1996

MLA Panel CFP: Personation in 16th-C Drama

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0024.  Tuesday, 9 January 1996.

From:           R. G. Siemens <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 8 Jan 1996 17:19:29 -0800
Subject:        MLA Panel CFP: Personation in 16th-C Drama

_The Performance of Personation in 16th-Century Drama_.
(A panel at the 1996 MLA Convention in Washington.)

The representation of Tudor historical figures in 16th-century English Drama:
politics of performance, archival studies, biography, historical research,
theoretical issues. 1-page proposals by 31 March; Ray Siemens or Patricia
Badir, English Department, University of British Columbia, 397-1873 East Mall,
Vancouver, BC, Canada. V6T 1Z1; or by e-mail to <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.

[This CFP is from the MLA Newletter (Fall 1995, page 11).  This message has
been crossposted; please excuse duplication.]

Re: Apology; Handfasting; Ham. Quotation;

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0023.  Tuesday, 9 January 1996.

(1)     From:   J. H. Sawday <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 8 Jan 1996 17:55:04 +0000 (GMT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0014  Sidney's Apology

(2)     From:   Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 8 Jan 1996 17:07:12 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0019 Qs: Handfasting Illustrations

(3)     From:   Michele Crescenzo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 8 Jan 96 17:11:03 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0019 Qs: *Hamlet*

(4)     From:   Thomas G. Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 8 Jan 1996 17:51:49 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0018  Re: Development of Individualism


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           J. H. Sawday <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 8 Jan 1996 17:55:04 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: 7.0014  Sidney's Apology
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0014  Sidney's Apology

Geoffrey Shepherd's ed. of Sidney's _Apology for Poetry_ is (according to GBIP)
still in print: ISBN 0 7190 0516 7 (Manchester University Press, 1964) price
L.9.99. Shepherd's introductory essay, though dated, is still a comprehensive
account not only of the genesis of the _Apology_ but of the text's position
within the complex rhetorical debates Sidney was enagaged in. Certainly,
students find it helpful. I also note that there is an ed. of the _Apology_
published in London by Sangam (1986), originally published in Hyderabad by
Orient Longman (1975) edited by Visvanath Chatterjee. ISBN: 0 86131 662 2. At
L. 2.95, this looks like remarkably good value.

Jonathan Sawday
Department of English,
University of Southampton,

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 8 Jan 1996 17:07:12 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 7.0019 Qs: Handfasting Illustrations
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0019 Qs: Handfasting Illustrations

To Michael Friedman,

I don't know about illustrations of handfasting, but for a sense of the staging
of it, perhaps you should look at the "promise" scene between the incestuous
sister and brother in 'TIS PITY SHE'S A WHORE.  But why would you need a
picture?  There's no handfast scene on stage in MEAS, is there?  Are you
thinking of introducing one?

Helen Ostovich
Department of English / Editor, _REED Newsletter_
McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada  L8S 4L9

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michele Crescenzo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 8 Jan 96 17:11:03 EST
Subject: 7.0019 Qs: *Hamlet*
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0019 Qs: *Hamlet*

On 7 Jan 96, John Lee wrote:

>Some years ago I read and noted the following comment of a critic reflecting on
>the proliferation of interpretations of Hamlet's actions.  He suggested that it
>was time to stop speculating on whether the Prince was mad, and proposed
>another question: 'Are the Comentators on Hamlet Really Mad, Or Only Pretending
>to be?'
>
>Unfortunately I didn't note down the author and work, and now I need to provide
>a reference for the phrase.  Can anyone help?

The author of this is Oscar Wilde, and thanks for reminding me of it: it's one
of my favorites.  Wilde once remarked to his friend Robert Ross, "My next
Shakespeare book will be a discussion as to whether the commentators on
_Hamlet_ are mad or only pretending to be."  This info is from Richard
Ellmann's biography, _Oscar Wilde_ (299).

Michele Crescenzo
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Rutgers University-Newark

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas G. Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 8 Jan 1996 17:51:49 -0500
Subject: 7.0018  Re: Development of Individualism
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0018  Re: Development of Individualism

I think it might help a bit here to attempt to distinguish between
"individuality" as fact and as value (the terms are provisional). All creatures
from the level of, say, fish, experience themselves as in important ways
separate from other creatures, even if it is only on the level of the
competition for food or the attempt to escape mortal peril. In times of acute
starvation mothers will even abandon (or eat) their young. It's hard to
imagine, in a Darwinian universe, any other evolutionarily possible outcome
than individualism at this level. So I'm with Bill Godshalk here. It is a not
unreasonable inference that complex individual biological organs like human
brains will have the capacity and tendency to encode experience as fact in ways
that contribute to the survival of the individual, though this does not mean
that such a complex organ could not also over-ride such an inherent tendency in
particular cases. The recognition of the SEPARATE fate of individuals in
respect at least of death is an important, but not very high-level one. And
accordingly, our relation to our bodies, our sense-perceptions, and perhaps
even our emotions, tends to be predicated on our experience of them as
individual. I can move my hand by willing it. You cannot move my hand by
willing it.

(Stephanie Hughes notwithstanding to the contrary, it is just not true that
individuality is the product of agricultural community or "civilization".
Hunter-gatherer cultures such as Australian aboriginal tribes have highly
complex and sophisticated mechanisms for identifying individuals and for
assigning to them quite specific individual "bits" of a common culture, such
that each member of a tribe will have his or her own peculiar "dreaming" -- a
kind of personal mythography. That all the bits are needed to make the culture
work does not imply that there is no value attributed to the individual in that
culture.)

