Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: December ::
Re: Shakespeare and Popular Culture
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0904.  Tuesday, 3 December 1996.

(1)     From:   Christine Jacobson <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Sunday, 1 Dec 1996 17:12:34 -0700
        Subj:   Shakespeare & Popular Culture, Suba Subbarro, Nov 14

(2)     From:   Martin Jukovsky <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Sunday, 1 Dec 1996 23:33:37 -0500
        Subj:   King Lear Digested


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Jacobson <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 1 Dec 1996 17:12:34 -0700
Subject:        Shakespeare & Popular Culture, Suba Subbarro, Nov 14

I noticed Suba's request for input on sources of Shakespear's influence in our
culture.  I can't think of anything off hand, as regards to advertising,

However, in a Children's Literature course at this college, I came across a
reference to Shakespeare in the well know book, "Where The Wild Things Are" by
Maurice Sendak.  In a critique of some of his works, authors, Schwartz and
Schwarts' "The Picture Book Comes of Age", American Library Association, 1991,
point out that Sendak puts his protagonist, Max, in a Henry V pose in the scene
at the door of his tent, with the monster at his side.  Any of your college
students could appreciate this, as I'm sure they've all heard of or read
Maurice Sendak's "Where The Wild Things Are", (unless, of course, they are new
americans or overseas student, in which case they might wonder about us North
Americans).

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Jukovsky <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 1 Dec 1996 23:33:37 -0500
Subject:        King Lear Digested

There is a wonderful, funny summary of King Lear that takes about a minute in
Bill Irwin's THE REGARD OF FLIGHT, an unclassifiable dance-pantomime-clown
piece.  It occurs about 5 minutes from the end. REGARD OF FLIGHT was originally
presented as part of Great Performances on PBS; it's available in many
libraries as a videotape in The MacArthur Library.

Martin Jukovsky
Cambridge, Mass.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.