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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: January ::
Re: Winter's Tale Photos; Soliloquies
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0040.  Saturday, 13 January 1996.

(1)     From:   Dale Lyles <
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        Date:   Friday, 12 Jan 1996 15:18:45 -0500
        Subj:   Winter's Tale Photos

(2)     From:   Jesus Cora <
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        Date:   Friday, 12 Jan 1996 13:57:47 UTC+0200
        Subj:   SHK 6.0942  Soliloquies


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dale Lyles <
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Date:           Friday, 12 Jan 1996 15:18:45 -0500
Subject:        Winter's Tale photos

Those who are curious as to what the NCTC Winter's Tale looked like can catch a
few production photos over on our brand new web page:
http://shenandoah.peachnet.edu/~dlyles/nctc-www/nctc.html

Alas, I have no photos of the final scene; I'm working towards pulling some
from the video.

Dale Lyles
Newnan Community Theatre Company

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jesus Cora <
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 >
Date:           Friday, 12 Jan 1996 13:57:47 UTC+0200
Subject: Soliloquies
Comment:        SHK 6.0942  Soliloquies

[I tried to submit this message earlier this month, but I haven't been able
to do so because of the bug Hardy has told us about]

Dear all,

I have been reviewing my e-mail after Christmas and I have decided to add one
little observation to the issue of soliloquies after having read Robert
Yarington's *Two Tragedies in One*. In this play, the asides of the characters
are followed by the stage directions *To the people*, indicating that these
were addressed to the audience. These asides show what the murderous characters
really think, in contrast to what they tell other characters. Therefore, as
they are a way of conveying their internal thoughts just as soliloquies are, I
think it is possible to infer that the Elizabethan and Jacobean practice was to
address the soliloquies to the audience and not to pretend that the characters
were "thinking aloud". Could you find any texts in which soliloquies are pre-
ceded by the direction *To the people*? This, I admit, contradicts my previous
message on the subject.

Yours,
J. Cora
Universidad de Alcala de Henares (Spain)
 

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