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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: December ::
Re: Film Suggestions; Branagh Hamlet; Knight's
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0977.  Friday, 27 December 1996.

(1)     From:   Gerda Grice <
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        Date:   Monday, 23 Dec 1996 11:43:53 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0967 Re: Film Suggestions for Shakespeare Magazine

(2)     From:   JoAnna Koskinen <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 25 Dec 1996 01:14:50 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0969 Re: Branagh *Hamlet

(3)     From:   Judy Kennedy <
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        Date:   Monday, 23 Dec 1996 14:31:57 -0400 (AST)
        Subj:   Knight's Imperial Shakspere


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gerda Grice <
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Date:           Monday, 23 Dec 1996 11:43:53 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 7.0967 Re: Film Suggestions for Shakespeare Magazine
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0967 Re: Film Suggestions for Shakespeare Magazine

The play that I would like to see on film is _The Winter's Tale_. My first
choices for Leontes and Hermione are the now ex real life spouses Kenneth
Branagh and Emma Thompson.  (Kate Nelligan would be a very acceptable second
choice as Hermione, though.)  As Perdita and Florizel, my first choices would
be Emma Fielding and Rufus Sewell.  They were excellent together in Stoppard's
_Arcadia_ in London a few years ago; and Fielding's performance as Penthea in
John Ford's _The Broken Heart_ a year or two later was quite spectacular.

What I hope the director will resist is a) the temptation to lard his/her cast
list with big name actors whose sole qualification for their roles is their box
office value and b) the temptationoto use camera + computer trickery to
"assist" the magic of Hermione's "resurrection".

Gerda Grice
Ryerson Polytechnic University
Toronto, Canada

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           JoAnna Koskinen <
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Date:           Wednesday, 25 Dec 1996 01:14:50 -0500
Subject: 7.0969 Re: Branagh *Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0969 Re: Branagh *Hamlet

Hello,

There is a question as to whether or not there has been a second, shorter
version of Branaugh's "Hamlet," and I'd like to get some input as to what
Branaugh is trying to accomplish.

Now, Siskel and Ebert -- both who loved the movie --- said there was a shorter
version. There's also a website alluding to this, but, last week, Branaugh came
to Marin County for a special showing of the film along with Derek Jacobi and
Robin Williams -- It was wonderful!! -- and he(kenneth) insisted there was no
shorter version. Could it be that he is afraid that people will reject the
longer version if this is so?

The film is wonderful as I said before, and though I could understand the need
to shorten it -- I believe that Jack Lemmon's part is of no importance
whatsoever -- I certainly hope that they wait a while.

JoAnna Koskinen

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judy Kennedy <
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Date:           Monday, 23 Dec 1996 14:31:57 -0400 (AST)
Subject:        Knight's Imperial Shakspere

It is certainly true that Charles Knight published many editions of
Shakespeare's works from 1838-42 on through a large part of the century.
However, I would hesitate to identify the Imperial edition with the Pictorial
edition.  The 1838-42 edition 'The Pictorial edition of the works of
Shakspere', is referred to under the siglum KNT1 in the New Variorum editions.
It was frequently reprinted under that name, not always by Knight himself, into
the 60s and 70s, at least.  However, other Shakespeare editions by Knight were
given different names.  KNT2, of 1842-44, is referred to as the 'Library
edition' or the 'National Edition'.  KNT3 is the siglum used in the NV for 'the
second edition revised' of the Pictorial edition, published by G. Routledge &
Sons in 1867.  (There are textual variants in all three of these texts, I am
informed by my colleague.) Knight also put out a 'Cabinet Edition' and a
'Companion Edition.'  The 'Stratford Shakespeare' also employed Knight's text.

But I believe the title 'Imperial Edition' was first used of Virtue's London
edition of 1873-76, reprinted by Virtue in London 1875-76, and by Virtue and
Yorston in New York at the same date.

I do not think that volumes called the Imperial edition, and carrying the
imprint of Virtue and Yorston, can date from earlier than 1875-6.  However, I
certainly wouldn't be prepared to claim that they were not later, though I
don't know of later reprints of the Imperial edition.  (But Virtue's
'Shakespeare Gallery' [1879], listed by Jaggard at 546a, contains steel
engravings from the Imperial edition.)

Judy Kennedy

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