1996

Re: Shakespeare and the Bible

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0091.  Saturday, 3 February 1996.

(1)     From:   Richard J Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 1 Feb 1996 15:57:39 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0086  Re: Shakespeare and the Bible

(2)     From:   Steven Marx <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 1 Feb 1996 14:05:32 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0086  Re: Shakespeare and the Bible


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard J Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 1 Feb 1996 15:57:39 -0800
Subject: 7.0086  Re: Shakespeare and the Bible
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0086  Re: Shakespeare and the Bible

Paul Franssen is right in that earlier  Bibles had the same words, Shake and
speare in "nearly" the same positions, but not in exactly the same positions,
which is the point of course.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steven Marx <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 1 Feb 1996 14:05:32 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 7.0086  Re: Shakespeare and the Bible
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0086  Re: Shakespeare and the Bible

The current Shakespeare Survey contains an essay dealing with Shakespeare and
the Bible: "Holy War in Henry V." It's also available on the Web at
http://luigi.calpoly.edu/Marx/Publications/henry.html

Steven Marx

Re: The Sonnets; Qs: Female Editors; Stage Directions

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0090.  Thursday, 1 February 1996.

(1)     From:   John Chapot< This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 1 Feb 1996 02:48:07 -0500
        Subj:   Re: The Sonnets. All of 'em

(2)     From:   Julie  Bleha <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Jan 1996 14:22:47 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   re: Pericles/Marina/women

(3)     From:   Robert Robin Fenn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 1 Feb 1996 12:16:24 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Exit Matachin Style


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Chapot< This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 1 Feb 1996 02:48:07 -0500
Subject:        Re: The Sonnets. All of 'em

For an entertaining (conjectural) depiction of the homoerotic origin of the
sonnets read Anthony Burgess' "Nothing Like the Sun". Lots of doublet-ripping.

John Chapot
San Francisco

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Julie  Bleha <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Jan 1996 14:22:47 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        re: Pericles/Marina/women

Hi everyone, here is my first request for information from subscribers to this
list.

I am finishing up a (now very late) paper on female editorship of Shakespeare
(or the lack thereof, up to this time).  As part of the paper, I am looking at
reworking the recognition scene in *Pericles*.  I would greatly appreciate
references to any **recent** articles/books on either/both of these topics.

Thanks,
Julie Bleha
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Columbia University
Workhouse Theater

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Robin Fenn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 1 Feb 1996 12:16:24 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Exit Matachin Style

I am editing William Percy's _Faery Pastorall_ and I'm stumped by a stage
direction which calls for an unusual exit.  A fatigued character who is too
tired to walk off the stage is to be carried off. The stage direction is "Here
they bore him furth on their shoulders after the old manner of the Matachine on
all Fowre with more companie for the cleanlyer Portage." I have read Thoinot
Arbeau's description of the matachin or bouffon, but he merely states that the
dancers withdraw after the dance, with no hint of any needing to be borne off.
I would appreciate any information which might help me discover if the English
version was more like a real duel, with one or more of the dancers feigning
injury or death, and therefore needing to be carried off; or if there is any
other information which might help me gloss this adequately. My guess is that
two other characters would come on (hence on all four) and bear him off on
their shoulders much like pallbearers carry a coffin.  Any ideas?

Robin Fenn
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Announcement and CFP

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0088.  Thursday, 1 February 1996.

(1)     From:   Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Jan 1996 12:57:59 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Conference announcement

(2)     From:   Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Jan 1996 11:15:22 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Call for Papers


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Jan 1996 12:57:59 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Conference announcement

ANNOUNCING

THE MIDDLE AGES IN CONTEMPORARY POPULAR CULTURE

An Interdisciplinary Conference

McMaster University
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
March 29-31, 1996

Keynote Speaker:  Derrick de Kerckhove
Director of the McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology
University of Toronto

This conference will explore the general theme of "The Middle Ages in
Contemporary Popular Culture." This theme is intended to be as open-ended as
possible and will be approached from many directions. Topics include, but are
not limited to:

*Marketing the Middle Ages in music (Gregorian chant, Hildegard of
 Bingen), novels, movies,TV series, video games and CD-ROM
*New Millenarianisms, Satanic cults and witchcraft
*The Middle Ages in nationalist ideologies
*The Middle Ages as an attraction for tourists: visits to archeological
 sites, medieval fairs, feasts and pageants.

