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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: January ::
Re: Cross-Dressing; New Films; RSC Dream;
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0052.  Monday, 22 January 1996.

(1)     From:   Susan Smather <
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        Date:   Friday, 19 Jan 1996 16:54:20 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0050  Qs: Cross-Dressing

(2)     From:   Joe Shea <
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        Date:   Friday, 19 Jan 1996 19:22:36 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0049 New Films

(3)     From:   Scott Crozier <
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        Date:   Saturday, 20 Jan 1996 16:02:48 +1000
        Subj:   Re: RSC Dream

(4)     From:   Jesus Cora <
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        Date:   Monday, 22 Jan 1996 14:29:04 UTC+0200
        Subj:   SHK 7.0034  Re: Development of Individualism


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Susan Smather <
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Date:           Friday, 19 Jan 1996 16:54:20 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 7.0050  Qs: Cross-Dressing
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0050  Qs: Cross-Dressing

Dear Shirley Kagan,

I'm not sure of the author's name right now--it's Friday after all--but, last
semester, in my Women and the Renaissance class, the professor brought in a
good size volume of a text called, Vested Interests.  It was very fascinating.
If I'm not mistaken, I believe that the author traces the movement of
crossdressing throughout history.  Last semester, I working on crossdressing
and As You Like It so hopefully, this weekend I will find my notes on some
other sources.

Cheers!--Susan Mather
         
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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joe Shea <
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Date:           Friday, 19 Jan 1996 19:22:36 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 7.0049 New Films
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0049 New Films

I saw Othello and liked it very much.  Larence Fishburn and Kenneth Branagh
were just terrific.  It is this kind of work that may make Shakespeare more
accessible to a generation whose ears are pitched to gangsta rap!  Who knows --
maybe they'll even move from rhyme to poetry.

Best,
Joe Shea

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Crozier <
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Date:           Saturday, 20 Jan 1996 16:02:48 +1000
Subject:        Re: RSC Dream

In reply to comments by John Chapot, I also saw the RSC production in Stratford
in 1994 and am about to deliver a paper at the Australian and New Zealand
Shakespeare Association's Conference in Sydney in which, among other things, I
will be discussing its inadequacies as a production. Just a short comment here
- I'm trying to pack - I was interested that all the leading  actors who were
in the Dream at Stratford had what most of them would have described as more
important major roles in other productions during that season; Jenkings played
Pier Gynt; Stephens (Lysander) was Coriolanus; Gonet was Isabelle and so on.
Although the production was the most popular of the season, I felt that many of
the personell treated it as a warm up. It sounded beautiful and looked
interesting (with more that its fair share of Brook quotations) but I found it
lacklustre and stilted. There was very muddied development of the dream with
Hippolyta and Theseus being doubled with the fairy squabblers and therefore the
"dream" should have been theirs, but Bottom's imagination supplied the
personell of the dream in the form of his lost lads doubling as the named
fairies. Must pack

Regards
Scott Crozier

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jesus Cora <
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Date:           Monday, 22 Jan 1996 14:29:04 UTC+0200
Subject: Re: Development of Individualism
Comment:        SHK 7.0034  Re: Development of Individualism

Dear Chris Stroffolino,

Ok, you see individualism in Grendel. While I agree with you that we can infer
that from the fact that he opposes Beowulf, who is willing to die for the
common good of his people, I do not see much self-consciousness in Grendel or,
for that matter, in Beowulf. I think that individualism and self-consciousness
go hand in hand, reinforcing mutually. If a character lacks self-consciousness
we cannot say that s/he is a good portrayal of individualism. I see Grendel and
Beowulf as opposed archetypes of evil and good. Negative individualism (egoism)
is subsumed in a general notion of evil, therefore I think there is not much
room for seeing Grendel as a fully realised self-conscious, individualist
character like Iago (yes, I know, Iago also shows characteristics appertaining
to the Vice, hence the Devil, and he is a Renaissance malcontent).

Bye for now.
J. Cora
 

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