1996

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0279.  Friday, 12 April 1996.

(1)     From:   David Wintersteen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Apr 1996 23:27:39 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Poss. Opening on ATHE Panel

(2)     From:   Annalisa Castaldo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 11 Apr 1996 11:24:44 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Mid-Atlantic Panel


(1)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Wintersteen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 10 Apr 1996 23:27:39 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Poss. Opening on ATHE Panel

Hello, SHAKSPERians,

I have put together a panel for ATHE with two others on cross-dressing in
contemporary performances of Shakespeare plays (beyond that called for in the
scripts).  One of the panel members may be in Montana, however, so we might be
in need of a replacement.  If you have interest and/or a paper in this area,
please e-mail me ASAP.

Thanks,
David Wintersteen
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

(2)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Annalisa Castaldo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 11 Apr 1996 11:24:44 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Mid-Atlantic Panel

                         Call for Papers

                 Shakespeare IN Popular Culture

                    Special Panel Topic for the
             Mid-Atlantic Popular Culture Conference
                       November 1-3, 1996
                          Philadelphia

In Highbrow/Lowbrow, Lawrence Levine laments the twentieth century view of
Shakespeare as purely a high cultural artifact.  But in truth, Shakespeare does
 have a very real and complicated presence in contemporary popular culture, as
evidenced by the  constant use of Shakespearean references throughout popular
fiction, music, film and television.

This panel welcomes papers that examine the presence of Shakespeare in  popular
culture, looking particularly at Shakespearean references and adaptations.
Hopefully,  this panel  will explore the significance of the relationship
between popular culture and the  Shakespearean canon.

                              *******

     Please send an abstract (150-500 words) to:

                    Elizabeth Abele
                    Temple University
                    1428 W. Norris St., #72
                    Philadelphia, PA  19121
                    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

                    Deadline:    May 20, 1996

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