It is, however, a different thing to speak of the promotion of "individuality"
from fact to value, from an inalienable (except under extreme conditions,
perhaps such as hypnosis, torture and so forth, conditions that Althusserian
Marxism takes as normal for everyone but Marxist theoreticians) aspect of
experience, to a cultural institution with specific investments of ideological
and discursive effort. At the latter level, it's a whole new ballgame.  I note
for the current argument that "even" medieval culture, which so many people
these days seem to believe was a kind of anonymous and anodyne period in which
people knew their place and did as they were ideologically instructed, had a
powerful overarching commitment to the idea of the "individual soul" which had
certain prerogatives, notably ones _not_ granted to, say, slaves in antiquity.
There is all the difference in the world between noting that MSS were not
(often) personally signed or notated by their writers, and the claim that these
writers "did not experience themselves as individuals."

But actual history always screws up theory's horoscopes.

Cheers,

This node of ideological space-time-discourse intersections.

Re: Book Announcement: Trial Posting

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0021. Monday, 8 January 1996.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, January 8, 1996
Subject: 6.0956 Book Announcement: Trial Posting
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0956 Book Announcement: Trial Posting

On Saturday, December 9, 1996, I sent out a digest labeled "Book Announcement:
Trial Posting" and wrote

>[SHAKSPEReans:  I am posting the following to determine, in part, how the
>membership feels about the inclusion of Book Announcement postings.  I will
>consider ALL responses to this request to be personal mail to me; I will
>reflect upon those responses; and then I will announce whether or not such
>postings will appear in the future.  -- Hardy M. Cook, Editor]

I received many responses -- both pro and con -- and I have reflected and
decided to allow book announcement with the following stipulations suggested
to me by those who responded.  All such annoucements

1)  will be identified in the subject line as Book Announcement(s): NAME OF
    BOOK(S),

2)  should be brief, informative, descriptive, Shakespeare-related, and
    recently published,

3)  should include title, publisher, date, subject,

4)  should come from authors NOT publishers,

5)  should NOT be promotional, and

6)  will be grouped together when possible and only be announced on an
    irregular basis.

With these stipulations, book announcements are now acceptable.

Let me conclude by adding that one respondent hoped that book announcements
might encourage book reviews,  I also encourage book reviews but will be
vigilant about "hidden agendas."

New on the SHAKSPER Fileserver: HIGH_LOW CULTURE

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0022. Tuesday, 9 January 1996.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, January 9, 1996
Subject:        New on the SHAKSPER Fileserver: HIGH_LOW CULTURE

As of today, SHAKSPEReans may retrieve Harry Hill's "The Mixture of "High" and
"Low" Culture in Hamlet I,i: a Close Reading" (HIGH_LOW CULTURE) from the
SHAKSPER Fileserver.  This paper was delivered at Popular Culture Association
Meeting in Syracuse, NY, on November 2nd 1995

To retrieve "The Mixture of "High" and "Low" Culture in Hamlet I,i: a Close
Reading," send a one-line mail message (without a subject line) to
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., reading "GET HIGH_LOW CULTURE".

Should you have difficulty receiving this or any of the files on the SHAKSPER
Fileserver, please contact the editor at <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> or
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.

*******************************************************************************
The Mixture of "High" and "Low" Culture in Hamlet I,i: a Close Reading

     It was Oscar Wilde who best said that the people have to be brought up to
the level of art. As with many of his utterances, he probably had Shakespeare
in mind. Clearly, Shakespeare's perennial success as a popular playwright has
to do with his mastery of levels and his ability to inveigle the common
spectator into his worlds, and then, in a sense that I shall demonstrate, up to
his people's reactions to those worlds. This paper is based on the assumption
that popular culture is not folk culture but low culture elevated to high. And
in Shakespeare's case it is mostly his negative capability, his refusal to take
political positions or to write in either the overwrought or too plain styles
of most of his contemporaries that makes and keeps his art popular. Mostly, it
is his negative capability in the sense of empathy that does this. His hearing
the way people speak, and his feeling the way they think..which he can
reproduce in metaphor and verbal texture.

     The line that famously opens Hamlet with a question is more than that. It
is a contraction, "Who's there?", that may also be seen to introduce
stylistically and therefore tonally the earthbound ordinariness of its
characters, the sentries of Elsinore, before elevating their perceptions to a
more intellectually ethereal level. To this latter level the characters are
forced in this scene by their reactions to events.

     I use "high and low culture" as ways of describing the modes and levels of
speech, which are of course outward and visible emblems of inner states.

Re: McKellen's R3; Matus

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0020. Monday, 8 January 1996.

(1)     From:   Laura Blanchard <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 6 Jan 1996 23:23:00 -0500
        Subj:   McKellen's R3

(2)     From:   Christine R. Gray <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 8 Jan 1996 13:19:20 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0007 Qs: Matus


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Laura Blanchard <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 6 Jan 1996 23:23:00 -0500
Subject:        McKellen's R3

The kind folks at Mayfair Entertainment International responded generously to
my request for information on the film to put on the Society's Web site, so I
have a number of photographs, cast list, production notes and interview with
Sir Ian McKellen mounted there. For those of you who may be interested, the URL
is

http://www.webcom.com/blanchrd/mckellen/film/homepage.html

Our server has had some sporadic problems with slow loading recently, so I
apologize in advance if you have difficulty reaching the site. I understand the
film will open January 19 here in Philadelphia; of course, it has been playing
in New York since late last month. It's an interesting film -- I enjoyed it.

Regards,
Laura Blanchard
Richard III Society, American Branch

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine R. Gray <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 8 Jan 1996 13:19:20 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 7.0007 Qs: Matus
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0007 Qs: Matus

The best way to reach Irv Matus is probably through the Folger.  More than
likely he has a mailbox there.  christine gray

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