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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: April ::
Re: Size; About This List; The Future
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0275. Thursday, 11 April 1996.

(1)     From:   Roger Taylor <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Apr 1996 09:26:27 -0600 (MDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0267 Re: Size

(2)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Apr 1996 16:41:29 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   About This List

(3)     From:   John Ramsay <
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        Date:   Thursday, 11 Apr 1996 00:52:17 -0400 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0260 Re: The Future


(1)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roger Taylor <
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Date:           Wednesday, 10 Apr 1996 09:26:27 -0600 (MDT)
Subject: 7.0267 Re: Size
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0267 Re: Size

>Subject:        Size of Elizabethans
>
>If it's truly important, couldn't we just dig up a few bones and measure them?

Not a very practical idea.  Few would not be enough; you could end up with both
a giant and a dwarf in your sample.  One would have to dig enough to represent
a statistical cross section of the population at that time.

The earlier comment (made by Michael Best, I think) made a good logical point
that I overlooked when I said it...about small clothes not being worn.  Touche.

Roger Taylor

(2)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Wednesday, 10 Apr 1996 16:41:29 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        About This List

Gabriel Egan quotes me:

>> If you don't like it, don't read it. If you like it a little bit, skim it.

And then adds:

>Maybe I'm being dim, but how do you know you don't like it until you've read
>it?

Okay, Gabriel, I left out a few words. Let's try this:  "If you don't like it
after reading a few paragraphs, chapters, etc., don't read the whole essay,
message, book, etc.  If you only like it a little bit after reading a few
paragraphs, chapters, etc., skim the rest of it."

On the other hand, maybe the essay or book gets really interesting AFTER the
first paragraphs or chapters.  So, maybe I should skim everything before I
decide not to read the essay, etc..

Alfred Harbage used to toss a book in his hand and say, "You have to get to
know if it's worth reading without reading it.  Otherwise, you'll spend all
your time reading." Unfortunately, he never told me how to perform that
miracle.

Yours,  Bill Godshalk

(3)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Ramsay <
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Date:           Thursday, 11 Apr 1996 00:52:17 -0400 (PDT)
Subject: 7.0260 Re: The Future
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0260 Re: The Future

Unknown Words : Shakespeare's Language in the high school classroom

- "pulpit" in JC (III-1)  :  Brutus : "I will myself into the pulpit first..."
I was astonished when a grade 10 student complained that this term was not in
the school edition glossary (The student was the son of a former member of my
English department, who left high school teaching for a position at the local
community college, so I could hardly blame the student's home environment for
an impoverished vocabulary)

 - As to sexual innuendo at the high/grammar school level : R & J (I-1) " draw
thy tool ... my naked weapon is out... cut off their heads... or their
maidenheads" - I had considerable difficulty convincing one Gr 11 class that
the sexual innuendo was intended by Shakespeare and not just in their own
prurient minds.

John Ramsay
Centennial S.S.,

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