1995

Re: Web Sites; Recordings; Fonts

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0444.  Saturday, 3 June 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Luc Borot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 2 Jun 95 21:30:39 +0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0436  Q: Web Sites
 
(2)     From:   Gail Burns <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 2 Jun 1995 19:42:52 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0440 Recordings
 
(3)     From:   Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
        Date:   Friday, 02 Jun 95 22:33:20 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0440  Fonts
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Luc Borot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 2 Jun 95 21:30:39 +0200
Subject: 6.0436  Q: Web Sites
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0436  Q: Web Sites
 
You can also visit the home page of the CERRA and Cahiers Elisabethains at
 
http://serinf2.univ-montp3.fr
 
Report and criticise. Thank you
 
Luc Borot
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gail Burns <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 2 Jun 1995 19:42:52 -0400
Subject: 6.0440 Recordings
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0440 Recordings
 
John Owen remarks that he has had trouble finding these recordings save at
libraries.  That is exactly where I have been able to BUY, usually for 25 cents
to $2 per album, these recordings.  Many of our local public libraries have
switched from LPs to casettes and CDs exclusively and have sold off their LP
collections at their annual Book Sales - usually with some publicity.
 
I acquired about 15 of the Caedmon Shakespeare series, including the Burton
"Coriolanus" and the Hordern "Titus Andronicus", along with other recorded
theatrical performances as diverse as Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman";
Peter Weiss' "Marat/Sade" (directed by Peter Brook); Howard Sackler's "The
Great White Hope"; and Tennessee Williams' "The Glass Menagerie".  I also have
The Marlowe Society's "Richard II" and an argo recording of Malory's "Le Morte
D'Arthur"
 
All of these records are in nearly new condition (even if their boxes are a
little the worse for the wear) because recorded theatrical performances just
aren't checked out that often.
 
I am sure that New England is not the only place where LPs are selling cheap
and libraries are making the change to newer technology.  I would suggest, as
the warm months bring "Tag Sale Season" to us, that you paw through those boxes
of LPs that inevitably turn up at any good garage sale!
 
Gail Burns
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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
Date:           Friday, 02 Jun 95 22:33:20 EDT
Subject: 6.0440  Fonts
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0440  Fonts
 
Re:  SHAKESPEARE FONT
 
Anyone delving into the mysteries of Shakespearean period typefonts should
consult and giggle over Randall McLeod's (a.k.a. Random Cloud's) Shakespeare
Quarterly essay "The Marriage of Good and Bad Quartos."  Perhaps more important
is his "Spellbound" in G.B.Shand and Raymond C. Shady, PLAY-TEXTS IN OLD
SPELLING (New York: AMS Press, 1984), 81-97.  He shows how the odd shapes of
individual types -- letters and ligatures -- and other unthought of
practicalities often shaped the spellings that we are so antiquarianly fond of
sometimes.  F'rinstance, the "th" ligature at the end of a word like "drinketh"
may have been put in to stretch out the types in a prose line where the
printer's copy reads "drinkes."   And the Drinketh would still be pronounced as
"drinks."   Oh, joy.  There are a lot of puzzles back there in the wilderness
we call the past.
                                          Thteve Urkowith

Re: Miss-Begetting

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0443.  Saturday, 3 June 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 02 Jun 1995 17:43:31 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0439  Re: Miss-Begetting
 
(2)     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 2 Jun 1995 23:19:44 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0439 Re: Miss-Begetting
 
(3)     From:   Anna Cole <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 02 Jun 1995 10:03:16 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0433  Re: Miss-Begetting
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 02 Jun 1995 17:43:31 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0439  Re: Miss-Begetting
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0439  Re: Miss-Begetting
 
With regard to the issue of fertilizing a baby with male or female sperm.  It
is true that male sperm, according to current research theory, are more
vigorous than female, but shorter-lived.  As a result, those trying to
determine the sex of a child before fertilization do work with body
temperature, but only to determine the probable date of ovulation, which
affects body temperature.  One has a better chance of conceiving a male child
on the early side of ovulation, a female on the later side.  But the vigor of
the conception, or as far as I know the degree of penetration are irrelevant
factors.  A very healthy baby girl can be produced from a vigorous conception;
and a healthy boy can indeed be got 'twixt sleep and waking with scarce a
murmur of passion.  A research obstetrician I used to know who worked with
parents to help them "pre-sex" children would at times have wives call their
husbands from his office and loan them a couch if he thought the time for
conception was right. The method seemed to work just fine for both boys and
girls!
 
