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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: March ::
Re: Physical Size of Elizabethans
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0229.  Wednesday, 20 March 1996.

(1)     From:   Florence Amit <
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        Date:   Monday, 18 Mar 1996 01:06:04 +0200
        Subj:   Re: Size of Elizabethans

(2)     From:   Andrew Gurr <
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        Date:   Monday, 18 Mar 1996 10:12:07 +0000 (GMT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0210 Q: Physical Size of Elizabethans


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Florence Amit <
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Date:           Monday, 18 Mar 1996 01:06:04 +0200
Subject:        Re: Size of Elizabethans

> I'd therefore expect average stature to have generally increased
>with wealth/social status, and would be interested to know of any evidence,
>literary or otherwise, that this was so.

To Ann Chance:

Isn't also the amount of calcium in the diet crucial? And what about wet nurses
who had few children vs. aristocratic ladies who had too many births? One would
suppose that the yoeman's child has the advantage here.

                                                             Florence Amit

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Gurr <
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Date:           Monday, 18 Mar 1996 10:12:07 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: 7.0210 Q: Physical Size of Elizabethans
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0210 Q: Physical Size of Elizabethans

Measurements of skeletons give the average size of Tudor figures as 10% less
than the modern (western) average. But there are anomalies -- the Tudor seamen
on the Mary Rose when raised in 1984 turned out to be about the modern average.
Whether they benefitted from a better diet (the main cause of size difference,
allowing for a potato-free diet before 1600) in royal employ, or whether Henry
VIII wanted big men on his ship, we don't know.

Andrew Gurr
 

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