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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: December ::
Re: Videos; Two Lords; Ossified Art
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0947.  Saturday, 14 December 1996.

(1)     From:   Deanna Gregg <
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        Date:   Friday, 13 Dec 1996 11:28:33 -0800
        Subj:   SHK 7.0940  Re: Shakespeare Films and Videos -Reply

(2)     From:   Joseph "Chepe" Lockett <
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        Date:   Friday, 13 Dec 1996 14:55:40 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0940  Re: Shakespeare Films and Videos

(3)     From:   Andrew Walker White <
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        Date:   Friday, 13 Dec 1996 19:05:17 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Ossified Art


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Deanna Gregg <
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Date:           Friday, 13 Dec 1996 11:28:33 -0800
Subject: Re: Shakespeare Films and Videos -Reply
Comment:        SHK 7.0940  Re: Shakespeare Films and Videos -Reply

Many thanks for responses re the "Kiss Me, Petruchio" video.  B. Geisey says it
can be found through:

     Films Incorporated Video
     5547 N. Ravenswood Ave.
     Chicago, IL 60640-1199
     (800) 323-4200  or (312) 878-2600 x329.

We're still looking for the Polanski one.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joseph "Chepe" Lockett <
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Date:           Friday, 13 Dec 1996 14:55:40 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 7.0940  Re: Shakespeare Films and Videos
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0940  Re: Shakespeare Films and Videos

Charles Ross comments:
> For hidden eros, you really can't beat the two French lords in Alls Well, 3.6.

Perhaps I'm missing some common critical interpretation, but a quick glance at
the online text at available at "http://the-tech.mit.edu/Shakespeare/
Comedy/allswellthatendswell/allswellthatendswell.3.6.html" doesn't show
anything but the plotting against Parolles and a segue towards the Helena/
Widow scene.  Certainly nothing with quite so much homoerotic potential (in
choice, not in necessity) as Antonio's first scene with Sebastian.

If you see something different, however, I'd love to hear about it.

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Walker White <
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Date:           Friday, 13 Dec 1996 19:05:17 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Ossified Art

While I agree that the Beijing Opera performers, by the end of the film, were
pretty much marginalized and their art form stale, I would direct Mr. Egan and
others to the rousing atmosphere of the original opera house, one at least as
chaotic and proletarian as the Globe.  Sure, there were rules on how to
perform, and there were traditions to be respected, but they were there not for
the sake of having rules, they existed because it was what people loved to see.

The competition among vendors in the pre-revolutionary Chinese theatre was
raucous and a part of the spectacle, and people sang along with their favorite
tunes, etc.  Spontaneity was permitted in the context of a performance in those
days, much as it was in Shakespeare's day.

Mao and his wife ignored all that when they ditched and murdered the Beijing
Opera, and wouldn't you know it, the "revolutionary opera" mounted in its place
was a pathetic imitation of stale, melodramatic western operatic forms, utterly
drained of any Chinese cultural elements the Beijing Opera had.  Don't take my
word for it -- see Beijing Opera and then check out "taking tiger mountain by
strategy" and you'll see there is simply no comparison.  The former is great
entertainment, colorful and aimed to please.  The latter is monotone, and in
spite of the talented actors performing in it, the westernization of Chinese
theatre is an artistic and cultural disaster.

And I find it particularly heartening that in times of despotism, Shakespeare
has been used frequently to get around the authorities and hold real protests
against the regime.

Andy White
Urbana, IL
 

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