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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: May ::
Qs: Malvolio and Hercules; Water Damage;
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0354.  Wednesday, 8 May 1996.

(1)     From:   Marcello Cappuzzo <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 7 May 1996 15:32:14 +0200
        Subj:   Malvolio and Hercules. A query

(2)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 07 May 1996 21:47:18 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Water Damaged Norton Folio

(3)     From:   Dom Saliani <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 08 May 1996 09:33:34 -0700 (MST)
        Subj:   Miss-Lineation


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marcello Cappuzzo <
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Date:           Tuesday, 7 May 1996 15:32:14 +0200
Subject:        Malvolio and Hercules. A query

I wish to submit a query on behalf of a colleague who is not (yet) a member of
this List.  He has noticed that there are curious paralles between _Twelfth
Night_ II.v.153 (Arden) -- "Remember who commended thy yellow stockings, and
wished to see thee ever cross-gartered" -- and Seneca's _Phaedra_  320-321
"crura distincto religavit auro / luteo plantas cohibente socco".  Apart from
the strange 'coincidence' of the yellow stockings and the crossed-over garters,
the whole situation -- he says -- seems to suggest an analogy between Hercules
and Malvolio, between the former's passion for the Lydian queen Omphale and the
latter's love for Countess Olivia.  In both cases love is an uncontrollable
force, it's a powerful agent whose victims are driven to wild and foolish
actions.  Does anyone know of any editors or critics who point out this analogy
or mention Seneca in connection with "The Fortunate-Unhappy"'s letter?  Please
feel free to respond directly to me if you prefer -- and thank you in advance.

Marcello Cappuzzo
University of Palermo

P.S.  It would be interesting to know how John Studley rendered Seneca's lines
quoted above in his 1581 translation of the play (in Th. Newton's _Tenne
Tragedies_, which unfortunately is not available either to my Roman friend or
to me).

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Tuesday, 07 May 1996 21:47:18 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Water Damaged Norton Folio

I realize that this request is only tangentially Shakespearean, but my office
copy of the Norton Folio was soaked with water over the weekend -- the result
of a student prank. I, of course, have read that freeze-drying a water damaged
book is the appropriate technique, and my copy of the Folio is now in my
freezer.  But what do I do now?  Just wait?

Is anyone on this list familiar with freeze-drying books or know someone who
is?

Yours,  Bill Godshalk

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dom Saliani <
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Date:           Wednesday, 08 May 1996 09:33:34 -0700 (MST)
Subject:        Miss-Lineation

Dear SHAKSPERians:

I need help. In examining *Macbeth* I have noticed that most modern editions of
the play differ greatly from the Folio edition in terms of lineation. It seems
that what these modern editors have done is re- lineated so that the speeches
conform more closely to the iambic pentameter expectation.

Take for example:

               FIRST FOLIO -

BANQUO: Hold, take my Sword;
     There's Husbandry in Heaven,
     Their candles are all out : take thee that too.
     A heavy Summons lyes like Lead upon me,
     And yet I would not sleepe;
     Merciful Powers, restraine in me the cursed thoughts
     That Nature gives way to in repose.

          *Enter Macbeth, and a Servant with a Torch.

     Give me my Sword : who's there?

               MODERN EDITION (New Folger) -

BANQUO:  Hold, take my Sword.
                         There's husbandry in heaven,
     Their candles are all out. Take thee that too.
     A heavy Summons lyes like Lead upon me,
     And yet I would not sleepe. Merciful powers,
     restraine in me the cursed thoughts that nature
     Gives way to in repose.

          *Enter Macbeth, and a Servant with a torch.*

                         Give me my Sword -- Who's there?

I think the Folger is conventional in its treatment of the plays in that they
do not hesitate to relineate to approach the iambic pentameter and they space
subsequent lines to create the appearance that they go together to complete the
iambic pentameter mold. What I mean by this last point can be shown in the
following from *Hamlet*:

HORATIO: Nay, very pale.
HAMLET:             And fix'd his eyes upon you?
HORATIO: Most constantly.
HAMLET:              I would I had been there.
HORATIO: It would have much amaz'd you.
HAMLET:                             Very like.
          Stayed it long?

Such spacing does not occur in any of the quartos or Folios.

My query:  When did this practice of relineation begin?
           What was the rationale?
           How is this practice regarded by the professional community?

And most importantly: Is it necessary? I find, especially in *Macbeth* that the
First Folio reads far better in the original lineation than in the relineated
modern editions. As a matter of fact, the Folio reading is clearer and reads as
being more modern than the relineated texts that create more archaic
enjambments for the sake of an artificially produced iambic pentameter effect.

I read somewhere (I think the Arden edition) that *Macbeth* is the "worst
mislineated text of all. This would mean that it is the most relineated.

Please help. If you know of any sources that I can refer to that discuss this
matter, I would be most appreciative. I am also most interested in your
opinions on the matter.

Dom Saliani
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