A number of special cultural events are also planned, including musical
performances, films, a display of books, videos and interactive multimedia
products.

To receive further information or a registration form, please contact:

Madeleine Jeay               Susan Fast
Department of French         School of Art, Drama and Music
McMaster University          McMaster University
Hamilton, On. Canada L8S 4M2 Hamilton, On.
Canada L8S 4M2
Tel: (905) 525-9140 ext. 2375Tel: (905) 525-9140 ext. 23670
e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. e-mail:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

FAX: (905) 577-6930
http:\\www.mcmaster.ca

Presented by the McMaster Working Group on the Middle Ages and Renaissance

 ***************************************************************************=
LIST OF PARTICIPANTS AND PAPERS:

AVRUTIN Lily, University of Alberta
The Artist as God's Fool; The Case of Andrei Roublev by Andrei Tarkovsky

BEDARD Marie-Christine, Universite Laval, Quebec
Les Medievales de Quebec comme terrain d'experimentation
de la communication de l'histoire.

BLAIN Jenny, Dalhousie University
Witchcraft, Magic and Religion:  Some Discursive Reconstructions
of Belief and Practice.

BRAY Dorothy, McGill University, Montreal
The Beowulf Conceit in Terminators 1 and 2.

BRENT Robert, University of Western Ontario
I'm So Hot for Her and She Is So Cold:  Petrarch and the Rolling Stones.

CAPPS Sandra E., University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Glastonbury: Medieval, Modern and New Age.

CASH John, Indiana University
Structure and Authenticity in the Current Middle Ages.

CHAREST R., Universite Laval, Quebec
Perceptions et critiques historiques des "Medievales" dans les medias.

DARRUP Cathy C., City University of New York
Did God Paint You? The Past as African Identity in Robin Hood,
Prince of Thieves.

de KERCKHOVE Derrick, University of Toronto
The Electronic Middle Ages

DUFRESNE Lucy, Universite d'Ottawa
Which Witch is Which? Recasting Historical Nightmares as Utopian Visions.

ERISMAN Wendy, University of Texas at Austin
For My Lady's Honour: Gender, Performance and the
Reproduction of Social Power in a Medieval Re-Creation Society.

EVERETT William A., Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas
Images of Arthurian Britain in the American Musical Theatre: A
Connecticut Yankee and Camelot.

FLINT Catrena, McGill University, Montreal
Romancing Hildegard: Postmodern Appropriations of a Medieval Composer

GOLINI Vera, St. Jerome's College, Waterloo
Petrarch to Elvis, Lyrics Then and Now.

GREGORY Christine, Florida Intenational University, Miami
"So You Thought WE Have it Bad!" Dysfunctional, Corrupt and Brutal:
Medieval Life in the  Lion in Winter and Braveheart.

HARLEY Maria Anna, McGill University, Montreal
Romancing Hildegard: Postmodern Appropriations of a Medieval Composer.

JEAY Gregoire, Orchestre Baroque de Montreal
Concert with Carolyn Sinclair and the McMaster Dancers.

KENDRIS Theodore, Universite Laval, Quebec
Merlin, Sherlock Holmes and Mr. Spock: The Three Wise Men of Western Culture.

KERSLAKE Geoffrey P., University of Guelph
Popular Culture's Ignored Genre: The Middle Ages in Role-Playing Games

KNIGHT Graham, McMaster University, Hamilton
High-Tech Feudalism: Warrior Culture and Science Fiction Televison.

KOLOZE Jeff, Cleveland State University
Male "Bondage" or "Bonding": Malory's Depictions of Men and their
Relationship to Men of Today.

KREUZIGER-HERR Annette, University of Hamburg, Germany
The Presence of the Past in the Present; Medieval Music in the
Twentieth Century.

LEWIS David Charles, University of Toronto
The Return of Charlemagne;The Middle Ages, the European Idea and the
European Right.

