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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: March ::
Re: Vocabulary; Physical Size; ACTER in Phoenix
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0243.  Wednesday, 27 March 1996.

(1)     From:   Bruce Fenton <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 27 Mar 1996 08:27:59 -0500
        Subj:   Vocabulary

(2)     From:   Elizabeth Blye Schmitt <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 27 Mar 1996 09:41:06 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0210 Q: Physical Size of Elizabethans

(3)     From:   Cynthia Dessen <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 27 Mar 1996 06:14:23 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   ACTER in Phoenix


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bruce Fenton <
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Date:           Wednesday, 27 Mar 1996 08:27:59 -0500
Subject:        Vocabulary

It would be interesting to note that not only did Shakespeare use a very large
number of words but he used them in many different ways. I am curious if anyone
has vocabulary numbers  which reflect the various definitions of words in the
plays.  In other words, has anyone counted  each distinct definition or word
use style separately.

For example look how many different ways the word 'light' is used:

HAMLET
"I could a tale unfold who's lightest word..." Ghost
ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL
Act 2, Scene 1, In this my light deliverance, I have spoke
Act 3, Scene 4, That he does weigh too light: my greatest grief.
Act 4, Scene 2, If quick fire of youth light not your mind,
CYMBELINE
Act 1, Scene 6, Base and unlustrous as the smoky light
Act 3, Scene 1, for light; else, sir, no more tribute, pray you now.
LOVE'S LABOURS LOST
Act 1, Scene 1, To seek the light of truth; while truth the while
light seeking light doth light of light beguile:
So, ere you find where light in darkness lies,
Your light grows dark by losing of your eyes.
And give him light that it was blinded by.
Act 2, Scene 1, A woman sometimes, an you saw her in the light.
MEASURE FOR MEASURE
Act 4, Scene 3, With a light heart; trust not my holy order,
MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING
Act 2, Scene 1, You may light on a husband that hath no beard.
Act 4, Scene 1, Come, let us go. These things, come thus to light,
TROILUS AND CRESSIDA
Act 1, Scene 1,  I have, as when the sun doth light a storm,
Act 2, Scene 3, light boats sail swift, though greater hulks draw deep.
KING RICHARD III
Act 4, Scene 4,  Day, yield me not thy light; nor, night, thy rest!
Some light-foot friend post to the Duke of Norfolk:
1 KING HENRY IV
Act 3, Scene 2, Who, I? no; I defy thee: God's light, I was never
KING HENRY V
Act 2, Scene 2, Hath, for a few light crowns, lightly conspired,
Since God so graciously hath brought to light
Act 4, Scene 8, --a most contagious treason come to light, look
By this day and this light, the fellow has mettle
KING RICHARD II
Act 1, Scene 3, Then thus I turn me from my country's light,
My oil-dried lamp and time-bewasted light
The man that mocks at it and sets it light.
MACBETH
Act 1, Scene 4,  Let not light see my black and deep desires:
Act 3, Scene 2, Which keeps me pale! light thickens; and the crow

.......you get the idea.  My guess is that a count of this type would yield
something like 100,000 words.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Elizabeth Blye Schmitt <
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Date:           Wednesday, 27 Mar 1996 09:41:06 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 7.0210 Q: Physical Size of Elizabethans
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0210 Q: Physical Size of Elizabethans

An easy tangible reference, although it might require a field trip to the UK,
would be to show them the size of extant armor and clothing from the period.
Also anyone who has bumped their head on the beams of Shakespeare's birthplace
in Stratford can easily attest to the reduced stature of most Elizabethans.

Elizabeth Schmitt

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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cynthia Dessen <
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Date:           Wednesday, 27 Mar 1996 06:14:23 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        ACTER in Phoenix

ACTER has the possibility of performing in the Phoenix area in October 1996
with *Much Ado About Nothing* - if anyone on this list is at a college or
university in the area that might be able to share a week with another venue,
please contact cynthia dessen at 
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 . I am particularly
interested in anyone coming to the ISA, as I will be there at the ACTER
exhbition and we could discuss this. thanks, cynthia dessen, general manager,
ACTER
 

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