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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: March ::
Re: R3; Character; Future; Film Course
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0230.  Wednesday, 20 March 1996.

(1)     From:   Fran Teague <
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        Date:   Monday, 18 Mar 96 09:46:15 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0224  Re: *R3* Spinoffs

(2)     From:   Joseph M Green <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 19 Mar 1996 16:42:44 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0153  Re: Characters

(3)     From:   Stephanie Hughes <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 19 Mar 1996 20:47:32 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0226  Re: The Future

(4)     From:   Susanne Collier <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 19 Mar 1996 18:34:46 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0218 Qs: Film Course


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fran Teague <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 18 Mar 96 09:46:15 EST
Subject: 7.0224  Re: *R3* Spinoffs
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0224  Re: *R3* Spinoffs

Two films that use R3: The Goodbye Girl and Theatre of Blood. In the former,
there is mockery of a production that presents R3 as gay; the second uses Shn.
references as the base for a serious of ghoulish murders and features an
over-the-top Vincent Price.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joseph M Green <
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Date:           Tuesday, 19 Mar 1996 16:42:44 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 7.0153  Re: Characters
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0153  Re: Characters

John Drakakis writes that the idea of "character" is an anachronism and
interferes with the real work of assessing Shakespeare's representations in
terms of, among other considerations?, ideology.  But if the concept of
character is anchronistic, so is the concept of ideology -- unless "ideology"
has assumed the status of a universal.  If Shakespeare's representations cannot
be said to be characters, then they cannot be said to be the product of
ideologies.  One follows the reasoning of T. Hawkes here -- by which it has
been demonstrated that Shakespeare could not have written "literature" because
it wasn't invented yet.  By the same reasoning one is excited to realize that
Shakespeare did not breath oxygen before it was named and that no-one before
the date given for the first use of "boredom" in the OED possibly have been
bored.

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephanie Hughes <
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Date:           Tuesday, 19 Mar 1996 20:47:32 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 7.0226  Re: The Future
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0226  Re: The Future

The Future of English

Harry Hill;

I agree that in teaching Shakespeare, and all literature, more time should be
spent reading and discussing the material and less in purveying theories of
various sorts. Far less lit crit, far more lit.

Stephanie Hughes

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Susanne Collier <
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Date:           Tuesday, 19 Mar 1996 18:34:46 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 7.0218 Qs: Film Course
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0218 Qs: Film Course

Methodology in constructing Shakespeare on Film courses:

Dave Evitt: I, too, teach at a commuter school, one which still evinces pockets
of post-earthquake stress syndrome, and have started to create a Shakespeare on
Film course in two different ways.  I have not yet developed a completely
satisfactory mechanism but can offer a couple of caveats.

1.  Watch the whole of an assigned video together in class because even if the
films are widely available (e.g. Mel Gibson as Hamlet), students cannot be
counted on to watch them on time.  Also, availability of soi-disant classic
video stores (or subsections of stores) varies widely even in this, the US
movie capital, creating a class-room culture of the elite students who
live/work near the useful rental stores and the others who don't.

2. Don't depend, unless you have a hold of blackmail proportions over your
library's media sector, on any out of class-room arrangements even if you can
be there in person, for me this has always ended in the proverbial tears.

After two tries and extensive student feedback I have resolved to choose fewer
Shakespeare plays; select the most obscure film versions to show in class and
assign to individuals or groups of two/three the more recent/generally
available videos for class presentations; offer incentives or structure the
final paper to allow for the unearthing of rare/ unconventional versions of a
play.

I shall certainly teach it again because it is, quite frankly, the most fun
I've had recently teaching a senior semiar.  The students love the course; I
have been considerably over-subscribed both times and I still get requests to
teach it again.

Happy Viewing!
 

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