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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: March ::
Re: About This List; Music/Political Power
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0209.  Friday, 15 March 1996.

(1)     From:   Todd M. Lidh <
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        Date:   Thursday, 14 Mar 1996 12:12:36 -0500
        Subj:   About This List

(2)     From:   Robin Headlam Wells <
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        Date:   Thursday, 14 Mar 1996 17:11:43 +0000 (GMT)
        Subj:   Re: Q: Music/Political Power


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Todd M. Lidh <
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Date:           Thursday, 14 Mar 1996 12:12:36 -0500
Subject:        About This List

I have to take some exception with what has been said about this "new list"
which will somehow avoid such things as "Questions that are obviously from
undergrads fishing for ideas (also called plagiarism)." While I'm not condoning
plagiarism (please), I can safely say that undergrads have been the minority
when it comes to fishing for ideas on SHAKSPER.

After all, hardly a day goes by when someone does not post asking for feedback,
bibliographical recommendation, or outright help on a particular topic. These
have ranged from the performing of older female characters to Welsh
characterizations in Shakespeare's plays.

If we are not free to do this kind of collegiate interaction without the
spectre of plagiarism being cast over it all, where does one go for such
interactivity? It seems to me that this very concept is part of what instigated
the formation of SHAKSPER in the first place.

Also, how do we choose to define "excessive discussion on a topic?" Number of
posts? What if the discussion is ground-breaking? Or just interesting? Who
decides? Or, will it be decided which topics merit longer discussions?

Is no one else trouble by what that implies?

I don't mean to sound reactionary or blow things out of proportion ("shoot from
the hip," as it were), but I do wonder about the motivation behind this
movement to form a new and better list, one "free" from these annoyances of
true interactive discussion.

Todd M. Lidh
UNC-Chapel Hill

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Headlam Wells <
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Date:           Thursday, 14 Mar 1996 17:11:43 +0000 (GMT)
Subject:        Re: Q: Music/Political Power

On Thu, 14 Mar 1996, Cherrie Gottesleben wrote:

> Hello all,
>
> I'm thinking of a graduate thesis that links the power of music with political
> power in the English Renaissance.  Speech and rhetoric -- language and its
> emotional tones might somehow be the bridge. If anyone can supply some
> bibliographic information it would be welcome. Thanks!
>
Dear Cherrie,

May I immodestly offer my own book, *Elizabethan Mythologies* (Cambridge
University Press, 1994). It deals, amongst other things, with music as part of
the process of political myth making. But I should warn you that it's a bit
rude about some Cultural Materialist and New Historicist myth making.

Good luck with your dissertation.

Robin Headlam Wells, Editor, Renaissance Forum, Department of English,
University of Hull, Hull, HU6 7RX, UK
 

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