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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: March ::
Re: Pen/Ink; Methinks; Plays; Educational Videos
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0161.  Monday, 4 March 1996.

(1)     From:   Helen Ostovich <
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        Date:   Saturday, 2 Mar 1996 11:36:16 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   RE:  Albert Misseldine's query about pen and ink

(2)     From:   Surajit Bose <
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        Date:   Saturday, 2 Mar 1996 14:36:44 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0151 They Once Were Lost But Now They're Found

(3)     From:   Jerry Bangham <
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        Date:   Sunday, 03 Mar 1996 15:45:33
        Subj:   Plays attributed to Shakespeare

(4)     From:   Rick Kincaid <
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        Date:   Sunday, 03 Mar 1996 16:00:24
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0155  Re: Educational Videos


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <
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Date:           Saturday, 2 Mar 1996 11:36:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        RE:  Albert Misseldine's query about pen and ink

Yes, portable pen sets were available, and mentioned in Jonson's *Epicoene*
5.1.13 ff.  Mavis requests pen and ink, and Daw says he can "furnish" her:
Clerimont explains, "He has it in the haft of a knife, I believe", but Lafoole
corrects him:  "No, he has his box of instuments", containing mathematical
tools, and "brass pens, and black lead, to draw maps of every place, and
person, where he comes".  So perhaps the doctor was taking notes with an early
form of pencil, as described here.

Helen Ostovich
Department of English / Editor, _REED Newsletter_
McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada  L8S 4L9

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Surajit Bose <
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Date:           Saturday, 2 Mar 1996 14:36:44 -0500
Subject: 7.0151 They Once Were Lost But Now They're Found
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0151 They Once Were Lost But Now They're Found

Chris Fassler asks:

>what if an early modern writer had translated "Cogito
>ergo sum" as "Methinks; therefore I am"?  Or, alternatively, what if Gertrude
>says, "I think she's full of it"?

This is a fascinating idea, but alas! as Thomas Huxley said, "the great tragedy
of science is the slaying of a beautiful hypothesis by an ugly fact."  Since
Rene Descartes was born in 1596, he would have been only around five when
Hamlet was written.

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jerry Bangham <
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Date:           Sunday, 03 Mar 1996 15:45:33
Subject:        Plays attributed to Shakespeare

The 1966,  Issue 1 of "Theatre Record" has several reviews of Olly Figg's
"Contested Will" at the Etcetera Theatre in London.  The play deals with
William Ireland's "Vortigern and Rowena" which Ireland claimed was a lost
Shakespearean manuscript.

The play was produced at Drury Lane, but only for one performance. There was
evidently little doubt in the audience's minds about the authenticity of the
script.

One review quotes program notes referring to Shakespeare as a "scared cow."

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rick Kincaid <
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Date:           Sunday, 03 Mar 1996 16:00:24
Subject: 7.0155  Re: Educational Videos
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0155  Re: Educational Videos

I definitely have to agree with Jeff Kean. John Barton's "Playing Shakespeare"
could easily be used to introduce Shakespeare to a young audience. I have to
admit this series brought Shakespeare's words to life for me. Before that, I
just didn't get it, I didn't enjoy reading it, and I hadn't a clue how to act
it.Perhaps it's because my English teachers, as much as the adored his words,
chose to forget or ignore the fact that Shakespeare was written to be
performed.

John Barton forces the actors to find the vitality of the text. And they talk
through it and pose questions that a teacher can use to involve  his/her
students. And the students will enjoy watching famous actors such as Patrick
Stewart, Ben Kingsey, Ian McCellen, and Roger Reese (I know that's not the
correct spelling of his last name, but they'll recognize him as Rebecca's
fiance on "Cheers") being "taught at."

Rick
 

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