LIFSCHITZ Felice, Columbia University
Welcome to Medieval Life:Crafts, Dungeons and Instruments of Torture in
Sunny Florida.

MARKEWITZ Darrell, The Wareham Forge
Historical Interpretationand Experimental Archeology in the Society for
Creative Anachronism.

MULHBERGER Steven, Nipissing University
The Middle Ages As They Were or As They Should Have Been?

NEWMAN Sharan, University of California, Santa Barbara
Beyond Camelot and Chretien de Troyes: A Social Historian's Use of the
Novel to Teach the Middle Ages.

NOBLE James, University of New Brunswick
The Realm of King Arthur in the Silly Season.

PEDERSON Kristen, University of Toronto
Magic, Power and Women's Sexuality in Medieval Scandinavia.

RABINOVITCH Shelley, Universite d'Ottawa
Which Witch is Which? Recasting Historical Nightmares as Utopian Visions.

RIBORDY Genevieve Universite Laval, Quebec
Le guide: un trait d'union entre la culture savante et la culture populaire.

ROCHER Marie-Claude Universite Laval, Quebec
Fetes populaires et histoire.

SAMPLASKI Artie, University of Indiana
The Middle Ages, Our Current Age and the Current Middle Ages.

SCHUBERT Linda, University of Michigan
Plainchant for the Pictures: The Use of the "Dies Irae" in Film Scores.

SHARP Michael D., University of Michigan
Adventures in the Hypermasculine: Medieval Scotland Goes to the Movies.

VALOIS Jeanne, Universite Laval, Quebec
La communication de l'histoire par le biais de la fete medievale.

WILLARD Tom, University of Arizona
Alchemical Gold: Worth More Than Ever.

WILSON Robert, City University of New York
English Storytelling --Beowulf and Rap.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 Jan 1996 11:15:22 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Call for Papers

I'm forwarding this call for papers on behalf of a colleague who is not a
member of the list.  THe next RMMLA annual convention in beautiful Albuquerque,
NM, should be a particularly festive one since we shall be celebrating our 50th
anniversary.  Regards.

Evelyn Gajowski
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Past President, RMMLA

             ***********CALL FOR PAPERS***********

          *Feminist Perspectives on Renaissance Drama*

          A session of the 50th Annual Convention of the
            Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association
                    Albuquerque, New Mexico
                       24-26 October 1996

Send abstracts or papers by 15 March written on/from any of the (many)
Feminist Perspectives on Renaissance Drama to the following:

        Martha Rust
        Department of English
        322 Wheeler
        University of California
        Berkeley, CA 94720

or:     This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

NOTE:  Papers selected for inclusion in this session are eligible for RMMLA's
annual Cecilia Konchar Farr (best feminist essay) Award.

Re: Working; 3 Hours; Mysticism; The Jew; FE

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0089.  Thursday, 1 February 1996.

(1)     From:   W. Russell Mayes, Jr. <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Jan 1996 12:48:55 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re:  Theatrical Working Conditions and Mysticism

(2)     From:   Joanne Whalen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Jan 1996 17:13:20 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0084 Q: Three Hours After Marriage

(3)     From:   Susan Mather <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Jan 1996 19:35:09 +73900 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0083  Re: Mysticism

(4)     From:   Florence Amit <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 01 Feb 1996 16:45:27 +0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0068  The Jew in Early English Literature

(5)     From:   Richard J Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Jan 1996 23:57:08 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0048  Re: "A Funeral Elegy"


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. Russell Mayes, Jr. <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Jan 1996 12:48:55 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Re:  Theatrical Working Conditions and Mysticism

This is a reply to two recent requests for reading material.  Unfortunately, I
don't have the names of the original requestors.  But for the person wondering
about theatrical working conditions, you might look at the work of Muriel
Bradbrook.

For the person working on mysticism, Michel de Certeau's _The Mystic Fable_
might be of use.

My apologies for losing your names, and further apologies if these suggestions
are redundant.