Do we really need to walk much further down this path?  The Renaissance myths
about conception are probably just that: myths!
 
A well-wishing Shakespearean who hopes to hear little more of this particular
discussion,,
 
Milla Riggio
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 2 Jun 1995 23:19:44 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 6.0439 Re: Miss-Begetting
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0439 Re: Miss-Begetting
 
On the subject of the child being influenced by external influences to the
mother, like the pictures Tom Bishop alludes to, we might also see this sort of
belief applied to animals in Shylock's explanation regarding Laban's sheep.
 
Cheers,
Sean.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anna Cole <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 02 Jun 1995 10:03:16 GMT
Subject: 6.0433  Re: Miss-Begetting
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0433  Re: Miss-Begetting
 
It is interesting to contrast Shakespeare's view of the "dull, stale, tired"
marital bed in Lear with its depiction in Hamlet, 1.v: "But virtue as it never
will be moved/Though lewdness court it in a shape of heaven,/So lust, though to
a radiant angel linked,/Will sate itself in a celestial bed/ and prey on
garbage."  The lust is there but the bed has been imbued (by the Ghost) with a
shining marital sanctity.
 
Anna Cole

CFP: *SQ* Special Issue

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0441.  Friday, 2 June 1995.
 
From:           Sara Jayne Steen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 2 Jun 1995 10:05:06 -0500
Subject:        network call for essays
 
Note: This call is being cross-listed; please excuse any duplication.
 
Call for Essays
 
*Shakespeare Quarterly* is soliciting essays for the winter 1996 issue, a
special issue on "Teaching Judith Shakespeare," to be guest-edited by Elizabeth
H. Hageman and Sara Jayne Steen.  Papers should address approaches to and/or
implications of teaching sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English women
writers in conjunction with Shakespeare. Rather than simply providing useful
readings of paired works, teachers might, for example, examine methods of
teaching *The Tragedy of Mariam* with *Othello,* *The Convent of Pleasure* with
*Love's Labor's Lost,* or Wroth's and Philip's poems with Shakespeare's
sonnets; describe how students respond to Portia and Rosalind when
Shakespeare's plays are juxtaposed with the writings of Aemilia Lanyer, Arbella
Stuart, or Rachel Speght; suggest innovative reconfigurations of courses,
treating issues such as language, spirituality, or the pastoral; or explore
entirely new courses that emerge when these women's works join Shakespeare's as
part of our cultural and literary discussions.
 
Articles should be submitted to both Elizabeth H. Hageman, Department of
English, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824-3574, and Sara Jayne
Steen, Department of English, Montana State University-Bozeman, Bozeman, MT
59717-0230.  The deadline for submissions is 31 October 1995.  Inquiries are
welcome and may be directed to either Professor Hageman or Professor Steen.
 
Elizabeth Hageman
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Sara Jayne Steen
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Re: Elizabethan Directing and Directors

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0442.  Saturday, 3 June 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Ralph Alan Cohen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 02 Jun 1995 16:07:43 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHAKSPER Digest - 31 May 1995 to 1 Jun 1995
 
(2)     From:   Stephen Orgel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 2 Jun 1995 16:07:28 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0440  Inigo Jones regisseur
 
(3)     From:   Dale Lyles <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 3 Jun 1995 11:18:20 -0400
        Subj:   Re: The Director in the Elizabethan Theater
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ralph Alan Cohen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 02 Jun 1995 16:07:43 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re: SHAKSPER Digest - 31 May 1995 to 1 Jun 1995
 
As to directing for the Elizabethan stage, add to Professor Gurr's list of
things a company had to do in the three week gestation period of a production
that one indispensable duty -- perform the plays already in repertoire for a
paying audience. As always, follow the money . . .
 
