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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: May ::
Re: Hercules; L. Macbeth; Othello's Love; ADO
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0366.  Monday, 13 May 1996.

(1)     From:   Chris Stroffolino <
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        Date:   Saturday, 11 May 1996 12:41:50 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0360  Re: Malvolio and Hercules

(2)     From:   Chris Stroffolino <
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        Date:   Saturday, 11 May 1996 13:50:18 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0356  Re: Othello and Macbeth

(3)     From:   Fumiyuki Narushima <
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        Date:   Monday, 13 May 96 15:47:32 +0900
        Subj:   SHK 7.0330  Othello's Love

(4)     From:   Jeff Myers <
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        Date:   Saturday, 11 May 1996 15:15:14 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0355 Re: MUCH ADO Explication


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Stroffolino <
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Date:           Saturday, 11 May 1996 12:41:50 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 7.0360  Re: Malvolio and Hercules
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0360  Re: Malvolio and Hercules

There was a book (i think from the 50's) called something like "THE HERCULEAN
HERO IN SHAKESPEARE". Does anybody know who wrote it? For some reason, Eugene
Waith seems to come to mind, but I don't think that's right.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Stroffolino <
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Date:           Saturday, 11 May 1996 13:50:18 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 7.0356  Re: Othello and Macbeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0356  Re: Othello and Macbeth

Pat Dunlay--If you agree that Lady Macbeth's faint is genuine rather than
feigned (in terms of character "psychology" and plausibility rather than on the
level Terence Hawkes speaks of), I am curious why you think so? Especially if
you deny the increasing estrangement of her from her husband in the second half
of the play. Though I will not argue that Macbeth does not lean on her in the
banquet scene, in so many other ways the increasing estrangement is suggested.
Earlier in the play they had been "partners" but as he becomes king, he begins
to act without consulting her (I believe the admission that he killed the
servants he allegedly killed Duncan is the first instance of this and may
explain her faint.....[typo above I mean "who killed D.."] and this continues.
Also her "thane of fife he had a wife song". The estrangement between them
escalates. One may be moved by his vision of life as a brief candle and claim
that there is despair there, but the despair does not seem to be for Lady
Macbeth. "She should have died hereafter" strikes me as if he's almost BLAMING
her, and whether it's more noble than "I will kill thee and love thee after"
seems highly questionable. The "tomorrow" Macbeth so banked on never comes, CAN
never come, just like Othello's.

     Chris S.

P.S. Or, if I understand Mr. Hawkes argument correctly, not only is the
feigning feigned but all the deaths are feigned too. Thus the "death" becomes a
trope or a play-death and our attention should be directed less to the plot
than to the language which exceeds it and the deaths in the tragedies become
symbols for something else (Montaigne would say "sleep"; others would say
"sex"). But this is another discussion.

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fumiyuki Narushima <
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Date:           Monday, 13 May 96 15:47:32 +0900
Subject: Othello's Love
Comment:        SHK 7.0330  Othello's Love

Recently, I read William Van Watson's "Shakespeare, Zeffirelli, and the
Homosexuall Gaze" in Deborah E. Barker and Ivo Kamps, eds., *Shakespeare and
Gender* (London 1995).  Watson deals with Zeffirelli's film of *Othello* in
which Iago's homosexual relation with Cassio is visually accentuated.

Fumiyuki Narushima, Kitami Institute of Technology

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jeff Myers <
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Date:           Saturday, 11 May 1996 15:15:14 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 7.0355 Re: MUCH ADO Explication
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0355 Re: MUCH ADO Explication

> On Tuesday April 8th, P. Groves wrote, in response to F. Amit's Hebrewization
> of _Much Ado_ , that "surely April 1st was weeks ago?"

Does anyone else, as Keith Richards implies, associate the above response with
assault?  I thought Peter Groves was just being playful.  A real assault is
something like Gore Vidal's evisceration of John Updike in the TLS.  Let's not
be too sensitive, lest we take all the enjoyment from life.  "For what do we
live, but to make sport for our neighbors and laugh at them in our turn?"

Jeff Myers
 

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