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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: December ::
Hamlet, Translated; Hymen; Macbeth and Witchcraft
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0900.  Sunday, 1 December 1996.

(1)     From:   Andrew Walker White <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 27 Nov 1996 13:42:32 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Hamlet, Translated

(2)     From:   John Velz <
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        Date:   Thursday, 28 Nov 1996 02:27:07 +0200
        Subj:   Hymen

(3)     From:   John Velz <
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        Date:   Thursday, 28 Nov 1996 02:51:07 +0200
        Subj:   Macbeth and Witchcraft


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Walker White <
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Date:           Wednesday, 27 Nov 1996 13:42:32 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Hamlet, Translated

Thanks for the correction Mr. Shepherd -- I must admit that the reason I
rendered it that way was to preserve the sound patterns.  Often the exact sense
was sacrificed in order to keep the patterns going.

Humbled,
Andy White
Urbana, IL

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <
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Date:           Thursday, 28 Nov 1996 02:27:07 +0200
Subject:        Hymen

I just returned from a week's absence from SHAKSPER to read the amusing
comments on Hymen.  Since I sort of started this by mentioning the Hymen in the
1996 RSC AYL in a list of actresses playing male roles, I might perhaps finish
the discussion by pointing out that the full figured woman with the imposing
white head of hair was not a "little old lady" (from Dubuque or elsewhere);
indeed she was so imposing that the story went round among wits in the lobby
afterward that this was Barbara Bush who was making a cameo appearance.

jwv

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <
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Date:           Thursday, 28 Nov 1996 02:51:07 +0200
Subject:        Macbeth and Witchcraft

The discussion of James's changing attitude toward witchcraft and how it may or
may not appear in Mac. is very interesting.  The likelihood that Shakespeare
intended to allude to James in the play is enhanced by consideration of
Othello, who is condemned by Brabantio in Act I as having practiced witchcraft
on his daughter, Desdemona, and by Lr. in which various bits of witchcraft are
alluded to.  James came to the throne in 1603; Oth. is 1604, Lr. 1605, Mac.
1606.  Of course Sh. was interested in witches in Err. long before anyone
thought of James, but there the business comes from Paul's Epistle to the
Ephesians and the Acts of The Apostles, in which the occult religion of Diana
of the Ephesians is condemned as diabolical.  As late as 1611 Shakespeare has
Leontes call the importunate Paulina "A mankind witch" (WT 2.3).

JWV
 

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