Ralph Cohen, JMU and SSE
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephen Orgel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 2 Jun 1995 16:07:28 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 6.0440  Inigo Jones regisseur
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0440  Inigo Jones regisseur
 
Tom Bishop is right that masques would need a director where plays might not. I
think Jones is clearly being credited with the job; here's the sentence: "Nor
are these only his [Jones's] due, but divers other accessions to the
strangeness and beauty of the spectacle, as the hell, the going about of the
chariots [another bit of direction], the binding the witches, the turning
machine...." I'm not sure the binding wouldn't have been done by professionals:
Perseus is a professional; the masquers are all women, and wouldn't have done
it. The chariots have torchbearers, 4 for each, so there are lots of available
men who aren't courtiers.
 
Tom, by the way, knows lots about masque direction, having been deeply involved
in an impressive OBERON in Cleveland a couple of years ago. This exists on
tape, for anyone interested.
 
S. Orgel
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dale Lyles <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 3 Jun 1995 11:18:20 -0400
Subject:        Re: The Director in the Elizabethan Theater
 
All the commentary so far on an experienced troupe of actors being able to
"direct" themselves agrees with my experience at my own community theatre.
Ironically, it is only with Shakespeare that our actors have felt freed enough
to take this challenge to its ultimate.
 
When we did Errors two years ago, I selected 15 actors and then waited two
weeks before assigning roles.  In the interim, we workshopped the script,
trading roles and exploring ways to physicalize the text, very
touchy-feely/acrobatic/ensemble.  The result was a very close-knit cast who all
spoke the same "language."
 
One evening, early in the rehearsals, I had to be at another meeting and had
the cast begin work on selected scenes without me.  When I arrived at the
theatre, I found that the first meeting between A of S and Adriana had turned
into this fabulous World Federation of Wrestling tagteam match.  So much for
the director! :)
 
This physical inventiveness continued up to the last performance: A of E,
trying to batter down the door in III.1 during Balthasar's speech [during which
Balthasar and Angelo snickered uncontrollably], suddenly, without warning,
picked up Dromio and hurled *him* against the door.  Lazzi indeed.
 
So now I'm rereading Brown's *Free Shakespeare* to see how I can get a
significantly larger cast to tackle the significantly more complex *Winter's
Tale* this fall.  This group will hear from me again as I begin to formulate
more questions than I can answer.
 
Dale Lyles
Newnan Community Theatre Company
Newnan, GA

Illinois Fest.; Fonts; Recordings; Directing; Tillyard

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0440.  Friday, 2 June 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Pete Guither <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 01 Jun 1995 11:33:27 CST
        Subj:   Il Shakes Fest URL
 
(2)     From:   John Owen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 1 Jun 1995 10:28:46 -0700
        Subj:   Caedmon and Argo
 
(3)     From:   Thomas G. Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 1 Jun 1995 18:32:27 -0400
        Subj:   Re; Directing in the Elizabethan Theater
 
(4)     From:   Jesus Cora <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday,  2 Jun 1995 15:51:33 UTC+0200
        Subj:   SHK 6.0392  Re: Tillyard
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Pete Guither <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 01 Jun 1995 11:33:27 CST
Subject:        Il Shakes Fest URL
 
Info on Illinois Shakespeare Festival 1995 season, new URL address, articles
available, and coming Shakespeare font.
 
The Illinois Shakespeare Festival just got on the web yesterday with a set of
pages which includes information on the Festival and this year's season, plus a
series of articles originally written for our program guides which might be of
interest.  Included are articles on *R&J*, *RII*, *1HIV*, *MND*, a production
of *Pericles* with a deaf actor in the title role and the sign language he
developed for the role, and others.  The URL is:
 
http://orathost.cfa.ilstu.edu/isf.html
 
The 95 season runs June 30 through August 6 and includes *2HIV* (as a
continuation of the history series -- one each year, with a lecture series on
the history and culture of the time), *Cymbeline* (The most common reaction
from our patrons has been "Oh?  Who is THAT by?"), and *Comedy*.  Since there
has been some discussion on the Karamozov *Comedy* here recently, I thought you
might be interested to know that director Steve Rothman is approaching *Comedy*
in the concept of "How 1940's Hollywood viewed America" (I believe we may have
the Marx Brothers in it).
 
