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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: April ::
Calls for Papers; ACTER
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0322.  Tuesday, 30 April 1996.

(1)     From:   Luke A. Wilson <
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        Date:   Friday, 26 Apr 1996 14:03:22 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   CALL FOR PAPERS

(2)     From:   Megan Lloyd <
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        Date:   Friday, 26 Apr 1996 16:33:27 +500
        Subj:   Shakespeare at Kalamazoo, Call for Papers 1997

(3)     From:   Cynthia Dessen <
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        Date:   Friday, 26 Apr 1996 06:32:42 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   ACTER openings 1996-97


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Luke A. Wilson <
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Date:           Friday, 26 Apr 1996 14:03:22 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        CALL FOR PAPERS

                             CALL FOR PAPERS

                  TEXTUAL PRACTICE AND THEATRICAL LABOR:
                    SHAKESPEARE AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES
                     1997 Ohio Shakespeare Conference
                           Department of English
                           Ohio State University
                                Columbus OH
                              May 16-18, 1997

                            Featured Speakers:
                    Stephen Orgel (Stanford University)
                 Leah Marcus (University of Texas, Austin)
                     Jeff Masten (Harvard University)
            Douglas Bruster (University of Texas, San Antonio)

The 1997 Ohio Shakespeare Conference invites paper and session proposals on any
aspect of the business of the theater in Shakespeare's lifetime, from
reexaminations of textual and editing problems, to the material and economic
conditions within which dramatic scripts, texts and performances were produced
and consumed in the many transactions that occured among the interested
parties: consumer, player, patron, printing house, playhouse, playwright.

The conference seeks new research on, and new conceptualizations of, some of
the oldest critical and historical questions concerning early modern theater:
What economic, ideological, and phenomenological structures shaped and were
shaped by the performance of dramatic and theatrical work? How do such
structures affect textual and theatrical production and reproduction?  What
bearing do such concerns have on questions of topicality, influence,
didacticism, patronage, or the evolution of dramatic tastes and genres?

While Shakespeare will undoubtedly figure prominently, the conference aims at
somewhat broader coverage.  Work on Shakespeare's contemporaries in the
theater, therefore, as well on Shakespeare's collaborative work, is encouraged.
 Suitable panel and paper topics include, but are not limited to:

** acting as labor * "playhouse interpolations" and the production of meaning *
textual variants and the economics of revision * sites and scenes of dramatic
composition * collaborative authorship * acting as action * text v. work * work
v. labor * work and play * script as work product * the cultural work of the
theater * performance as artifact * employment contracts * entrepreneurship *
contractual and theatrical performances * promises * wagers * joint stock
companies and corporate personality * professional competence and incompetence
* expertise and training * divisions of labor in theatrical practice, and in
dramatic representation * material phenomenologies of the theater * represented
time and the time it takes to represent it * acting, identity and alienation *
consumption (e.g., playgoing) as work * dramatic representations of economic
relationships * pirates and "dramatic piracy" * acting and ownership *
censorship and economics * economics and/of influence **

For more information, or to submit abstracts for 20-minute presentations, or
proposals for sessions (deadline: December 20, 1996), contact:

Luke Wilson or Chris Highley
Department of English
Ohio State University
164 W. 17th Ave
Columbus OH 43210-1370
voice: 614-292-6065
fax: 614-292-7816
email: 
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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Megan Lloyd <
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Date:           Friday, 26 Apr 1996 16:33:27 +500
Subject:        Shakespeare at Kalamazoo, Call for Papers 1997

                       SHAKESPEARE AT KALAMAZOO
            Thirty-second International Congress on Medieval Studies
                         Kalamazoo, Michigan

PROPOSED sessions for the Thirty-second Congress in 1997 are subject to
approval by The Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University. SHAKESPEARE AT
KALAMAZOO has organized programs  at the International Congress since 1989.

             Session 1.  Domesticity and the Unruly Woman:
                 Marriage and Gender Issues in Shakespeare
This panel session invites scholars from a variety of disciplines to discuss
gender issues in the late medieval and early modern periods.  Panelists will
focus their discussion on how the diverse voices of Shakespeare's women,
particularly the disruptive or otherwise "unruly" women, reflect, undermine, or
transcend gender, class, and societal expectations and convey a feminist
ideology that developed over the late medieval and early modern periods.
Topics for this panel may include the family circle, domestic relations, class
structure, marriage, kinships, domestic settings, and service.  To enable
greater participation in this session, panel presentations should be no longer
than 10 minutes.

               Session 2.  Mapping Shakespeare
This session provides an interdisciplinary forum in which to explore aspects of
social and political geography as well as various geographical places
Shakespeare mentions in his works. Papers might discuss travel, maps,
cityscapes, locales, the pastoral, the social landscape, among other topics
that address a Renaissance sense of place emerging from the Medieval world
view. This session invites scholars in all disciplines including art, history,
music, folklore, and philosophy as well as literature.

The Congress on Medieval Studies provides a unique milieu for an exchange of
insights on Shakespeare's place in the continuum of culture.  The following
rules corresponding to those established by the Board of the Medieval Institute
should be strictly adhered to if you intend to submit an abstract:

   1.  All Abstracts must include the following information at the top of the
front page: title of paper; name of author; complete mailing address, including
e-mail and fax if available; institutional affiliation, if any, of the author;
confirmation of the 10- minute or 20-minute reading time length; statement of
need (or no need) for audio-visual equipment.

   2.  Abstracts or papers must be typed, double-spaced, not more than 300
words long, and must clearly indicate the papers's thesis, methodology, and
conclusions.  Accepted abstracts will be submitted for publication to the
Shakespeare Newsletter or other periodical.  Publication of abstracts does not
preclude publication of complete papers.

   3.  THREE HARD COPIES OF ABSTRACTS or, PREFERABLY, COMPLETED PAPERS MUST BE
SUBMITTED BY SEPTEMBER 1.  Abstracts or papers submitted after the deadline
cannot be considered. Three members of the governing board of SHAKESPEARE AT
KALAMAZOO will select the papers.  E-mail submission is encouraged to
facilitate transmission among the selection panel.

  4.  Submission of an abstract or papers will be considered agreement by the
author to attend the Congress if the paper is accepted.

  5.  It is understood that papers submitted will be essentially new and have
not been presented in public before.

   6.  Graduate students who wish to submit an abstract should consult their
advisors about the suitability of their work and the regulations (if any) of
their university.

   7.  Papers submitted may not require more than 10 MINUTES OF READING TIME
for Session 1 or 20 MINUTES OF READING TIME for Session 2, including slides,
films, or other audio-video support. Session leaders will hold papers strictly
to this limit to facilitate discussion.

   8.  In order to allow as many scholars to participate in the program as
possible, ONE ABSTRACT ONLY should be submitted to the Thirty-second Congress.

Send inquiries, abstracts, and papers to Megan Lloyd, Department of English,
University of Rio Grande, Rio Grande, Ohio 45674.  Phone: (614) 245-7419 / Fax:
614-245-7432 / E-mail: 
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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cynthia Dessen <
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Date:           Friday, 26 Apr 1996 06:32:42 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        ACTER openings 1996-97

ACTER has an opening Oct. 7-13, 1996 for a residency of *Much Ado About
Nothing*. I am particularly interested in any schools in the area of Arkansas
to Texas and could make a discount for this week. ACTER also has openings Feb.
17-23 and March 3-9, 1997 for *Romeo and Juliet* - please contact us if you are
interested. Cynthia Dessen, Gen. Manager, 
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