1996

LISTSERV Commands

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0004. Friday, 5 January 1996.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, January 5, 1996
Subject:        LISTSERV Commands

Dear SHASKPEReans,

As I indicated yesterday, I am only just discovering that LISTSERV works quite
differently under UNIX on a workstation than it does under VM on a mainframe.
I've been on-line almost constantly -- with an interruption for some sleep --
since yesterday morning, trying to get as much of SHAKSPER operable as I can.

As I also indicated, some functions and commands do NOT work under UNIX that
did under VM.  Unfortunately, for the time being, we will not have the DATABASE
FUNCTION (bad for all of us), and I will not have the GIVE command (bad for
my ability to quickly assist you with ordering a file).  Nor will we have the
use of mail packages (also bad for my distributing introductory files to new
members).  However, much the rest will all appear the same to you all as end
users.

I am including below a list of basic LISTSERV commands for your use.  In the
next post, I'm send you a copy of the SHAKSPER FILES file, which has also
has instructions for ordering files from the SHAKSPER Fileserver.  I'm made
about 75% of the files available now and will continue working on the remaining
ones -- UNIX requires these files be in lower case, but they all arrived from
the University of Toronto in capitals, and there's no quick fix for this
problem.

I did manage to clear up about 70 of the 100 or so SHAKSPER messages that have
been collecting in my mailbox and will strive to catch up on the postings I
have not sent out as quickly as I can.  Then maybe I can get back to my ISA
project before I'm called back for other university duties.

--Hardy

******************************************************************************
                        Basic LISTSERV Commands

Below you will find a set of basic LISTSERV commands.  REMEMBER, all of these
commands should be sent to the LISTSERV Address -- This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
-- NOT to the LIST Address -- This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
   ^^^

___________________________________     ____________________________________
If you want to do the following, to     Send this in a one-line mail message
-----------------------------------     ------------------------------------

Subscribe                               SUB SHAKSPER FirstName LastName
Unsubscribe                             SIGNOFF SHAKSPER

Stop SHAKSPER Mailings Temporarily      SET SHAKSPER NOMAIL
Restart SHAKSPER Mailings               SET SHAKSPER MAIL
Change TO a Single Daily Digest         SET SHAKSPER DIGEST
Change FROM Digest TO Regular Mailings  SET SHAKSPER INDEX

Receive Confirmation of Your Posting    SET SHAKSPER REPRO
See Your SHAKSPER Options               QUERY SHAKSPER

Get a Listing of All Commands           HELP

Get a List of All Subscribers           GET SHAKSPER FILE or
                                        REVIEW SHAKSPER BY NAME or
                                        REVIEW SHAKSPER or
                                        REVIEW SHAKSPER COUNTRY

Get a List of Files on Fileserver       GET SHAKSPER FILES

Get a File from the Fileserver          GET Filetype Filename

Get SHAKSPER Guide                      GET SHAKSPER GUIDE

Get Log of Previous Discussions         GET SHAKSPER LOG9601a
                                        (This example gets log of first week
                                         of January 1996 Discussions)

Note that these commands are NOT "case-sensitive."  In other words, LISTSERV
doesn't care WHAT case you use, just the characters used.

Abhorson; Voice-over Hamlet?; Renaissance typefaces

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0003. Thursday, 4 January 1996.

(1)     From:   David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 12 Dec 1995 22:35:27 GMT
        Subj:   Re: Abhorson

(2)     From:   Greg Grainger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 12 Dec 1995 18:25:37 -0500
        Subj:   Voice-over Hamlet?

(3)     From:   James Schaefer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 12 Dec 1995 22:49:09 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   RE:  pantomime *Hamlet*

(4)     From:   Peter Guither <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 13 Dec 1995 12:53:06 -0600
        Subj:   Re: Renaissance typefaces


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 12 Dec 1995 22:35:27 GMT
Subject:        Re: Abhorson

I've no bright new reading of Abhorson's strained syllogism - but it's possible
that in calling his trade a 'mystery' he is meaning a little more than
'profession' - the gloss preferred by Gibbons and accepted by others.  Richard
van Dulmen, in _Theatre of Horror_ (Polity Press, 1990) pp. 65-70, writes  very
interestingly of the ways in which, at least in Germany, the executioner was
both reviled for his trade, and yet at the same time 'believed to be endowed
with almost magical healing powers'. He concludes  that he was considered
'uncanny, but also beneficial'. I don't know if there is any parallel for these
beliefs in early modern England - but would be interested to find out.

