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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: April ::
New on the SHAKSPER Fileserver: REFORMAT HAMLET
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0311.  Tuesday, 23 April 1996.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <
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Date:           Tuesday, April 23, 1996
Subject:        New on the SHAKSPER Fileserver: REFORMAT HAMLET

As of today, SHAKSPEReans may retrieve my seminar paper for the Sixth World
Shakespeare Congress "Reformatting Hamlet: Creating a Q1 Hamlet for Television"
(REFORMAT HAMLET) from the SHAKSPER Fileserver.

To retrieve "Reformatting Hamlet: Creating a Q1 Hamlet for Television", send a
one-line mail message (without a subject line) to 
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reading "GET REFORMAT HAMLET".

Should you have difficulty receiving this or any of the files on the SHAKSPER
Fileserver, please contact the editor at <
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<
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Reformatting Hamlet: Creating a Q1 Hamlet for Television

                        Hardy M. Cook

For "Reformatting the Bard" Seminar, Sixth World Shakespeare Congress

        I have argued that television is a medium that has unique qualities
that make it suitable to particular televisual and theatrical styles.
Additionally, I have stressed the flexibility that television provides to us to
analyze these productions in depth.  However, I had not until this past summer
considered using video technology physically to re-edit an existing "full-text"
version of a play into a shorter Q1 (so-called "bad" quarto) version.  Since
the publication of The Division of the Kingdoms, many have investigated the
"bad" quartos.  A quality common in many of these seemingly disparate
approaches to the transmission of these printed scripts is that they might
provide us insights into actual performances.  Operating under the premise that
the first printed edition of Hamlet may indeed supply such theatrical insights,
I re-edited The BBC TV Shakespeare Hamlet from its little more than
three-and-a-half-hour-long, roughly full-text version into an approximately
three-hour version, following the scene structure of Q1.  Having completed my
reconstruction, I now propose to describe my method and to explore some of the
insights I have gained from this exercise.
 

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