1996

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0128.  Monday, 19 February 1996.

(1)     From:   Carmel Sammut <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 16 Feb 1996 09:56:27 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Shakespearean Semiotics

(2)     From:   Katy Dickinson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 16 Feb 1996 10:01:11 -0800
        Subj:   ACT's "The Tempest"


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carmel Sammut <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 16 Feb 1996 09:56:27 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Shakespearean Semiotics

Can anybody direct me to any studies done with regards Shakespeare and
semiology, especially with regards Macbeth? I have managed to come across only
a handful and am greatly interested to read more literature with this regards.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Katy Dickinson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 16 Feb 1996 10:01:11 -0800
Subject:        ACT's "The Tempest"

No, this is not a movie, it is a real-live stage play running in San Francisco
at the American Conservatory Theater's newly-reopened Geary Theater.  It is
only running until 2/18 and tickets are scarce. However, I saw it this week and
it is worth the trouble of tickets and travel.   The staging is innovative and
mostly effective, Miranda is superb (the best enactment for this part I have
ever seen), Prospero is unusually human, and Ariel is excellent.  Call
415-749-2ACT for information.

Usually Miranda and Ferdinand (the love match for which Prospero arranged the
tempest) seem so sappy and empty that their scenes have only slightly more to
recommend them than does intermission.  In this ACT production, Miranda
actually seemed to me to be more a person.  Her extreme enthusiasm after her
first look at a man other than her Father and the bestial Caliban was charming.

Another review of this production may be found in
        http://www.shakespeare.com/

Of course, the play itself may be found in:
        http://the-tech.mit.edu/Shakespeare/works.html

Katy Dickinson (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.