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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: March ::
Re: Pens and Pencils
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0174.  Wednesday, 6 March 1996.

(1)     From:   Russell Meyer <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 05 Mar 1996 15:26:41 -0600
        Subj:   Pen/Ink -Reply

(2)     From:   John Mucci <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 5 Mar 1996 19:52:45 -0500
        Subj:   Pen & ink


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Russell Meyer <
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Date:           Tuesday, 05 Mar 1996 15:26:41 -0600
Subject:        Pen/Ink -Reply

Stephanie Hughes is right: pencils came into use in England in 1500 and were
first manufactured there in 1565, so there's little need for a Renaissance Bic
to take notes.

Russ Meyer
Emporia State University

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Mucci <
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Date:           Tuesday, 5 Mar 1996 19:52:45 -0500
Subject:        Pen & ink

Ink horns were a very common accoutrement for a scribe, which were worn either
slung around the waist or worn around the neck. In the videotape of Bride
Media's CDRom *Macbeth*, the Doctor makes use of the inkhorn and quill during
the sleepwalking scene.

As for pencils, the annotations in the Folger's DeVere Bible are partially
written in pencil.  What I am amazed at is the idea that pen *nibs* were
available at the time (itemized in de Vere's purchase with the Bible), which
I'd have thought was much later. After all-- where did you put the nib?  In the
quill?

As an aside, I always find it interesting to see in period films that
characters use quills with feathers on them; in most books on calligraphy and
writing with pen and ink, one of the first instructions is to remove the
feathers, which tend to get in the way.

John Mucci
GTE VisNet
 

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