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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: May ::
Re: Texts
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0371.  Tuesday, 14 May 1996.

(1)     From:   John Drakakis <
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        Date:   Monday, 13 May 1996 18:42:00 +0100
        Subj:   RE: SHK 7.0367 Re: Texts

(2)     From:   John Mahon <JWM1@IONA.bitnet>
        Date:   Monday, 13 May 96 14:27:44 EDT
        Subj:   SHK 7.0291 Re: Texts

(3)     From:   Kevin J. Donovan <
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        Date:   Monday, 13 May 1996 14:33:17 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: Biblioholism

(4)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Monday, 13 May 1996 22:51:46 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0367  Re: Texts


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Drakakis <
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Date:           Monday, 13 May 1996 18:42:00 +0100
Subject: 7.0367 Re: Texts
Comment:        RE: SHK 7.0367 Re: Texts

I must apologise for putting Bill Godshalk's phrase in Gabriel Egan's mouth.

On the question of the definition of terms, Egan seems to thing that meaning is
what he thinks it is.  He wants to be "historical" when it suits his argument
and utterly unbound by any historical context when it doesn't.

Since when is the process of eidtorial accretion a "simple" process? And in any
case when we get to an "original" text do we not then encounter the discursive
fields within which it is historically situated?  A cursory sideways glance at
the political version of Deconstruction will, I am sure, reveal the provisional
finitude of the epithet "original". One could argue that "Beginings" might have
been a better term.

I can well understand Egan's reluctance to trace the terms he uses back to Marx
and Freud.  However if he persists in using terms which have a recognizable
history then he may well have to if he want to contest their meanings.
Otherwise all we do is play the game of right you are if you think so, which I
believe is a peculiarly transatlantic form of political practice which on the
one hand seeks to assert vehemently that language is a social and historical
phenomenon but which then insists upon separating the individual who is
inscribed in its structures and who uses it from any recognizable social
formation.

You stick to your  overdetermined democtratic practice and I'll stick to mine.

Hi jacet Drakakis

Cheers
John Drakakis

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Mahon <JWM1@IONA.bitnet>
Date:           Monday, 13 May 96 14:27:44 EDT
Subject: Re: Texts
Comment:        SHK 7.0291 Re: Texts

Monday, 13 May 1996

Several weeks ago, Michael Kischner inquired about the "debate" he assumed must
have been stirred up by the texts of the Everyman Shakespeare, edited by John
Andrews.  Subsequent contributions have discussed his specific question on the
text of HAMLET, and Prof. Godshalk made a brief allusion to John Andrews as an
editor.

In its SUMMER 1993 issue (XLIII:2), THE SHAKESPEARE NEWSLETTER provided a
thorough analysis of the Everyman Shakespeare, with special attention to its
textual innovations, which we found far too innovative for a text presumably
intended for use in classrooms.  The FALL 1993 issue (XLIII:3) included an
article by John Andrews on "The Rationale of the Everyman Shakespeare." THE
SHAKESPEARE NEWSLETTER attempts to keep Shakespeareans informed about new
editions.  In SUMMER 1992 (XLII:2) we reviewed the first volumes of the New
Folger Library Shakespeare, and in FALL 1995 (XLV:3) we featured an extensive
analysis of the early volumes in the third series of the Arden Shakespeare.
Future issues will carry commentary on future Arden volumes, and we also hope
to discuss the new Applause Shakespeare for our readers in a future issue.

THE SHAKESPEARE NEWSLETTER is available in many academic libraries or directly
from the English Department at Iona College, 715 North Avenue, New Rochelle, NY
10801. Tel: (914) 633-2061. Fax: (914) 637-2722. E-Mail: shnl@iona.bitnet

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kevin J. Donovan <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 13 May 1996 14:33:17 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Re: Biblioholism

> John Drakakis writes:
>
> >For Wendy Thomas,
> >
> >Thanks for the reference but I think it was Gabriel Egan not me who used the
> >term "biblioholism".
>
> Actually it was me who talked about early seventeenth century biblioholism!
>
> Yours, Bill Godshalk

Malvolio, Malvolio, thy wits the heavens restore!  Endeavor thyself to sleep
and leave thy vain bibble babble.

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 13 May 1996 22:51:46 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 7.0367  Re: Texts
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0367  Re: Texts

I wrote:

>Actually it was me who talked about early seventeenth century biblioholism!

Oh, dear! I suppose it was I who talked about early seventeenth century
biblioholism, and not "me" at all!

Yours, Bill Godshalk
 

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