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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: March ::
Re: Music; Older Female Characters; Bardolatry
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0219.  Saturday, 16 March 1996.

(1)     From:   Cherrie Gottsleben <
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        Date:   Friday, 15 Mar 1996 14:13:11 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0209 Re: Music/Political Power

(2)     From:   David Carnegie <
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 >
        Date:   Saturday, 16 Mar 1996 11:23:40 +1200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0208  Older Female Characters and Early Modern Acting

(3)     From:   Bill Day <
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        Date:   Friday, 15 Mar 1996 18:06:23 -0500
        Subj:   Bardolatry


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cherrie Gottsleben <
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 >
Date:           Friday, 15 Mar 1996 14:13:11 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 7.0209 Re: Music/Political Power
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0209 Re: Music/Political Power

MANY thanks to those of you who suggested sources and rendered helpful
information concerning my research on music and political power in the English
Renaissance!  I shall inform you of my progress.  If any new information pops
up please let me know.

Thanks again
Cherrie

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Carnegie <
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 >
Date:           Saturday, 16 Mar 1996 11:23:40 +1200
Subject: 7.0208  Older Female Characters and Early Modern Acting
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0208  Older Female Characters and Early Modern Acting

Dick Robinson's age:  in reply to Helen Ostovich, Robinson is known to have
been playing women's roles for the King's Men as early as 1611, including The
Lady in *The Second Maiden's Tragedy*, and, I think likely, the Duchess in *The
Duchess of Malfi* in 1613 or 1614.  By 1619 he had become a sharer, and was
playing men's roles.

David Carnegie, Department of Theatre & Film
Victoria University of Wellington

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Day <
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Date:           Friday, 15 Mar 1996 18:06:23 -0500
Subject:        Bardolatry

Bernice W. Kliman <
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 > writes:

>I have heard that it was G. B. Shaw, who was NOT a bardolater. The OED, anyway,
>credits him with the 1st--and multiple uses of the word--starting in 1901.

No, not a bardolater. Nevertheless, he arguably had as great a knowledge and
love of Shakespeare as any SHAKSPERian.  Michael Holroyd in his biography
points out that Shaw had memorized several of Shakespeare's plays before he
reached adulthood.  Although Holroyd suggests that Shaw may have been put off
by the robust sexuality in Shakespeare's plays, he attributes Shaw's printed
assaults on "the Bard" mainly to theater politics and Shaw's larger assault on
Victorian snobbery and the conventions of the Victorian theater.

Bill Day

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