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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: May ::
Re: *Much Ado* Illustrations
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0372.  Tuesday, 14 May 1996.

(1)     From:   Rick Jones <
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        Date:   Monday, 13 May 1996 13:44:32 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0368 Q: *Much Ado* Illustrations

(2)     From:   Harry Rusche <
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        Date:   Monday, 13 May 1996 15:38:42 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0368 Q: *Much Ado* Illustrations

(3)     From:   Keith Richards <
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        Date:   Monday, 13 May 1996 16:51:39 -0700
        Subj:   Much Ado illustration

(4)     From:   Nick Clary <
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        Date:   Monday, 13 May 1996 15:56:25 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   *Much Ado* Illustrations


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rick Jones <
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Date:           Monday, 13 May 1996 13:44:32 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 7.0368 Q: *Much Ado* Illustrations
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0368 Q: *Much Ado* Illustrations

Cynthia Dessen asks for"interesting illustrations of Much Ado About Nothing."

You might check out Rowse's Annotated Shakespeare.  It contains several
engravings, line drawings, and production photographs that might be of
interest.

Rick Jones

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Rusche <
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Date:           Monday, 13 May 1996 15:38:42 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 7.0368 Q: *Much Ado* Illustrations
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0368 Q: *Much Ado* Illustrations

Try Richard Altick's _Paintings from Books_.

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Keith Richards <
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Date:           Monday, 13 May 1996 16:51:39 -0700
Subject:        Much Ado illustration

C. Dessen wrote regarding information on illustrations of _Much Ado_. There is
a painting by Robert Smirk, "The Examination of Conrade and Borachio." I
gleaned this information on the WWW from a wonderful site, _Shakespeare
Illustrated_ (by Harry Rusche, Emory University) available at the following
URL:

http://www.cc.emory.edu/ENGLISH/classes/Shakespeare_Illustrated/Shakespeare.html

While this particular piece isn't available for on-line viewing, many others
are.

Keith Richards  |  
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(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nick Clary <
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Date:           Monday, 13 May 1996 15:56:25 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        *Much Ado* Illustrations

Richard D. Altick's *Paintings from Books: Art and Literature in Britain,
1760-1900* (Ohio State UP, 1985) briefly surveys the most popular scenes chosen
by painters from *Much Ado* (pp. 272-3).  Among them, Beatrice overhearing Hero
and Ursula in the orchard (3.1) was the most popular.  According to Altick,
"about twenty paintings of the orchard scene are recorded from 1824 to 1884, at
least eight of them from the single decade 1850-60 and four more from 1863-67."
 Two other popular scenes were the fainting of Hero in church (4.1), and
Dogberry examining Conrade and Borachio in 4.2.  While Altick reproduces many
images in this compendious study, the *Much Ado* illustrations are not among
them.  He does, however, provide details that should make it fairly easy to
locate other images.  For example, Altick notes of the fainting of Hero: "As
the most dramatic episode in the play, it was especially subject to the
accusation of `theatricalism,' which reviewers held at the ready when paintings
from Shakespeare were exhibited.  In 1882, the scene became the subject of one
of the few notable late Victorian paintings when Forbes Robertson recorded on
canvas Henry Irving's eleborate staging at the Lyceum...."

Nick Clary
 

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