David Lindley

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Greg Grainger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 12 Dec 1995 18:25:37 -0500
Subject:        Voice-over Hamlet?

On December 11, Michael Friedman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> wrote:

> I started to wonder
> about *To be or not to be*.  If, as it has been asserted, most audiences know
> it so well by now that they hardly pay attention to the words, does the actor
> even need to speak the lines?  What would happen if he just thought them?  Not
> with a voice-over, but silently, in his own head, accompanied by only those
> gestures that a person, lost in agitated thought, might make.

Didn't Mel Gibson do just this in his film version of Hamlet?


(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Schaefer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 12 Dec 1995 22:49:09 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        RE:  pantomime *Hamlet*

What Michael Friedman describes sounds like a silent-film version of the play,
with an occasional dialogue card ("There's the rub!").  I must assume that
silent-era directors tried to film Shakespeare -- a totally boggling concept!
-- and that they did not put all 4,000 lines of text on the screen.  Has anyone
seen such films, and do they bear any relationship to Friedman's proposal for
dealing with "To be...."?

Jim Schaefer
Georgetown University

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Guither <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 13 Dec 1995 12:53:06 -0600
Subject:        Re: Renaissance typefaces

The Illinois Shakespeare Festival has finally finished a working version of a
font based on Shakespeare's Folio.

The main structure of this font will work best for limited use (it's great for
display work, like the titles of the plays). In order to have a font that had
some additional value, however, we added some characters to aid in its use for
text. Because it was expected that its use would be greater for titles or
display work, it has a more oblique feel than most of the text in the folio and
some of the caps are a little fancy for that use (more like the italics used
for songs or character names), but it still can work for text.

In addition to the full set of upper and lower case letters, the font does
contain two alternate versions of the lower case "s", one alternate of upper
case "A", ligatures for "sh" and "ct" and some standard punctuation. The "read
me" file contains some tips for using the alternate "s" versions.

This should be considered a first version. With your feedback, we will attempt
to fine-tune and add for future releases. Are there additional ligatures which
would be useful? Should we have a second, non-oblique font that would be used
for straight text? Are there other punctuation marks or symbols that are
needed? Please let us know.

Michael Scott Mann (a student at Illinois State University) did all the heavy
lifting on this font and created the bulk of it, while I added ligatures,
alternate characters, some refinements and finishing work.

This font is Freeware. The Illinois Shakespeare Festival retains the rights to
the font, but you may distribute and use it freely as long as it is not sold or
altered and the "read me" file is included.

The font is called "ILShakeFest"  --  Wouldn't "FolioFont" or "Shakespeare"
have been more appropriate? Probably. But that's what you pay for a free font.
We get a little publicity. Fair trade?

I uploaded the Mac version of the font to America Online a few days ago and it
has been selected as "Font of the Week."  It is available there in the "New
Uploads" section of "Desktop Publishing."   The PC version will be uploaded
within the week.

Both PC/Windows and Mac versions of the font are available at our web site:
http://orathost.cfa.ilstu.edu/isf.html which also includes a graphic image of
the font.  Both versions include both Type 1 and Truetype fonts.  The PC
version is ".zip" and the Mac version is ".sit.hqx" so you'll need the proper
utilities for de-compressing. (stuffit expander for the Mac will work just
fine, and any unzipping program for the PC)  If any Shaksper members have
trouble getting files from the web, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
and I'll be happy to send the appropriate version to you.

Hope you find it useful, and I await your comments, suggestions and critiques!

Peter Guither
General Manager, Illinois Shakespeare Festival

SHAKSPER Is Back

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0001.  Thursday, 4 January 1996.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, January 4, 1996
Subject:        SHAKSPER Is Back: Bowie State Welcomes the Members of SHAKSPER


Dear SHAKSPEReans:

SHAKSPER's move from the University of Toronto to Bowie State is now partially
complete. Needless to say, we discovered more problems than we had expected
before the Christmas break; after that the University was virtually closed
until after New Year's; after that we discovered we had made several mistakes;
and thus the long interruption in service.  However, most appears well now.