W. Russell Mayes, Jr.
University of North Carolina at Asheville
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joanne Whalen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Jan 1996 17:13:20 -0500
Subject: 7.0084 Q: Three Hours After Marriage
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0084 Q: Three Hours After Marriage

This is in response to your request about this play. My information came from
Dr. Robert Smallwood, Director of Education at the Shakespeare Centre. We are
setting up a course for June, and when he sent me the list of plays we would be
seeing, his list included on June 18 *Three Hours after Marriage* in the Swan
Theater at Stratford. He was working from a preview of the final draft of the
RSC performance schedule. RSC schedules should be mailed this week, so I would
expect to receive mine within two weeks.  I have no further information yet
except the date and theater. By the way, what is the adress for the RSC's web
page? Thanks, Joanne

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Susan Mather <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 Jan 1996 19:35:09 +73900 (EST)
Subject: 7.0083  Re: Mysticism
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0083  Re: Mysticism

Hi!  Just wanted to send out a general message to thank all of you for
the information about mysticism.  Keep it coming!  I'm all ears-

Take Care--Susan Mather

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Florence Amit <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 01 Feb 1996 16:45:27 +0200
Subject: 7.0068  The Jew in Early English Literature
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0068  The Jew in Early English Literature

>>A 1996 NEH Summer Seminar for College Teaching:
>>
>>ABSENCE AND PRESENCE: THE JEW IN EARLY ENGLISH LITERATURE.

Perhaps applicants would like to know Prof. Spector's e-mail address. It is:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard J Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Jan 1996 23:57:08 -0800
Subject: 7.0048  Re: "A Funeral Elegy"
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0048  Re: "A Funeral Elegy"

Foster says of the "Funeral Elegy" that he would be "happy to see any criticism
of any kind, including even the less sophisticated "ohh, it's yucky,"
variety...."

But how else can we judge a poem but by it's poetic worth -- a judgement of
whether it is "yucky" or not?  The FE is a third rate poem, at best, and is an
amateur effort I would guess.  It lacks all depth of thought, originality, or
excellence of language. It's like a long babbling stream that is shallow the
whole length There is not an arresting image or memorable line in the whole of
it.  If I am wrong about this, let someone pluck something out of it that is
worthy of Shakespeare or any second rate Elizabethan poet.  The thing is 579
lines long, and I find nothing in it above the level of a Hallmark verse.

As to my "less sophisticated" opinion -- less sophisticated than what?  Is
Foster speaking about a computer, some program perhaps that dices poems?  I
only suppose he is, but I don't know. But supposing that he is, and some
computer has pronounced the FE to be by Shakespeare, let one thing be
remembered.  A computer is entirely devoid of human experience, and cannot tell
the difference between "The Owl and the Pussycat" or one of Shakespeare's
sonnets, whether to weep, or laugh, or to be stunned by some understanding of
the human condition.  No computer will ever be able to help us in this.  That's
the profound difference between humans and computers, and the reason I consider
my judgement (or anyone's judgement who has read much poetry), to be sufficient
to say that if Shakespeare wrote the FE he had grown feeble in his mind,
wasteful of words, forgetful of his genius, and dottering in his wisdom to
write such a tiresome farewell to a friend.

Productions: R3; Ado; Ham.; Oth.; Mac; MND

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0087.  Thursday, 1 February 1996.

(1)     From:   Christine Mack Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Jan 96 11:41:19 -0600
        Subj:   Looking for Richard

(2)     From:   Chris Shamburg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Jan 96 14:24:47 EST
        Subj:   Modern Much Ado

(3)     From:   Mark Fisher <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 1 Feb 1996 15:10:13 +0000
        Subj:   Current Hamlets

(4)     From:   Tunis Romein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 31 Jan 1996 18:16:35 0
        Subj:   Olivier's "Othello"

(5)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 01 Feb 1996 09:29:05 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Review of Fahrenheit *Macbeth*

(6)     From:   Scott Crozier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 1 Feb 1996 09:13:19 +1000
        Subj:   RSC *MND*;


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Mack Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Jan 96 11:41:19 -0600
Subject:        Looking for Richard

Yesterday's New York Times included an article by Janet Maslin about the
Sundance Film Festival that mentioned the "meditation on *Richard III*"
directed by Al Pacino. Here's the relevant paragraph:

