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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: April ::
Re: MND (Chastity); Texts; Visual Interpretation
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0304.  Saturday, 21 April 1996.

(1)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Friday, 19 Apr 1996 20:11:56 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0294  Re: MND (Alienation and Chastity)

(2)     From:   William Proctor Williams <
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        Date:   Saturday, 20 Apr 96 12:30 CDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0293  Re: Texts

(3)     From:   Christine Jacobson <
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        Date:   Saturday, 20 Apr 1996 17:11:38 -0700 (MST)
        Subj:   Visually Interpretive Skill vs. Textual Analysis Skills


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Friday, 19 Apr 1996 20:11:56 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 7.0294  Re: MND (Alienation and Chastity)
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0294  Re: MND (Alienation and Chastity)

Regarding "enforced chastity,"  David Bevington in his edition comments:
"forced, violated; or. possibly, constrained (since Titania at this moment in
hardly concerned about chastity)."  Accept for the qualification "possibly,"
Bevington's gloss seems right on target to me. But, then, I think Don Hedrick's
interpretation is right on target too.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Proctor Williams <
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Date:           Saturday, 20 Apr 96 12:30 CDT
Subject: 7.0293  Re: Texts
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0293  Re: Texts

In response to Milla's postings about texts, and I hate to suggest that John
Andrews', or any one's should be put out of the loop, there is the choice of
going to the STC microfilm, or to the various facsimilies, and generating a
text by photocopy which is the "original."  I think anyone who can act
Shakespeare could be quickly taught the long s i-j u-v w conventions.  Then
they go from there.  What they find defective in the text may be of real
interest to scholars.

I have been troubled for years with acting companies using the "filter" of
Arden, Bevington, Evans, etc. as a way to get at the text on stage.  I think
Alan Dessen would agree with this proposal.

This may, initially, be a bit more clumsy than using a "prepared" text, but I
think it will, could, work.  What do you on the list, who work with the stage
regularly, think?

William Proctor Williams
Department of English
Northern Illinois University

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Jacobson <
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Date:           Saturday, 20 Apr 1996 17:11:38 -0700 (MST)
Subject:        Visually Interpretive Skill vs. Textual Analysis Skills

This message is in response to Jamison Porter's posting of April 3/96 in which
he decries the difficulty in presenting Shakespearean texts for interpretation
to a class of today's more visually literate student bodies. I recently
attempted to produce a term paper for my course 312b Shakespeare first, reading
four Shakespeare plays and then attempting to judge their translations into
film.  In so doing, I realized that there are a couple of difficulties, one, in
particular, of analysising verbal images, symbol in spite of copius quantities
of various visual stimulations and distractions. If nothing else, it made me
realize the importance of film analysis, period, into verbal written
expression, especially in light of today's prevelant visual productions - T.V.,
movie industry, music videos, etc.  One step towards taming this sensual influx
and retaining verbal and analytical skills would be to provide Film
journalistic format courses on works of such bards as Shakespeare.  I guess
you'd have to begin in high school.

Christine Jacobson

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