As a reminder, the new list address is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., while
LISTSERV is now This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  Please make note of both these
addresses.

The basic procedures remain the same.  Mail your submissions either to the list
address This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or directly to me This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.,
but please give me a few days to catch up. Remember, SHAKSPER is moderated, so
all submission come to me before I edit them into digests and send them out to
you.

As it turns out, LISTSERV works quite differently on UNIX than it does under
VM.  As a result, I am in the process of completely redoing the Filelist.
This means that many LISTSERV command will not work at the present and
as I just found out some command, such as the DATABASE FUNCTION, will not
work at all.  It's going to take some time for me to work through the
backup of submissions, get the fileserver set up, re-do most of the explanatory
files, learn about UNIX, and somehow get my ISA preparation together.  Please
bear with me.

I would, however, like to express my deepest appreciation to Steve Younker, the
LISTSERV Maintainer at the University of Toronto and to the University of
Toronto for hosting SHAKSPER since its birth in July 1990 and for assisting me
when I took over as SHAKSPER's editor.  Thanks, Steve.

I would also like to thank Jerry Rossignuolo, the System Administrator at
Bowie State University's Computer Science Department.  Jerry undertook the
technical end of the move down here; no small task indeed.  Thanks, Jerry.  He
and I will be maintaining LISTSERV and SHAKSPER at Bowie State, and we have
many plans for placing the past years logs on our gopher server and setting up
a SHAKSPER WWW site.

Here is the new SHAKSPER announcement for you information:

*******************************************************************************


                               S H A K S P E R:
                The Global Electronic Shakespeare Conference


SHAKSPER is the international electronic conference for Shakespearean
researchers, instructors, students, and those who share their academic
interests and concerns.  It currently includes more than 1100 SHAKSPEReans
(many of whom are prominent in the field), from Australia, Austria, Belgium,
Brazil, Canada, Denmark, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain,
Greece, Iceland, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, The
Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Romania, South Africa, Spain,
Switzerland, Turkey, and the United States.

Like the national and international Shakespeare Association conferences,
SHAKSPER offers announcements and bulletins, scholarly papers, and the formal
exchange of ideas -- but SHAKSPER also offers on-going opportunities for
spontaneous informal discussion, eavesdropping, peer review, and a sense of
worldwide scholarly community.  In addition, the SHAKSPER Fileserver offers
conference papers and abstracts, an International Directory of Shakespeare
Institutes, biographies of conference members, and a variety of announcements,
texts, and bibliographies.

The daily SHAKSPER digests are organized by subject for the reader's
convenience.  SHAKSPER digests include conference announcements, member notes
and queries, book and theatre reviews, textual debate, discussion of lecture
strategies, and much more.

Technically, SHAKSPER is a LISTSERV "list" running under UNIX on an Sun work
station (a Sparc 4, running Solaris 2.5) at Bowie State University in Bowie,
Maryland.  The list editor, Hardy M. Cook, is a Professor of English at Bowie
State University and can be contacted at <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> or
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.

No academic qualifications are required for membership in SHAKSPER, and anyone
interested in English Literature, the Renaissance, or Drama is welcome to join
us.  Write to the editor -- This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. -- or send a one-line
e-mail message, reading "SUB SHAKSPER firstname lastname" to
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and you will receive detailed information with
further instructions for becoming a SHAKSPERean.

[SHAKSPER is edited/moderated and is not open to automatic subscription.]

Re: Development of Individualism

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0002. Thursday, 4 January 1996.

