1996

Important Message from SHAKSPER's Editor

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0404.  Friday, 31 May 1996.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, May 31, 1996
Subject:        Important Message from SHAKSPER's Editor

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

Yesterday, while trying to fix the remaining problem from the recent
LISTSERV crash, I inadvertently trashed the SHAKSPER membership list.
After hours of e-mail exchanges with the author of LISTSERV, I had no
choice but to reconstruct completely that membership list -- meaning I
had to add manually all 1241 of you back.  I did lose two or three
members whose accounts were set to CONCEAL, but I'm trying to get them
back.

The biggest problem with what happened is that now everyone's account
is set to the MAIL option.  As a result, some of you will be hearing
from SHAKSPER today for the first time in some time.  I apologize for
intruding if you had wanted to remain on the NOMAIL option, but I have
no other choice with the nature of the problem I just had.

I will have to ask everyone's indulgence while I try to put things
right.  Let me review the options members have and ask that you make
any changes that are appropriate.


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I assume that it will take me a few days to clean up this mess, so you
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Qs: Background Text; Workshops

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0403.  Thursday, 30 May 1996.

(1)     From:   Jan Stirm <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 May 1996 11:12:56 PST
        Subj:   Texts Q.

(2)     From:   Ramona McKean <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 May 1996 18:58:39 PST
        Subj:   Workshops


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jan Stirm <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 May 1996 11:12:56 PST
Subject:        Texts Q.

Dear SHAKSPERians,

I'm in the process of wwoking out which texts to order for my (more or less)
later Shakespeare class next fall.  I'm planning a social/political history
focus, and am thinking of using Keith Wrightson's English Society for
background.  I was wondering if you might have other suggestions, or if you've
used Wrightson's book, you had suggestions for making it work well for
students.

Many thanks, Jan Stirm
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ramona McKean <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 May 1996 18:58:39 PST
Subject:        Workshops

[This query came from person not yet a member of SHAKSPER.  Please reply
directly to her if you can help.  --HMC]

Dear Dr. Cook,

I am a high school English teacher in Nanaimo, B.C., Canada who'll be
travelling in England this summer, July 5- August 15.  I would very much like
to find a short workshop (1-5 days) on Shakespeare to take for professional
development purposes. Could you possibly provide me with workshop titles,
dates, locations, costs, etc. by June 10th?

Re: Texts; Woodstock; Sign Seen in Window

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0401.  Thursday, 30 May 1996.

(1)     From:   Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 30 May 1996 00:28:43 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0398 Re: Texts

(2)     From:   Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 May 1996 16:55:31 -0500
        Subj:   Before Richard II

(3)     From:   Martin Jukovsky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 May 1996 21:08:58 GMT
        Subj:   Sign Seen in Window


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 30 May 1996 00:28:43 +0100
Subject: 7.0398 Re: Texts
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0398 Re: Texts

John Drakakis writes

> Let me take the last point first about Derrida and "originals": on
> the principle that no "original" can ever be present to itself, then
> any invocation of the term is bound to raise the question of
> whether an "original" is ever possible.

Whoosh! That one went higher over my head than the last. I haven't the foggiest
idea what you mean.

Is it useful to comment that "original" is one of those fascinating words that
means its own opposite? Like "cleave" or "period". Am I on the right track?

> To use the term is to
> invoke the law, and to disclose the conditions of its
> operation...hence  politics.

Nope, I'm still lost.

>  Of course, you may say that all language
> is prone to this failing, and that the anchoring points
> which sustain meaning are provisional.

I get the second part of this sentence, and can relate it to post-Saussurean
linguistics. But...

>  Ergo, "original" can never quite deliver as a term the
>promise that it holds out.   I'm sure that irony wasn't lost on the general
>editors of the series.

I'm only as far as understanding that "original" is one of those interesting
cases where we can chart the change in meaning as part of a cultural shift
(as Williams does in _Keywords_).