Someone earlier was looking for a Shakespearean font.  We are working on
developing a font based on the folio.  It's almost complete (just a matter of
my finding time to add punctuation and an alternate "s" while getting our
season up and running).  We will be making it available free at our web site a
little later this summer.
 
Please let me know if you would like more info on our season, web pages, or the
font.
 
Peter Guither, General Manager
Illinois Shakespeare Festival
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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Owen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 1 Jun 1995 10:28:46 -0700
Subject:        Caedmon and Argo
 
Do not depend on the availability of the Caedmon collection unless it has been
reissued by Harper Audio under their label. Many of the recordings are only
available until the stock purchased by the publisher at the time of acquisition
dries up (conjecture on my part). I experienced this with a number of
non-Shakespearean recordings, and fairly popular ones at that. I'll believe in
the availability of the whole SRS series when someone tells me they bought
Titus Andronicus during the last year. (BTW, this too is excellent, with
Michael Hordern a terrific Titus).
 
Regarding the Argo recordings, officially by the members of the Marlowe
Dramatic Society of Cambridge, they are an interesting series for a number of
reasons. First, they have travelled quite a bit, and I have seen them under not
only the Argo label, but under Decca, London and Newman as well. Second, the
quality is wildly uneven. The Society is made up of amateurs with occasional
appearances by notable professionals. Thus, a truly amateur production of the
two parts of Henry IV moves along at a mediocre clip until part one, I iii,
when out of the blue comes Paul Scofield as Hotspur!!! So you get the Katherina
Minola of Peggy Ashcroft, the scary Margaret of Anjou of Mary Morris, Michael
Hordern's wonderful Prospero and Irene Worth's Cleopatra plonked in the middle
of university level performances (some surprisingly good, e.g. young Derek
Jacobi and Ian McKellen). Nevertheless, I would like to know where David Levine
is getting them. God knows I have had little luck save in libraries.
 
John Owen
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas G. Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 1 Jun 1995 18:32:27 -0400
Subject:        Re; Directing in the Elizabethan Theater
 
Stephen Orgel's note about "directorship" in the masque (is there any specific
indication that it was Jones who was responsible, or might it have been one of
the dancing-masters?) is very much relevant to this discussion, since in the
masque many of the performers were amateurs and could _not_ be expected to have
the sort of developed knowledge of staging that a professional company would
have. Though the Witches were presumably professionals, as I recall, those
binding them were not. (Again, I dont have a text to hand).
 
Tom Bishop
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jesus Cora <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday,  2 Jun 1995 15:51:33 UTC+0200
Subject: Re: Tillyard
Comment:        SHK 6.0392  Re: Tillyard
 
Dear SHAKESPEReans,
 
I have been going through my accumulated e-mail and the discussions on
Tylliard's books have drawn my attention powerfully. I am working on the
evolution of the induction convention and I take the Elizabethan world-view and
its collapse as the basis to establish the factors that influenced this
evolution. I do not think that Tylliard is dated or, for that matter, that his
theories are not tenable anymore. I am sure that some Elizabethan and Jacobean
authors worried over the possibility of this order being lost, and some others
rejoiced at the idea and sought to undermine it in their writings as Dollimore
aptly pointed out. I do not see Tylliard and Dollimore as incompatible, but
complementary. In any case, whether the world view is accepted or rejected in
texts, *it is there* and we must bear it in mind in order to understand the
texts and the point of view of their creators. May I also point to the fact
that our world view is also changing very fast and this changing is producing
conflicts too? Do not we find thar there is as New World (Dis)order after the
Fall of the Wall? I do not know much about the Theory of Chaos, but is it not
changing many of the assumptions held by scientists? Do not many people feel
nostalgia for the Old Order of Political Blocks? Why is there such an obsession
with the occult and religion nowadays? Why are angels so fashionable now? (If
my memory serves me right, Thomas Middleton wrote a treatise on angels in the
1620s) Why is religious bigotry thriving in many societies -the Puritans strike
back-? I think that we are undergoing a process of change similar to that of
1590-1650. Can we consider this contemporary period the Neobaroque?
 
I am looking forward to reading your reflections.
 
Meditatingly and mediatingly yours,
Jesus CORA ALONSO
Universidad de Alcala de Henares.

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