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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: May ::
Re: Othello's Love
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0347.  Wednesday, 8 May 1996.

(1)     From:   Chris Stroffolino <
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        Date:   Monday, 06 May 1996 12:32:51 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0342  Re: Othello's Love

(2)     From:   Stephanie Hughes <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 7 May 1996 08:05:18 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0337  Re: Othello's Love

(3)     From:   Terence Martin <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 07 May 96 10:19:52 CDT
        Subj:   Othello's Rationalizing

(4)     From:   Kezia Vanmeter Sproat <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 8 May 1996 08:58:05 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0332 Re: Othello's Love


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Stroffolino <
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Date:           Monday, 06 May 1996 12:32:51 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 7.0342  Re: Othello's Love
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0342  Re: Othello's Love

Dear Pat Dunlay--I'm very interested in your comparison of Othello's
"valediction" speech to Macbeth's "tomorrow and tomorrow..." speech. Isn't it
possible that the reason the Macbeth speech doesn't make you as angry is
because the speech is about indifference---the indifference to his wife that
pretty much began from the second he became king, or maybe signs of it are
evident when she faints (which I take as genuine rather than feigned)? And such
indifference, alienation or coldness may be as responsible for his wife's death
as Othello's blatant physical actions are. Curious what you think, and maybe
you expand on why you think it's a "better play". Chris Stroffolino

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephanie Hughes <
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Date:           Tuesday, 7 May 1996 08:05:18 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 7.0337  Re: Othello's Love
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0337  Re: Othello's Love

When Othello tells us that he was one who loved not wisely but too well, I
believe that we are hearing the author tell us about himself, as he does in so
many sililoquies, telling us things about himself that are confirmed, as is
this statement, by what he shows us of himself in the sonnets, and that all his
heroes, Othello, Hamlet, Lear, Romeo, Hal, Antonio, Benedick, even Macbeth and
Richard III, are thinly disguised portraits of himself.

Stephanie Hughes

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Martin <
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Date:           Tuesday, 07 May 96 10:19:52 CDT
Subject:        Othello's Rationalizing

I agree with much that has been said about Othello meaning Desdemona rather
than Iago.  Certainly, it represents some rationalizing, but what about the
commonplace warning of contemporary preachers to men not to love their wives
too much lest they be led into sin, etc.?

Terence Martin
UM-St.Louis

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kezia Vanmeter Sproat <
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Date:           Wednesday, 8 May 1996 08:58:05 -0400
Subject: 7.0332 Re: Othello's Love
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0332 Re: Othello's Love

Stephanie Hughes sees homosexuality as the only way to explain the hold Iago
has on Othello. I see another, deeper hold that grips both characters, anchored
in the bedrock of Venetian thought, and illustrated from the first scene to the
last, to wit, misogynism. Comparison of the known source and Shakespeare's
changes suggest(ed) to me (21 years ago, in my diss.) that he was very
conscious of pointing up the misogynism of Venice as a force in the entire
action. For me, this play is one of the greatest feminist works of art in
western literature.
 

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