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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: December ::
Re: Nedar's Daughter
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0976.  Friday, 27 December 1996.

(1)     From:   John Drakakis <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 24 Dec 1996 01:48:16 -0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 7.0972 Nedar's Daughter

(2)     From:   Cristina Keunecke <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 24 Dec 1996 06:22:02 -0300
        Subj:   Re: Nedar's daughter


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Drakakis <
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Date:           Tuesday, 24 Dec 1996 01:48:16 -0000
Subject: 7.0972 Nedar's Daughter
Comment:        RE: SHK 7.0972 Nedar's Daughter

Try Terry Hawkes' Meaning By Shakespeare

Cheers
John  Drakakis

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cristina Keunecke <
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Date:           Tuesday, 24 Dec 1996 06:22:02 -0300
Subject:        Re: Nedar's daughter

To Chris:

As you know, I am interested about MND's Helena's character (as well the other
shakespearean Helena - from All's Well That Ends Well). And I am also curious
about her father, the "old Nedar". I have checked all my classical and
mythological sources in the attempt to know who is he, but I didn't find
anything. About your reference in NEDAR being an anagram of ARDEN, I must
confess that I am really not able to discuss that, because I am not very
familiar to the complete Shakespeare's biography and to the Sonnets. But as you
said  in your last e-mail message to me, it's possible that Shakespeare maybe
had identified with Helena (and as you said, with the both). And I don't know
if its correct to say this, but, in MY opinion, at least in the comedies, it
seems that Shakespeare had painted the female characters much more colorfull
than the male characters.

I don't know if this could help you, but only by reading the play MND, I have
formulated some ideas about Nedar. Helena's father doesn't seem to be an
important figure. I THINK he is a man without political and financial means,
the opposite of Egeus, Hermia's father. He does not appear in the scenes, he is
mentioned by the others only two times, even though his presence could be
important. Like Egeus, who had appealed to the Duke to solve the matter of his
daugther's mariage, Nedar could also had spoken to Theseus about Demetrius's
broken vows to his daughter Helena and could asked for a solution. However, it
seems that he has no power to ask for this. And this lack of political
influence can give us more information about the initial rivalry between
Lysander and Demetrius. It could be not only a rivalry for love, but also a
rivalry for power. It's possible that Demetrius, seeing that Lysander, getting
married with Egeus's daughter, would have more political power than he, who was
to be married with Nedar's daughter, had decieded to reject Helena and tried to
win Egeu's agreement to the match with Hermia. (And looking in this point of
view at the other Helena - in All's Well That Ends Well -, Demetrius's
rejection to his former fiance, seems to be very similar to that of Bertram).

Yours,
Cristina Keunecke

P.S. I want to tell you that my e-mail address has changed. Now, it is the
following: <
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