>My only reservation is that we should
>be careful here not to make "performance" the "source", so to speak, in a way
>which is essentially no different from making print the "source".

My accommodation to the potentially conservative notion of "intention", on the
grounds that Marxists should be concerned with the dramatist's creative labour,
leads me to draw a great distinction between these two possible "sources".
Shakespeare undoubtedly intended performances, but not printed play-texts.

The rest of your post concerns editing, and we don't disagree on the principle
of the Shakespearean Originals series (ie to do diplomatic reprints), only on
the quality of the execution and the silly claims made for it ("throwing
cordons" around text, etc).

Gabriel Egan

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 May 1996 16:55:31 -0500
Subject:        Before Richard II

For more data see A. P. Rossiter's edition of the anonymous play *Woodstock*.

Frank Whigham

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Jukovsky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 May 1996 21:08:58 GMT
Subject:        Sign Seen in Window

>From: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
>Date: Wed, 29 May 1996 16:20:20 EST
>Subject: sign seen in window
>
>Seen in the window of a UK sporting goods store:
>
>"This is the discount of our winter tent"
>

Martin Jukovsky
Cambridge, Mass.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

SSE October 9-14 Availability

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0402.  Thursday, 30 May 1996.

From:           Margo McGirr <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wed, 29 May 1996 18:14:22 -0400
Subject:        SSE October 9-14 Availability

The Shenandoah Shakespeare Express has an opening in the '96 tour schedule
between October 9-14.  The four plays in our '96 repertory are Henry V, As You
Like It, Julius Caesar and Comedy of Errors.  A single performance costs just
$1850 + travel, food and lodging for the twelve member company. (On campus
facilities are acceptable.)  We will be in the Vermont area making our way
toward Cape Cod.  Any organization interested in booking the SSE or finding out
more about the company may contact Margo McGirr, former Cleopatra, current
Booking Coordinator (Do you suppose that's a demotion?) at (540) 434-3366 or at
this address. Thanks- Margo

Re: Rape and Comedy

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0400.  Thursday, 30 May 1996.

(1)     From:   Ed Pixley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 May 1996 16:18:28 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0396 Q: Rape and Comedy

(2)     From:   Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 May 1996 16:23:11 +0000 (HELP)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0396  Q: Rape and Comedy


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Pixley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 May 1996 16:18:28 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 7.0396 Q: Rape and Comedy
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0396 Q: Rape and Comedy

Jimmy -- Can we take the _Volpone_ rape scene seriously?  You bet we can? You
may have had trouble because of a casting choice or an actor's choice. I do
have trouble imagining a fat Volpone, but I didn't see it.  However, had you
seen Douglas Campbell do the scene at the Guthrie Theatre in 1963 or 64, you
would have had no doubt of Volpone's intention -- or ability -- of following
through.  If you read the scene aloud, you will find, I believe, that its
rhythms suggest a dance of seduction, intended to mesmerize Celia.  Set it to
music to discover how it might work as a dance. But Volpone never knows how to
quit when he's ahead, and his eloquent images and rhythms also seduce him,
leading him to excesses which finally alienate Celia further rather than
drawing her in.

Ed Pixley

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 May 1996 16:23:11 +0000 (HELP)
Subject: 7.0396  Q: Rape and Comedy
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0396  Q: Rape and Comedy

SHORT FAT VOLPONE?

Who said he is brief of stature? His vowels are large and long.

Why can he not be fat and powerfully priapic?

It might be noted that when my twenty year-old pudgy body played the part at
the Edinburgh Festival Fringe the Ceclia ran away three days before opening
night, overpowered by the manly music of the seduction scene; she was found two
days later at an aunt's house, filling up on scones and cakes to comfort her
fears, and brought back to the theatre agreeing to continue the role if I kept
my hand inside her belt to keep her form running away again. We all put it down
to the strength of the verse.

        Harry Hill
        Montreal

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