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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: March ::
Re: Othello, a Christian?
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0179.  Thursday, 7 March 1996.

(1)     From:   Christine Jacobson <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 06 Mar 1996 20:28:42 -0700 (MST)
        Subj:   Othello, a Christian?

(2)     From:   Florence Amit <
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        Date:   Thursday, 07 Mar 1996 18:40:20 +0200
        Subj:   Re.: A Jewish Othello


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Jacobson <
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Date:           Wednesday, 06 Mar 1996 20:28:42 -0700 (MST)
Subject:        Othello, a Christian?

This is in reply to Tunis Romein's posting asking the question as to whether or
not Othello was actually a Christian.

First of all, I agree wholeheartedly with D. Vittus's reply of March 2, 1996,
in which he points out Othello's quote just before her stabs himself to
de(death) at the end of the play and interprets it as Othello killing himself
as a "Turk".  Indeed, Othello sees himself as barbaric as the Turks he has
slain.  He has thrown away a "pearl" and can no longer consider himself a
Christian.  Also, it might be interesting to note that in the screenplay for
the latest movie called "Othello", the screenwriter has Othello, Desdemona and
Cassio standing before a priest on the ceremony of their wedding.  This movie
opens with that scene.  Therefore, the screenwriter also feels it necessary to
portray Othello as a Christian, does he not, as a non-Christian could not be
permitted to a marriage with a Christian Desdemona in front of a priest.  Do
you agree?  Wasn't  the Christian church similar in its approach to mixed
marriages in Elizabethean times as it is today?  I have been considering this
in the light of a Catholique (Christian) code of marriage rites as the setting
for the play is Venice.

Christine Jacobson, Medicine Hat College, Alberta, Canada.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Florence Amit <
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Date:           Thursday, 07 Mar 1996 18:40:20 +0200
Subject:        Re.: A Jewish Othello

Concerning the Hebrew masculine ending of Othello: The O is in Hebrew a Vav
which has various pronounciations and Rebecca Shapiro is right, it is an 'O'
only on paper in the case of the ending of Othello. If it were pronounced it
might probably be preceded by a yod and sound like 'ov'. Still there are
instances where the vav is a pronounced 'O'in an ending, like 'shello' meaning
belonging to him or 'mimeno' meaning from him.

                                                    Florence Amit
 

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