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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: December ::
12th Night; Ophelia's Antifertility Herbs; Falling in
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0978.  Friday, 27 December 1996.

(1)     From:   Virginia M. Byrne <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 24 Dec 1996 18:36:11 -0500
        Subj:   12th Night

(2)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 25 Dec 1996 13:56:58 -0500
        Subj:   Ophelia's Antifertility Herbs

(3)     From:   Chris Stroffilino <
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        Date:   Friday, 27 Dec 1996 05:43:06 -0500
        Subj:   Falling in Love


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Virginia M. Byrne <
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Date:           Tuesday, 24 Dec 1996 18:36:11 -0500
Subject:        12th Night

I am running a "12th Night" celebration on Jan 6 at our school. Other than
"Feast of Fools overseen by the Lord of Misrule ....servants served by
masters.".. I can't find anything about the Elizabethan celebration..anyone
help?

Merry Christmas everyone...I love reading all your discussions.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Wednesday, 25 Dec 1996 13:56:58 -0500
Subject:        Ophelia's Antifertility Herbs

One of my colleagues, Lowanne Jones, brings John Riddle's <italic>Contraception
and Abortion from the Ancient World to the Renaissance</italic> (Cambridge:
Harvard UP, 1992) 106-107, to my attention. She points out that many of the
antifertility herbs listed by Riddle are also mentioned by Ophelia.

As I recall, this is not new news (i.e., that Ophelia's list is associated with
antifertility), but it is interesting that Riddle apparently was not thinking
of Shakespeare or Ophelia when he compiled his list. Neither Shakespeare nor
Hamlet appears in the Index.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Stroffilino <
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Date:           Friday, 27 Dec 1996 05:43:06 -0500
Subject:        Falling in Love

Hey, another stupid question that comes up over the holidays-- Harold Bloom is
running around saying that Rosalind's use of the phrase "falling in love" in AS
YOU LIKE IT is the first use of that phrase in the English language. Although I
have not found an earlier use of that phrase, I am not the most well-read
SHAKSPERian in earlier literatures. Does anybody want to prove Bloom wrong? If
people didn't fall in love before Sx (i don't mean sex, sorry), WHAT did they
do (tie it to anchors like Wyatt?). Thanks, chris stroffolino
 

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