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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: March ::
They Once Were Lost But Now They're Found
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0151.  Saturday, 2 March 1996.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <
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Date:           Saturday, March 2, 1996
Subject:        They Once Were Lost But Now They're Found


SHAKSPEReans:

SHAKSPER's move has not been without its difficulties.  The initial setup was
far more complicated than the System Manager and I had expected.  Then I
discovered that the Unix version of LISTSERV does not as yet include all of the
commands of the VM versions that I was used to, so I have had to reconsider
some of the procedures I have used to run the conference.  To top it off, Bowie
State is undergoing a technological makeover of enormous proportions.  The
System Manager has been preoccupied with setting up to new computer
laboratories funded from a multi-million dollars NSA grant, while the entire
campus is being wired for a client-sever environment.  I have been virtually on
my own handling technical problems -- Oh the Unix I have had to learn.  We
still have not solved the addressing problem that some of us have, but I hope
the fix will be in soon.  Further, some posting have gotten lost.  Below are
two that I have just recovered.

Struggling along,
Hardy

*******************************************************************************

(1)     From:   Chris Fassler <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 16 Jan 1996 10:37:46 -0500
        Subj:   Development of Individualism

(2)     From:   Albert Misseldine <
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        Date:   Friday, 23 Feb 1996 09:51:22 -0500
        Subj:   Macbeth detail


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Fassler <
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Date:           Tuesday, 16 Jan 1996 10:37:46 -0500
Subject:        Development of Individualism

Colleagues,

This question first interested me at grad school while we were discussing the
play-within-the-play from _Hamlet_, specifically Gertrude's remarks about the
player queen's sincerety in professing her faithfulness to the player king.  At
some point in the conversation, I began thinking about Decartes, and this
question occured to me:  what if an early modern writer had translated "Cogito
ergo sum" as "Methinks; therefore I am"?  Or, alternatively, what if Gertrude
says, "I think she's full of it"?

The hypothetical translation is probably absurd, but my question about such
reflexive (correct term?) constructions remains.  "Methinks" and similar
constructions in earlier English, in classical Latin, and in modern Russian--to
name a few examples--seem to me to challenge most of our most cherished notions
of selfhood, not to mention what thought and thinkers are.

Until this strand began on SHAKSPER, the question of Decartes remained a
memory.

Now I'm interested again.  Anyone else?

Sincerely,
Chris Fassler, Winthrop University

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Albert Misseldine <
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Date:           Friday, 23 Feb 1996 09:51:22 -0500
Subject:        Macbeth detail

Query: What is the doctor in the sleepwalking scene using to take notes with?
He can't be carrying a quill and ink, can he? Cheers.
 

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