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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: January ::
Qs: Theatrical Working Conditions; Shakespeare & the
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0079.  Monday, 29 January 1996.

(1)     From:   Greg Grainger <
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        Date:   Saturday, 27 Jan 1996 23:18:18 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Theatrical working conditions.

(2)     From:   Jeff Questad <
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        Date:   Sunday, 28 Jan 1996 13:57:35 -0800
        Subj:   Shakespeare and the Bible


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Greg Grainger <
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Date:           Saturday, 27 Jan 1996 23:18:18 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Theatrical working conditions.

I've got this idea in my head for a research project, and frankly, I'm stymied
as to where to begin.

I'd like to investigate the working conditions of theatre workers - not just
actors, but painters, carpenters, stagehands, designers, directors, etc. at
various times in history, especially Elizabethan and Victorian.

Wages, hours required, duties, procedures, working conditions, and how these
things compared to other trades and businesses at the time are all grist for
the mill.

Any ideas, books, headings to search the library catalogues under that I
haven't already thought of, etc., will be gratefully received.

Thanks in advance,
Greg.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jeff Questad <
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Date:           Sunday, 28 Jan 1996 13:57:35 -0800
Subject:        Shakespeare and the Bible

Just read Anthony Burgess' speculations on Shakespeare's possible contributions
to the King James Bible in 1610.  (He suggests the 46th Psalm, the 46th word of
which is "shake" and the 46th word from the end of is "spear", was written by
WS and that this is the kind of pun he was likely to include in this less than
public work).  Can anyone point me in the direction of some other literature on
the question of Shakespeare's participation on the King Jame's translation?
Pro or con, credible or otherwise.  Speulation welcome.  I'd love to have some
ideas from you on verses from the King Jame's that smell like Shakespeare.

Sincerely, Questad
 

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