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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: March ::
Re: RSC MND; The List; Dictionaries; ACTER Correction
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0240.  Tuesday, 26 March 1996.

(1)     From:   Richard Kincaid <
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        Date:   Monday, 25 Mar 1996 17:39:34
        Subj:   RSC Midsummmer...

(2)     From:   Jarrett Byrnes <
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        Date:   Monday, 25 Mar 1996 18:28:59 -0500
        Subj:   Re: About the list

(3)     From:   Nora Kreimer <
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        Date:   Monday, 25 Mar 1996 20:22:51 ARG
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0236  Re: Shakespeare's Vocabulary and OED Newsletter

(4)     From:   Cynthia Dessen <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 26 Mar 1996 06:20:15 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Correction for ACTER homepage address (fwd)


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Kincaid <
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Date:           Monday, 25 Mar 1996 17:39:34
Subject:        RSC Midsummmer...

For those of you in the NYC area: If you have the chance to see the RSC's A
Midsummer Night's Dream at the Lunt Fontane please do so. The production was
imaginative, sensual and humorous, the acting dead on. I thoroughly enjoyed it,
which was more than I expected, having seen it and done too many times myself.

And though it does capture the sensuality of the fairies and the lovers, it
isn't so overt that you'll be answering uncomfortable questions from your
children on the way home from the theater.

Cheers,
Rick Kincaid

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jarrett Byrnes <
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Date:           Monday, 25 Mar 1996 18:28:59 -0500
Subject:        Re: About the list

In response to what Shirley Kagan said- hi!  I'm a High School Junior with a
deep interest in Shakespeare, and have been joyously following the postings in
this list for the past several months.  Please, keep on with the discussion-
I'm listening.  BTW: If anyone has any interesting comments about Comedy of
Errors, please send them to me.  I'm about to start rehearsing for a production
next week.  Thanks, and I shall continue to enjoy your postings.

-Jarrett Byrnes

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nora Kreimer <
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Date:           Monday, 25 Mar 1996 20:22:51 ARG
Subject: 7.0236  Re: Shakespeare's Vocabulary and OED Newsletter
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0236  Re: Shakespeare's Vocabulary and OED Newsletter

Shakespeare's Dictionaries

Like most of us, I generally have these minor revelations that justify a
lifetime pouring over books and dictionaries. I used to feel it in my bones
that Shakespeare had a dictionary of some kind on his desk, when he was at
work. These fabulous hendiadys that fascinated me, eversince I was a child, a
foursome like"weary, stale, flat and unprofitable", "cabined, cribbed,
confined, bound in" always filled me with this wonder about a dictionary. It
isn't easy to come by info like this in my country, so I used to surprise and
amuse my students with the reference to an intuitive sight of the book on his
desk.

Among the first words I looked up in my own version of THE COMPACT OED  of
1991, was, naturally, the word dictionary and...eureka! I got the answer to my
queries.

DICTIONARY, ...
DICTIONARIUS was used c. 1225 by Joannes de Garlandia, a native of England, as
the title of a collection of Latin vocables arranged according to thier
subjects, in sentences, for the use of learners.

In the following century Peter Berchrius (died Paris 1362) wrote a DICTIONARIUM
MORALE UTRUISQUS TESTAMENTI for the use of students in theology.

In 1538 Thomas Elyot published his Latin-English "DICTIONARY"

1556 J.Withals published "A SHORT DICTIONARY FOR YONGE BEGINNERS" in English
and Latin, in which the owrds were arranged not alphabetically, but under
subject headings, e.g. "the names od Byrdes, Byrdes of the Water, Byrdes about
the house, as cockes, hennes, ets., of Bees, Flies and others.
......................
Dictionaries (so entitled) of English and various modern languages appaered in
England from 1547 onward; in the 17th c. the name was gradually extended to
words, only "hard words" being admitted into the English Dictionaries.
(continues)

So, there was one, after all. There were more than one! And they must have been
used for the two Bibles as well. I wish I could have a confirmation concerning
this, but I'm afraid to confess my epiphanies are restricted to Shakespeare.

Nora Kreimer
Buenos Aires
Argentina

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cynthia Dessen <
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Date:           Tuesday, 26 Mar 1996 06:20:15 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Correction for ACTER homepage address (fwd)

Thanks to all the eagle-eyed readers who noted the error in ACTER's new
homepage address. The correct address is: http://www.unc.edu/depts/acter (not
und - we are at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill).cynthia dessen,
general manager, ACTER
 

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