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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: January ::
Anti-Memorial Reconstruction; RNT RII
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0029.  Thursday, 11 January 1996.

(1)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Jan 1996 14:53:09 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   [Anti-Memorial Reconstruction]

(2)     From:   Rick Jones <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Jan 1996 23:09:29 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   RNT RII


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Wednesday, 10 Jan 1996 14:53:09 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        [Anti-Memorial Reconstruction]

In *Making Sense of the First Quartos of Shakespeare's *Romeo and Juliet*,
*Henry V*, *The Merry Wives of Windsor* and *Hamlet** (Shimla: Indian Institute
of Advanced Studies, 1995), Yashdip Bains argues against the hypothesis of
memorial reconstruction, and suggests that these first quartos are the earliest
versions of the plays, versions that were later revised by Shakespeare.
(Obviously I'm not the author of this book, but I'm hoping that I may draw it
to your attention nonetheless.)

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rick Jones <
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Date:           Wednesday, 10 Jan 1996 23:09:29 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        RNT RII

I was surprised to read in the new Newsweek that the National Theatre's
production of Richard II with Fiona Shaw in the title role is regarded as
controversial.  I had the opportunity to see it last week, and found it
stimulating and engaging... but hardly revolutionary.  (Is casting a woman as
Richard really that big a deal?)  I'd appreciate hearing other SHAKSPEReans'
reactions to the production, as well as any details of the "controversy."

If anyone is interested in a brief review of the production, I'd be happy to
provide one.

Cheers,
Rick Jones

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