'Though Mr. Pacino hardly falls under the heading of new talent, his
out-of-competition film proved one of the festival's true revelations. Far from
being a vanity production or dilettantism, "Looking for RIchard" is sharp,
funny and illuminating in its efforts to explicate Shakespeare's text. Mr.
Pacino tries everything: talking to people in the street about "Richard III,"
grilling well-known Shakespearean performers (including John Gielgud, Kenneth
Branagh and Vanessa Redgrave) about the play, dissecting and analyzing his own
prodcution with members of his steller case (Winona Ryder, Alec Baldwin, Kevin
Spacey), clowning freely and even throwing in flashes of "The Tempest" simply
because he felt like it. Mr. Pacino also acts Richard's role with the crackling
intensity of his great film performances instead of the empty histrionics of
"Heat." In ways that finally seem less arbitrary than those of the current film
"Richard III," he makes the play come newly alive.'

Certainly sounds worth seeing!

Chris Gordon

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Shamburg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Jan 96 14:24:47 EST
Subject:        Modern Much Ado

I heard a rumor that there is a modern adaptation of *Much Ado* called *Hot
January.*  Rumor has it that it is touring in Canada and that it is a
musical(Benedick's first song is "Hey, how ya doin'").  Is there anyone on the
list that can confirm this?

Sincerely,
Chris Shamburg
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mark Fisher <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 1 Feb 1996 15:10:13 +0000
Subject:        Current Hamlets

I'm about to write a newspaper article connected to the publication of Michael
Pennington's *Hamlet: A User's Guide* (Nick Hern Books, UK). Does anyone know
of any current or imminent productions of Hamlet that I might be able to
cross-refer to? I'm aware of the Robert Lepage one-man version, and the Peter
Brook reworking.

Thanks.
Mark Fisher (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.,uk)

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tunis Romein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 Jan 1996 18:16:35 -0500
Subject:        Olivier's "Othello"

Does anyone know where to purchase an _audio_ (not video) recording of
Olivier's performance of Othello?

Tunis Romein
Charleston, SC  USA
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 01 Feb 1996 09:29:05 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Review of Fahrenheit *Macbeth*

I promised a review of Fahrenheit Theatre Company's *Macbeth* ("Angels and
ministers of grace defend us!") and here it is:

The black and white set has two levels with long stairs to right and=  left and
a round central exit space at stage level. The two levels are effectively used
in this production.  As the initial, symbolic action begins, Duncan stands on
the upper level, presiding over an internecine battle of six thanes, who, on
the lower level, hold a cloth of many tartans as they kill each other and tear
the cloth to pieces.  Don't look for this is Shakespeare"s script, but it is
well-done and leads to the entrance of Macbeth and Banquo in 1.3. In this
production, the battle is still raging in 1.3, and Macbeth and Banquo enter
berserk and fighting, mistake each other for the enemy (nice touch),  and fight
stoutly until mutual recognition and are hailed by the witches who are onstage
as they fight.

The costumes, with hints of tartan and armor,  suggest medieval Scotland. One
local critic complained that the costumes are not made of heavy wool as they
probably would have been in Scotland!  Perhaps the realist critics are still
with us. My apologies to Alan Desson for doubting him!  Nevertheless, Desson
would like the minimalist assumptions of this production.

Khristopher Lewin plays a very genial Macbeth,  a Macbeth who acknowledges his
debt to Richard III.  It was impossible for me to dislike this rollicking,
laughing murderer who is easily devastated with the qualms of conscience. He
does exhibit a growing coarseness, but he hardly loses audience sympathy =96 my
sympathy at any rate. In his final battle, he is apparently carefree because he
has so completely bought the prophecies.  He fights and kills young Siward
(Nicholas Rose) almost in the comic mode, playing with him as a cat plays with
a mouse, finally stabbing him (significantly) in the back. Macbeth is finally
killed by Macduff with the points of his own crown.

