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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: January ::
Abhorson; Voice-over Hamlet?; Renaissance typefaces
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0003. Thursday, 4 January 1996.

(1)     From:   David Lindley <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 12 Dec 1995 22:35:27 GMT
        Subj:   Re: Abhorson

(2)     From:   Greg Grainger <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 12 Dec 1995 18:25:37 -0500
        Subj:   Voice-over Hamlet?

(3)     From:   James Schaefer <SCHAEFEJ@GUVAX.BITNET>
        Date:   Tuesday, 12 Dec 1995 22:49:09 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   RE:  pantomime *Hamlet*

(4)     From:   Peter Guither <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 13 Dec 1995 12:53:06 -0600
        Subj:   Re: Renaissance typefaces


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Lindley <
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Date:           Tuesday, 12 Dec 1995 22:35:27 GMT
Subject:        Re: Abhorson

I've no bright new reading of Abhorson's strained syllogism - but it's possible
that in calling his trade a 'mystery' he is meaning a little more than
'profession' - the gloss preferred by Gibbons and accepted by others.  Richard
van Dulmen, in _Theatre of Horror_ (Polity Press, 1990) pp. 65-70, writes  very
interestingly of the ways in which, at least in Germany, the executioner was
both reviled for his trade, and yet at the same time 'believed to be endowed
with almost magical healing powers'. He concludes  that he was considered
'uncanny, but also beneficial'. I don't know if there is any parallel for these
beliefs in early modern England - but would be interested to find out.

David Lindley

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Greg Grainger <
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Date:           Tuesday, 12 Dec 1995 18:25:37 -0500
Subject:        Voice-over Hamlet?

On December 11, Michael Friedman <
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 > wrote:

> I started to wonder
> about *To be or not to be*.  If, as it has been asserted, most audiences know
> it so well by now that they hardly pay attention to the words, does the actor
> even need to speak the lines?  What would happen if he just thought them?  Not
> with a voice-over, but silently, in his own head, accompanied by only those
> gestures that a person, lost in agitated thought, might make.

Didn't Mel Gibson do just this in his film version of Hamlet?


(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Schaefer <SCHAEFEJ@GUVAX.BITNET>
Date:           Tuesday, 12 Dec 1995 22:49:09 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        RE:  pantomime *Hamlet*

What Michael Friedman describes sounds like a silent-film version of the play,
with an occasional dialogue card ("There's the rub!").  I must assume that
silent-era directors tried to film Shakespeare -- a totally boggling concept!
-- and that they did not put all 4,000 lines of text on the screen.  Has anyone
seen such films, and do they bear any relationship to Friedman's proposal for
dealing with "To be...."?

Jim Schaefer
Georgetown University

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Guither <
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 >
Date:           Wednesday, 13 Dec 1995 12:53:06 -0600
Subject:        Re: Renaissance typefaces

The Illinois Shakespeare Festival has finally finished a working version of a
font based on Shakespeare's Folio.

The main structure of this font will work best for limited use (it's great for
display work, like the titles of the plays). In order to have a font that had
some additional value, however, we added some characters to aid in its use for
text. Because it was expected that its use would be greater for titles or
display work, it has a more oblique feel than most of the text in the folio and
some of the caps are a little fancy for that use (more like the italics used
for songs or character names), but it still can work for text.

In addition to the full set of upper and lower case letters, the font does
contain two alternate versions of the lower case "s", one alternate of upper
case "A", ligatures for "sh" and "ct" and some standard punctuation. The "read
me" file contains some tips for using the alternate "s" versions.

This should be considered a first version. With your feedback, we will attempt
to fine-tune and add for future releases. Are there additional ligatures which
would be useful? Should we have a second, non-oblique font that would be used
for straight text? Are there other punctuation marks or symbols that are
needed? Please let us know.

Michael Scott Mann (a student at Illinois State University) did all the heavy
lifting on this font and created the bulk of it, while I added ligatures,
alternate characters, some refinements and finishing work.

This font is Freeware. The Illinois Shakespeare Festival retains the rights to
the font, but you may distribute and use it freely as long as it is not sold or
altered and the "read me" file is included.

The font is called "ILShakeFest"  --  Wouldn't "FolioFont" or "Shakespeare"
have been more appropriate? Probably. But that's what you pay for a free font.
We get a little publicity. Fair trade?

I uploaded the Mac version of the font to America Online a few days ago and it
has been selected as "Font of the Week."  It is available there in the "New
Uploads" section of "Desktop Publishing."   The PC version will be uploaded
within the week.

Both PC/Windows and Mac versions of the font are available at our web site:
http://orathost.cfa.ilstu.edu/isf.html which also includes a graphic image of
the font.  Both versions include both Type 1 and Truetype fonts.  The PC
version is ".zip" and the Mac version is ".sit.hqx" so you'll need the proper
utilities for de-compressing. (stuffit expander for the Mac will work just
fine, and any unzipping program for the PC)  If any Shaksper members have
trouble getting files from the web, email me at 
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and I'll be happy to send the appropriate version to you.

Hope you find it useful, and I await your comments, suggestions and critiques!

Peter Guither
General Manager, Illinois Shakespeare Festival
 

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