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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: May ::
Qs: Shakespeare and Virgil; What's in a Name?
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 7, No. 0388.  Friday, 17 May 1996.

(1)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Thursday, 16 May 1996 21:01:33 -0400
        Subj:   Hector and Camilla, Shakespeare and Virgil

(2)     From:   Wendy G. Thomas <
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        Date:   Thursday, 16 May 1996 09:33:28 -0700
        Subj:   What's in a Name?


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Thursday, 16 May 1996 21:01:33 -0400
Subject:        Hector and Camilla, Shakespeare and Virgil

I've been reading Robert Fitzgerald's translation of the *The Aeneid* recently,
and when I got to the passage where Camilla hunts Arruns for his armor and is
subsequently killed in battle (XII, 763-829), I was reminded of Hector's
hunting of the armor in *Troilus and Cressida* 5.6.43-44: "wilt thou not beast
abide? / Why then flye on, Ile hunt thee for thy hide."  The source is usually
given as Lydgate and/or Caxton, but I wonder if Virgil may also have been in
Shakespeare's mind: "Camilla / Began to track this man, her heart's desire /
Either to fit luxurious Trojan gear / On a temple door, or else herself to
flaunt / That golden plunder. Blindly, as a huntress, / Following him, and him
alone, of all / Who took part in the battle, she rode on . . . ." Virgil
describes Arruns' elaborate armour in detail. Of course, it's quite possible
that Lydgate and Caxton were thinking of this passage in *The Aeneid* when they
have Hector hunting the handsome armour of "a grekishe kinge."

Yours, Bill Godshalk

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Wendy G. Thomas <
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Date:           Thursday, 16 May 1996 09:33:28 -0700
Subject:        What's in a Name?

It is always startling to see this newsgroup sometimes use slang or casual
references to William Shakespeare (i.e.,Bill Shakespeare, Billy the Shake, Will
Speare, etc.) Do you have an opinion on it? I think it's much more interesting
than punctuation marks.
 

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