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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: April ::
Re: Theory and Branagh
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0302.  Saturday, 21 April 1996.

(1)     From:   Peter Herman <
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        Date:   Friday, 19 Apr 1996 09:00:33 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0295 Qs: Theory, Branagh, and Cartoons

(2)     From:   Eileen Flanagan <
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        Date:   Friday, 19 Apr 1996 11:23:00 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0295 Qs: Theory, Branagh, and

(3)     From:   Chris Gordon <
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        Date:   Saturday, 20 Apr 96 13:58:57 -0500
        Subj:   Branagh's productions


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Herman <
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Date:           Friday, 19 Apr 1996 09:00:33 -0400
Subject: 7.0295 Qs: Theory, Branagh, and Cartoons
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0295 Qs: Theory, Branagh, and Cartoons

In response to David Shalkwyk's query, I have two responses. First, I cavil
with the term, "the advent of theory," which assumes a period that is *without*
theory. That, of course, is nonsense, and as Gerald Graff's marvelous book,
_Professing Literature_, shows in copious detail, the arguments surrounding
"theory" today have been a part of this profession since it's inception
sometime in the mid-nineteenth century. Second, my impression is that
Shakespeare criticism has suffered no diminution because of the introduction of
canon criticism, deconstruction, and the like. In fact, it seems to have only
increased production as new areas opened up (e.g., working on the ideology of
post-Renaissance constructions of Shakespeare, editing practices, manuscript
culture, and the like). To prove the point, one could look at the MLA
Bibliography every year to see how many items there are on Shakespeare, or--
and this might be a better option-- the annual bibliography in _Shakespeare
Quarterly_.  Along these lines, one of the criticisms of the New Historicism is
that despite its professed attention to marginalized voices, it has in effect
reproduced the canon rather than opening it up.

Peter C. Herman
Dept. of English
GSU

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Eileen Flanagan <
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Date:           Friday, 19 Apr 1996 11:23:00 -0500
Subject: 7.0295 Qs: Theory, Branagh, and
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0295 Qs: Theory, Branagh, and

I believe Mr. Branagh wrote quite a bit about HENRY V in his autobiography
BEGINNING.  It's toward the end of the book.  He also writes of his initial
experience with HENRY V at the RSC at little earlier in the book.  In fact the
book ends with the wrap of the HENRY V film.  The book should be available in
libraries and bookstores.

VTY, Eileen Flanagan

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Gordon <
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Date:           Saturday, 20 Apr 96 13:58:57 -0500
Subject:        Branagh's productions

Dear David Schalkwyk:

I have copies of Branagh's screenplays for both *Henry V* and *Much Ado*: he
has essays about the productions in each of them. He also wrote about the film
version of *Henry V* in his book *Beginning,* which I also have. I would be
happy to copy and send you this material if you're interested.

Chris Gordon
 

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