(1)     From:   Joanne Woolway <joanne.woolway%oriel.oxford.ac.uk@ukacrl>
        Date:   Wednesday, 13 Dec 1995 12:06:45 +0000 (GMT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0960 Q: Development of Individualism

(2)     From:   Ton Hoenselaars <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 13 Dec 1995 14:59:35 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   RE: SHK 6.0960  Q: Development of Individualism;

(3)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 13 Dec 1995 09:56:52 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0960  Q: Development of Individualism

(4)     From:   Jesus Cora <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 13 Dec 1995 18:42:55 UTC+0200
        Subj:   SHK 6.0960  Q: Development of Individualism;

(5)     From:   Kezia Vanmeter Sproat <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 14 Dec 1995 08:49:05 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0960 Q: Development of Individualism


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joanne Woolway <joanne.woolway%oriel.oxford.ac.uk@ukacrl>
Date:           Wednesday, 13 Dec 1995 12:06:45 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: 6.0960 Q: Development of Individualism
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0960 Q: Development of Individualism

For Jesus Cora-

Re: individualism and theatre.

I suggest you try Katharine Eisman Maus's Inwardness and Theater in the English
Renaissance (Chicago UP, 1995). There's a review of it in Early Modern Literary
Studies - http://unixg.ubc.ca:7001/0/e-sources/emls/emlshome.html

Joanne Woolway

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ton Hoenselaars <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 13 Dec 1995 14:59:35 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 6.0960  Q: Development of Individualism;
Comment:        RE: SHK 6.0960  Q: Development of Individualism;

Dear Jesus Cora, there should be a great deal of interest in Catherine Belsey's
*The Subject of Tragedy*. Her pages on *Hamlet* might prove particularly
stimulating.
                               Ton Hoenselaars, Utrecht University

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 13 Dec 1995 09:56:52 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0960  Q: Development of Individualism
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0960  Q: Development of Individualism

Jesus Cora writes:

>I am very interested in the development of individualism and self-consciousness
>during the first part of the 17th century and its influence on the drama of the
>period. Could you kindly recommend bibliography on the subject? I am specially
>interested on the parallel development of self-conciousness and self-reference
>in drama (you know, metatheatre and metadrama).

Since I was a young boy, I've heard the assertion that individualism and
self-consciousness did not exist before a period vaguely defined as the
Renaissance.  One reason for this assertion was unsigned works of art in a
period vaguely defined as the Middle Ages.  But, of course, there are plenty of
signed works of art in this amorphous period: Boethius, Dante, Chaucer, not to
mention the dead white female Europeans like Heloise and Christine de Pisan.
And there was plenty of individualism and self-consciousness in the
Graeco-Roman period.  Would we say that Socrates was not self-conscious? That
Gaius Julius Caesar was not individualistic?  And Cleopatra? Plutarch?

I realize that we are here dealing with subjectivity -- impossible to isolate
and analyze in the laboratory.  But isn't it just possible that individualism
and self-conscious subjectivity (is there another kind?) are part of what
defines us as an animal species? Or is it even possible that all mammals are
self-conscious individualists?  I realize that Montaigne contemplated these
questions in the 16th century.  (My cat just jumped into my lap!)

Yours, Bill Godshalk

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jesus Cora <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 13 Dec 1995 18:42:55 UTC+0200
Subject: Q: Development of Individualism;
Comment:        SHK 6.0960  Q: Development of Individualism;

Dear Shakespeareans,

On reading my e-mail, especially
        1) the discussion on soliloquies and the question of whether they must
        be interpreted as the expression of inner thought, and
        2) my own query about the development of self-consciousness in early
        modern England,
it has occurred to me that soliloquies "must need" reflect the interest in
self-consciousness and inner-life of individuals that developed in early modern
England. Therefore, in consonance with this interest, soliloquies must not have
been delivered, so to speak, "looking the audience in the eye", but in a more
detached way, as a "private" expression of the inner-self. I know that the
conditions of performance in The Globe or other amphitheatres would not favour
such practice, but, on the other hand, I think that Elizabethans would
perfectly understand such procedure. Direct address to the audience belongs to
the early mysteries, moralities and interludes, when the conventions and
mechanics of drama were not so sophisticated.

Yours,
Jesus Cora
Universidad de Alcala de Henares.

(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kezia Vanmeter Sproat <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 14 Dec 1995 08:49:05 -0500
Subject: 6.0960 Q: Development of Individualism
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0960 Q: Development of Individualism

My late friend Rolf Soellner wrote a book, Shakespeare's Patterns of
Self-Knowledge, published in 1972. It might be a good start.

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