Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: January ::
Re: Development of Individualism
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0034.  Friday, 12 January 1996.

(1)     From:   Chris Stroffolino <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Jan 1996 20:40:57 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0028  Re: Individualism

(2)     From:   Jesus Cora <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 12 Jan 1996 13:59:23 UTC+0200
        Subj:   SHK 7.0002  Re: Development of Individualism


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Stroffolino <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 11 Jan 1996 20:40:57 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 7.0028  Re: Individualism
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0028  Re: Individualism

Dear Bill G.---

Though I think I basically agree with you about "individualism" and question
the critical industry that likes to locate it around the time of Shakes or
Descartes (whether in Eliot, Bloom or Foucault), your characterisation of what
TROILUS (Shakes' I assume not Chaucer's) is NOT is a fitting characteristic of
PUCK, and MND seems to be in many ways an anti-individualist play (though
Theseus, on close reading, seems like a mini-version of Emerson's
self-relaince). But the point I wanted to address has to do with BEOWULF. You
raise a good point about the heroic attitudes in this piece, but of course
there's GRENDEL, who in many ways is INDIVIDUALISM incarnate, in terms of the
anti-social being...I like comparing/contrasting BEOWULF to CAEDMON'S
HYMN---the two "portals" at the beginning of many anthologies of BRITISH LIT.
Not only do we see "lyric" vs. "epic" distinction here, but also it seems that
if CAEDMON resembles anybody in BEOWULF, it would have to be GRENDEL, and it is
precisely in terms of "individualism" that CAEDMON does so (I'm referring to
the STORY of how the hymn was written, which is, for me at least, far more
interesting than the hymn itself---but then we don't have the TUNE, which may
have been quite infectious....) Chris Stroffolino

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jesus Cora <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 12 Jan 1996 13:59:23 UTC+0200
Subject: Re: Development of Individualism
Comment:        SHK 7.0002  Re: Development of Individualism

Dear William Godshalk,

I appreciate your commentaries.

Of course I do not deny that Socrates or any other human being of any time
previous to the Renaissance was self-conscious. It is just that I think that
individualism and self-consciousness are quite relevant in the period, much
more than in any other period. As to drama, with the huge amounts of
plays-within-the-plays and other insets, as well as self-reference to the
dramatic art in many of the plays, I think that theatrical self-conscious- ness
also becomes quite important and may be included in a general drive to and
interest in self-consciousness (but, again, I know, we also find theatrical
self-consciousness in Terence).

I'm quite glad that you point out that self-consciosness is a common trait to
human beings. It seems that there are people left who still belief in common
human characteristics. After reading so much Shaksper submissions I was
beginning to think that the existence of a core of common human experience was
the fruit of my imagination.

Yours,
J. Cora
U. de Alcala de Henares (Spain)
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.