Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: April ::
Re: Funeral Elegy
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0252.  Monday, 1 April 1996.

(1)     From:   Michael Sharpston <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Sunday, 31 Mar 1996 15:41:42 +0000 (GMT)
        Subj:   Intuitive vs. "Scientific"

(2)     From:   Harry Hill <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Sunday, 31 Mar 1996 09:58:12 +0000 (HELP)
        Subj:   [Recording of *The Funeral Elegy* Available]

(3)     From:   Richard J Kennedy <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Sunday, 31 Mar 1996 10:42:43 -0800
        Subj:   Anonymous


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Sharpston <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 31 Mar 1996 15:41:42 +0000 (GMT)
Subject:        Intuitive vs. "Scientific"

I liked the recent comments by Stephanie Hughes on the difficulty of devising
quantitative measures that would convincingly determine authorship, especially
authorship by Shakespeare.  Her earlier piece, also,  of February 16, SHK
7.0127,  I found rather telling --  "...those who see, not the man, but the
clothes".

My own recent posting was a deliberately broad attempt to show where and why,
in April 1996, computer approaches were likely to prove valid or not.  Chess
must have seemed to many a rather human skill, or people would not have got so
agitated when Kasparov lost:  but certainly it isn't poetry.  I do not know if
there is a linguistic equivalent of "fingerprints", very hard to disguise.  The
posting by Jim Helfers, SHK 7.0238, on stylometry, seemed to me fascinating,
but I do not have the expertise to judge it. Presumably there is an empirical
question here, that perhaps some form of resampling could help determine.

Chess and fingerprints may seem quite far from blank verse (although in fact
Jim Helfers does also make passing reference to fingerprints); Cicero and his
clausulae in any case seem significantly less far from blank verse.  I do find
it of interest, perhaps relevance, that the belief tended to be that "esse
videatur" was the classic Cicero metric ending, when in fact statistically the
picture was more diverse.

If one suspends disbelief in the computer approach for just a moment, what
would people suggest as a re-write for the much-denigrated Shaxicon's
algorithms?  Does the stylometric posting offer any hope?  Recent studies of
violence on American TV have used quantitative methods, to me rather
meaningfully (and apparently politically potently), to document such violence
and even its likely impact on the viewer.  Perhaps Shakespeare is beyond all
that, but it might be worth giving a shot.

                                Michael Sharpston
                                
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 31 Mar 1996 09:58:12 +0000 (HELP)
Subject:        [Recording of *The Funeral Elegy* Available]

"Funeral Elegy for Master William Peter" by W.S.
Read by Harry Hill
Notes by Donald W.Foster and Richard Abrams


                                ORDER FORM


Compact Disc (with full edited text of the Elegy) or Audio Cassette recordings,

__ Number of AUDIO CASSETTES @ US$10.00 or CAN$14.00 each       Sub-total_______

__ Number of COMPACT DISCS @ US$14.00 or CAN$18.00 each         Sub-total_______


Canadian Residents please add CAN$3.75 shipping and handling
                                                                        _______
                           & 7% GST                    Subtotal         _______

U.S. Residents please add US $3.75 shipping and handling
                                                       Subtotal         _______

                                                               TOTAL___________

Name:         _________________________________________

Address:      _________________________________________

Apt.#:        ______________________

City:         ______________________

Prov./State:  ______________________

Postal/Zip    ____________________


PLEASE SEND CHEQUE OR MONEY ORDER TO:
Elegy-LOY HB 309
Concordia University
7141 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, Quebec Canada
H4B 1R6

Please make your cheque or money order to ELEGY, and allow three weeks for
delivery of tapes, five for CD.

Orders may also be sent to

                                
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard J Kennedy <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 31 Mar 1996 10:42:43 -0800
Subject:        Anonymous

My posts on the anonymous Doctor Dodypoll (1600) brought me some private mail,
twice wondering if I knew about "Thomas of Woodstock", another asking about
"Edmund Ironside".  Not knowing much, I checked out a book that included those
two plays:  "Six Early Plays related to the Shakespeare Canon", written by E.B.
Everitt and R.L. Armstrong.  Copenhagen, 1965.  The plays are these:

The True Chronicle History of King Leir (1605)
The Troublesome Reign of [King] John  (1591)
Edward III  (1596)
Thomas of Woodstock  (ms. 1593?)
Edmund Ironside  (ms. 1590?)
The Weakest Goeth to the Wall  (1600)

Everitt says of his selection:  "I believe thoughtful reading of these six
plays and the associated evidence will itself suggest a common authorship."
The first four have been standing in Shakespeare's foyer for some time, and
Edmund Ironside not so long, but I've never heard of "The Weakest" knocking at
the door.  It's this last play that particularly caught my attention, having
somewhat to do with Doctor Dodypoll.  First of all, you should know that there
is poetry in it.  Here are a few lines, Leonitius making his report of a
budding romance.

        "...the princess and young Ferdinand,
        Curbing their steeds in with their silken reins,
        Into a grove rode secretly together.
        Thrice did I see him kiss her snowy hand,
        And with three humble cursies bowed his head
        Down to the stirrup of Odillia.
        Then did I see him whispering in her ear,
        When with her fan she won the wanton wind
        To cool his face as they rode gently on.
        Then came they to a little purling brook,
        Whereas they paused, as it should seem, to hear
        The bird's sweet music to the bubbling stream.
        Then did I see him lift his eyes towards hers;
        ...whereas she plucked a bloomed lemon branch
        With her white hand, out of her coronet,
        And with her finger 'twined it in his lock
        And smiled, and bowed her head into his bosom.
        And thus with gentle parlance both together,
        They paced on unto the flow'ry lawn

That's as pretty a little tableau as Shakespeare ever wrote. Unfortunately,
being more history than romance, there's not nearly so much poetry as in
Dodypoll.  Nevertheless, the small portion left me wondering because "The
Weakest Goeth to the Wall" and "Doctor Dodypoll", both anon., were entered in
the Stationer's Register in the same month, October, 1600, and both plays were
printed by Thomas Creed, for Richard Olive, dwelling in Long Lane, 1600.
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.