carter <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jun 1995 10:51:33 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0475  Re: Was Shakespeare a Catholic?
 
(2)     From:   Daniel P. Tompkins <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jun 1995 14:00:27 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0475 Re: Was Shakespeare a Catholic?
 
(3)     From:   Stephanie Hughes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jun 1995 18:21:53 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0475  Re: Was Shakespeare a Catholic?
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mack Carter <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jun 1995 10:51:33 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 6.0475  Re: Was Shakespeare a Catholic?
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0475  Re: Was Shakespeare a Catholic?
 
It seems that Shakespeare had many men of the cloth in his comedies. I can't
see their use as a benefit to the Catholic Church and a sign of a person who
didn't question the "most highly charged religious centuries."
 
The the play "Loves Labor" Sir Nathaniel is noted as "a great feast of
languages and stolen the scraps."  Then in "As You Like It" Sir Oliver Martext
is called, "a most wicked Sir Oliver...a vile martext."  Then of course
everyone is blind in the "Twelfth Night" including the priest who you would
think could of had some wisdom by God to tell the difference.  Unfortunately,
that would change the play but, I don't recall Shakespeare saying it was a
young priest to be easily fooled.  I'm certain there are other characters that
don't meet with the desired view of a Catholic Church.  His views shown in the
character of Shylock the Jew of "The Merchant of Venice" are things the
Catholic Church wouldn't have wanted said at the time.  Remember, to the
Catholic Church Jews have been vermin bring diseases for the past 1900 years.
Who can read the "Merchant of Venice" and not say the Jew had a reason to hate
the Church.  This character had to be barb in the wheels of the Catholic
Church.
 
I will still call most of the conversation a bunch of "fluff" as people try to
make a man more Catholic by his work.  How many of us have our true religious
nature know by the people we work with?  Shouldn't they know better than a
person who reads our work?  I have friend that's Catholic, avoids using
Christ's name in vain but, if the truth be known he'll say Alla is equal in his
teachings and with him.  When my friend dies he's going to be known as a
Catholic and little else as the public sees him.
 
People seem to mis the fact plays of the time were written for the time as many
books are today.  Characters and scenes may hav even been deleted at times to
prevent conflict with the audience.  These are just needed tools of the theatre
world Shakespeare helped develop.
 
Was Shakespeare a Catholic?  He was from a Catholic family and baptised one,
that's public record.  The thing that makes him great is that he worked his
plays for his audience and with held the absolute answer to that question.  We
can't find anything of "matter" beyond a few bias scraps that he was Catholic,
so we turn to his "art" to try to learn it.  Yet, his art is sprayed with
different views that are all valid as Shylock's and his plays are noted to have
been made for the audience of the time giving the work a needed bias.  If the
views of Catholic Religion are of such importance to Shakespeare why would the
man make fun and point out its flaws to the public. In the end the only person
who knew Shakespeare's religious view was himself. I know only a fraction of my
friend's and I've know him for 6 years, we won't know a man's who lived
hundreds of years ago.  It's better to look at the political and social
structures Shakespeare wrote for and against to have a light understanding of
the man.  I don't think you will ever find concete matter from his art to his
religion and really isn't it a shame to label a person taking them away from
others who may think of him as like themselves. His works won't change and
there's no need for the label since the reasons of his writtings can be
explained for other reasons than religious ones.
 
Continue the discussion but, realize that if you label a person you make them
less than they might really be.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Daniel P. Tompkins <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jun 1995 14:00:27 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 6.0475 Re: Was Shakespeare a Catholic?
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0475 Re: Was Shakespeare a Catholic?
 
Maybe someone already mentioned this, but I think the father in Long Day's
Journey into Night insists that Shakespeare was an *Irish* Catholic.
 
Dan Tompkins
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephanie Hughes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jun 1995 18:21:53 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 6.0475  Re: Was Shakespeare a Catholic?
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0475  Re: Was Shakespeare a Catholic?
 
Yes, the author of the Shakespeare canon spent much of his life as a Catholic.
Having promised not to open questions of authorship, I will say no more. Anyone
who is interested in a fuller explanation can contact me directly at:
 
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
Stephanie Hughes

Re: Humor

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0481.  Thursday, 15 June 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Gareth Euridge <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 Jun 1995 09:14:11 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0472  Re: Humor
 
(2)     From:   David Jackson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 15 Jun 95 09:24:16 est
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0476  Re: Humor
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gareth Euridge <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 Jun 1995 09:14:11 -0400
Subject: 6.0472  Re: Humor
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0472  Re: Humor
 
Gabriel Egan's comments on Frankie Howard's suggestion that, to be a comic
today in England, requires a "university education" made me ponder, especially
as there seems such a rigid, though floppy, distinction in British comedy
between university wits and the likes of Benny Hill and Howard.  The crossovers
interest me most.
 
There is an episode in _Blackadder III_ in which Blackadder's servant Baldric
burns the only copy of Dr. Johnson's dictionary which the author had brought to
the prince for patronage.  Blackadder decides that the only way to avoid death
at the hands of Johnson and his cronies (Byron, Shelley, Keats, suitably high,
melodramatic, and syphilitic) is to re-write the dictionary himself over night.
 This is achieved, although Johnson ultimately does not care too much because
he hopes to make a fortune from _Edmund: A Butler's Tale_, a potboiler
sensation penned by Blackadder himself under a female pseudonym (Jane Austen
is, according to the show, a "great bearded Yorkshireman.")  Ultimately, both
of these great texts are lost to the flames.
 
The episode depends, clearly, on a pretty thorough knowledge of English lit.,
or else many of the jokes would be lost--"there's nothing artistic about
swanning around Italy in a baggy white shirt trying to get laid," and I imagine
that anyone without a BA in English would be for the most part adrift.  Yet
this series enjoyed great popular acclaim, at least in England if not in the
States, which, quite frankly, I cannot explain.
 
Now, I have at least a BA in English, and enjoyed the show greatly, though I
suspect much of that enjoyment was knowing that others would not get it all.
But, I am also a twisted, bitter, and class envying swine, and, if I did not
have the privilege of an education which opened this text to me, I would be
offended and bitter.  Why do not vast numbers of the British viewing public
take clubs to BBC house?  Or, at least, refuse to pay their license!
 
And, to segue to EMD--perhaps a parallel.  I assume that most of the audience
of that time were not fully versed in classical lore and that the primary
audience was not the university crowd (Gurr, Barroll, Finkelpearl). So why so
much classical allusion which so many would not understand--I know that my
students (and I) grow quickly tired (and angry) of it all.  Perhaps the Globe
really fell prey to anarchist arsonists?
 
Finally, as a Brit in the US, I baptize many of my friends with _Fawlty Towers_
and, with others on the net, do not understand why the response is so often
anxiety.  I find the show relaxing . . .
 
Gareth M. Euridge
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Jackson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 15 Jun 95 09:24:16 est
Subject: 6.0476  Re: Humor
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0476  Re: Humor
 
Re: British Humor/poetry. The verse quoted is unfamiliar, but it sounds like
Hillaire Belloc.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.