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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: May ::
Rushdie; Lanier
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0385.  Friday, 17 May 1996.

(1)     From:   Ted Nellen <
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        Date:   Thursday, 16 May 1996 11:53:06 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Rushdie at Folger

(2)     From:   Stephanie Hughes <
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        Date:   Thursday, 16 May 1996 17:27:06 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0377  Re: ADO Explication


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ted Nellen <
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Date:           Thursday, 16 May 1996 11:53:06 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Rushdie at Folger

Greetings,

In the May 13, 1996 issue of _The New Yorker_ in the "Talk of the Town"
section, there is a piece titled "The Folger Preambulation".  It relates
Rushdie's love of Shakespeare and he provides a neat literary word game he
plays.  As he explains: He was challenged to rename WS plays as if they were
written by Robert Ludlum.  For Hamlet he gave  "The Bourne Ultimatum" and "The
Scarlatti Inheritance".  For Macbeth he offered "The Dunsinane Deforestation".
Other titles included: "The Rialto Forfeit"; "The Capulet Infatuation"; "The
Kerchief Implication"; and "The Solstice Entrancement."

I hope this is a fun diversion.

Cheers,
Ted

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephanie Hughes <
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Date:           Thursday, 16 May 1996 17:27:06 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 7.0377  Re: ADO Explication
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0377  Re: ADO Explication

Florence Amit;

I am very interested in your paper on the Hebrew connections in MOV. How can I
read it? [Send GET SHAKS HEBREW to 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
  --HMC]

I am also interested in A. L. Rowse's theory that the Dark Lady in the sonnets
was Amelia Lanier, ne Bassano. A recent book on the Bassanos (will provide name
and author if anyone wishes, don't have it at the tip of my tongue) reveals
that although they were originally from Venice, they were in fact Sephardic
jews, and the move to the English Court was a final step in their exodus from
Spain in the 1490s. Amelia Lanier has been given importance in recent feminist
research and exegesis, since her book of religious poems, published in the
early 1600s, is the first book to be published in English by an Englishwoman
under her own name. It is also a truly feminist work in that it is dedicated to
several noblewomen and not to any men, and also in that her take on the various
bible stories is a truly feminist view. It is interesting that in the two
serious plays where Venice is the locale, the name Amelia features in one, the
name Bassanio in the other.

Stephanie Hughes
 

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