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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: February ::
Re: Working; 3 Hours; Mysticism; The Jew; FE
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0089.  Thursday, 1 February 1996.

(1)     From:   W. Russell Mayes, Jr. <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Jan 1996 12:48:55 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re:  Theatrical Working Conditions and Mysticism

(2)     From:   Joanne Whalen <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Jan 1996 17:13:20 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0084 Q: Three Hours After Marriage

(3)     From:   Susan Mather <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Jan 1996 19:35:09 +73900 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0083  Re: Mysticism

(4)     From:   Florence Amit <
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        Date:   Thursday, 01 Feb 1996 16:45:27 +0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0068  The Jew in Early English Literature

(5)     From:   Richard J Kennedy <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Jan 1996 23:57:08 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0048  Re: "A Funeral Elegy"


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. Russell Mayes, Jr. <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Jan 1996 12:48:55 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Re:  Theatrical Working Conditions and Mysticism

This is a reply to two recent requests for reading material.  Unfortunately, I
don't have the names of the original requestors.  But for the person wondering
about theatrical working conditions, you might look at the work of Muriel
Bradbrook.

For the person working on mysticism, Michel de Certeau's _The Mystic Fable_
might be of use.

My apologies for losing your names, and further apologies if these suggestions
are redundant.

W. Russell Mayes, Jr.
University of North Carolina at Asheville

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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joanne Whalen <
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Date:           Tuesday, 30 Jan 1996 17:13:20 -0500
Subject: 7.0084 Q: Three Hours After Marriage
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0084 Q: Three Hours After Marriage

This is in response to your request about this play. My information came from
Dr. Robert Smallwood, Director of Education at the Shakespeare Centre. We are
setting up a course for June, and when he sent me the list of plays we would be
seeing, his list included on June 18 *Three Hours after Marriage* in the Swan
Theater at Stratford. He was working from a preview of the final draft of the
RSC performance schedule. RSC schedules should be mailed this week, so I would
expect to receive mine within two weeks.  I have no further information yet
except the date and theater. By the way, what is the adress for the RSC's web
page? Thanks, Joanne

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Susan Mather <
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Date:           Wednesday, 31 Jan 1996 19:35:09 +73900 (EST)
Subject: 7.0083  Re: Mysticism
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0083  Re: Mysticism

Hi!  Just wanted to send out a general message to thank all of you for
the information about mysticism.  Keep it coming!  I'm all ears-

Take Care--Susan Mather

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Florence Amit <
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Date:           Thursday, 01 Feb 1996 16:45:27 +0200
Subject: 7.0068  The Jew in Early English Literature
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0068  The Jew in Early English Literature

>>A 1996 NEH Summer Seminar for College Teaching:
>>
>>ABSENCE AND PRESENCE: THE JEW IN EARLY ENGLISH LITERATURE.

Perhaps applicants would like to know Prof. Spector's e-mail address. It is:


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(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard J Kennedy <
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Date:           Tuesday, 30 Jan 1996 23:57:08 -0800
Subject: 7.0048  Re: "A Funeral Elegy"
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0048  Re: "A Funeral Elegy"

Foster says of the "Funeral Elegy" that he would be "happy to see any criticism
of any kind, including even the less sophisticated "ohh, it's yucky,"
variety...."

But how else can we judge a poem but by it's poetic worth -- a judgement of
whether it is "yucky" or not?  The FE is a third rate poem, at best, and is an
amateur effort I would guess.  It lacks all depth of thought, originality, or
excellence of language. It's like a long babbling stream that is shallow the
whole length There is not an arresting image or memorable line in the whole of
it.  If I am wrong about this, let someone pluck something out of it that is
worthy of Shakespeare or any second rate Elizabethan poet.  The thing is 579
lines long, and I find nothing in it above the level of a Hallmark verse.

As to my "less sophisticated" opinion -- less sophisticated than what?  Is
Foster speaking about a computer, some program perhaps that dices poems?  I
only suppose he is, but I don't know. But supposing that he is, and some
computer has pronounced the FE to be by Shakespeare, let one thing be
remembered.  A computer is entirely devoid of human experience, and cannot tell
the difference between "The Owl and the Pussycat" or one of Shakespeare's
sonnets, whether to weep, or laugh, or to be stunned by some understanding of
the human condition.  No computer will ever be able to help us in this.  That's
the profound difference between humans and computers, and the reason I consider
my judgement (or anyone's judgement who has read much poetry), to be sufficient
to say that if Shakespeare wrote the FE he had grown feeble in his mind,
wasteful of words, forgetful of his genius, and dottering in his wisdom to
write such a tiresome farewell to a friend.
 

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