Marni Penning's Lady Macbeth emphasizes the youth of this murderous duo. She
smiles happily in 2.5 as she says, "Glamis thou art, and Cawdor, and shalt be /
What thou art promis'd."  She's too young to know what she and her husband are
getting themselves into.   By 3.2, there is a coarsening of their relationship,
and Macbeth treats her with a barely restrained brutality; his geniality is
lost, and she looks out at the "rooky wood" with fear on her face.  Her final
madness recalls very nicely the scene following the murder of Duncan:  in both
the actors =96 stumbling and groping --  pretend that the stage is totally dark
a very fine touch.  (Penning also doubles effectively as Macduff's child in
this case female.)

Lewin and Penning are supported by an excellent cast. Randy Lee Bailey plays
an attractive, full-bodied, jovial Banquo who gives me the impression of a
valiant warrior who has been (at least partially) co-opted by Macbeth.  (I
asked Bailey about my impression, and he bridled a bit. He felt that his
Banquo had not completely sold out to Macbeth.) Some of Bailey's best
moments come as Banquo's ghost: blood covered and silently laughing at
Macbeth.

David Frydrychowski plays a tall, athletic, totally serious Macduff.  In his
interview with Malcolm, played by C. Charles Scheeren,  Macduff seems to be
completely out of his depth: a poor Scottish lad who is duped by a less than
honorable Malcolm. Scheeren"s stories of moral turpitude seem so much more
honest than his claims of virginity.  Scheeren also plays the apparitions in
3.6, linking him to the evil powers. (The doubling in this production is never
disguised, and is usually meaningful.)

Richard Arthur, the oldest member of the company, plays a convincing Duncan,
and doubles as Old Siward. William Sweeney, Richard Kelly, Jim Stump, Nicholas
Rose, and Toni Brotons-Goodney play an assortment of Scottish thanes and
nobles, who are interesting divided into "politicians" and "warriors" according
to their red or brown cloaks.

The Janus-faced (fair and foul) weird sisters are played by Jeanne Gibowicz,
Regina Cerimele, and Lisa Penning.  On the backs of their heads,  they wear
ugly masks with their hair pulled through the masks acting as beards. In front,
they are beautiful, indeed charming, young women. Their body stockings suggest
that they are element: air, water, and fire. (Hecate is the fourth element
"earth" as I recall. I may have the elements incorrectly distributed.)  In any
case, the sisters turn their charming faces to Macbeth and their ugly faces to
Banquo: thus Banquo"s  description of them as withered, wild, and bearded.
(They tend to dance circles around Macbeth!)

One of the most interesting aspects of this production is Jasson Minadakis"s
decision to openly double R. Chris Reeder as the bloody captain (1.2), the
porter, the third murderer, Hecate, and Seyton.  Reeder has shaved his head (as
have several of the other actors) and wears a wig for the porter and as he is
speaking the line "I devil-porter it no longer" (2.3.17), he pulls off his wig
to reveal the bloody captain. Later the audience comes to think that all these
roles are played by an omni-present Hecate, who acts in both a fair and a foul
manner, both saving and killing.  Purists will not be, indeed have not been,
amused.  I thought the doubling worked; if only to increase the audience's
sense of the mystery of evil and the Janus-faced world of this play.

The show is at the Aronoff Center for the Arts in downtown Cincinnati, and
closes on February 11. I have heard on good authority that there are only about
100 seats remaining.  The matinee on February 3 is sold out. So if you are
interested in attending, better act soon. Tickets may be purchase by phone at
(513) 241-SHOW.  By the way, I'm not employed by the Fahrenheit Theatre
Company!  I'm simply interested in keeping Shakespeare alive and well in
Cincinnati.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

(6)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Crozier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 1 Feb 1996 09:13:19 +1000
Subject:        RSC *MND*;

In reply to Heather Stephenson's query,

As far as I know only Stella Gonet has had to leave the original cast of the
Dream on tour as she had other commitments. I was the person who suggested that
the actors treated it as a warm up which makes me even more suspicious about
the philosophy of the Stratford powers that be, the worth of academic criticism
of a production when the production proved so popular and why it is that
mediocrity has been allowed to dictate recent productions at Stratford. A
subjective gripe I know but one that has troubled me for some time. When the
humour of the lovers flight through the forest is based on static, shallow
sight gags - what happens to the audience perception of both the production and
the play?

Regards,
Scott Crozier

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.