1996

ACTER Spring 1997 Tour

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0901.  Tuesday, 3 December 1996.

From:           Cynthia Dessen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 30 Nov 1996 16:20:36 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        ACTER Spring 1997 Tour

ACTER's Spring 1997 Tour of Actors from the London Stage will perform *Romeo
and Juliet* (completely different production from the F95 version) at the
following campuses: Feb. 3-9, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, IL;
Feb. 10-16, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL; Feb. 17-23, Calvin
College, Grand Rapids, MI; Feb. 24-March 2, Allegheny College, Meadville, PA
and Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock, PA; March 3-9 Santa Monica
College, Santa Monica, CA; March 10-16, Berea College, Berea, KY; March 17-23,
University of the Ozarks, Clarksville, AR; March 24-30 New Mexico State
University, Las Cruces, NM; March 31-April 6, LaSalle University, Philadelphia,
PA. The 1997-98 season of *Measure for Measure* and *Midsummer Night's Dream*
is almost booked; to see schedule or for more info on ACTER, visit our website
at http://www.unc.edu/depts/acter/ or call Cynthia Dessen, Manager,
919-967-4265.

Hamlet, Translated; Hymen; Macbeth and Witchcraft

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0900.  Sunday, 1 December 1996.

(1)     From:   Andrew Walker White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 27 Nov 1996 13:42:32 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Hamlet, Translated

(2)     From:   John Velz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 28 Nov 1996 02:27:07 +0200
        Subj:   Hymen

(3)     From:   John Velz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 28 Nov 1996 02:51:07 +0200
        Subj:   Macbeth and Witchcraft


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Walker White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 27 Nov 1996 13:42:32 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Hamlet, Translated

Thanks for the correction Mr. Shepherd -- I must admit that the reason I
rendered it that way was to preserve the sound patterns.  Often the exact sense
was sacrificed in order to keep the patterns going.

Humbled,
Andy White
Urbana, IL

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 28 Nov 1996 02:27:07 +0200
Subject:        Hymen

I just returned from a week's absence from SHAKSPER to read the amusing
comments on Hymen.  Since I sort of started this by mentioning the Hymen in the
1996 RSC AYL in a list of actresses playing male roles, I might perhaps finish
the discussion by pointing out that the full figured woman with the imposing
white head of hair was not a "little old lady" (from Dubuque or elsewhere);
indeed she was so imposing that the story went round among wits in the lobby
afterward that this was Barbara Bush who was making a cameo appearance.

jwv

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 28 Nov 1996 02:51:07 +0200
Subject:        Macbeth and Witchcraft

The discussion of James's changing attitude toward witchcraft and how it may or
may not appear in Mac. is very interesting.  The likelihood that Shakespeare
intended to allude to James in the play is enhanced by consideration of
Othello, who is condemned by Brabantio in Act I as having practiced witchcraft
on his daughter, Desdemona, and by Lr. in which various bits of witchcraft are
alluded to.  James came to the throne in 1603; Oth. is 1604, Lr. 1605, Mac.
1606.  Of course Sh. was interested in witches in Err. long before anyone
thought of James, but there the business comes from Paul's Epistle to the
Ephesians and the Acts of The Apostles, in which the occult religion of Diana
of the Ephesians is condemned as diabolical.  As late as 1611 Shakespeare has
Leontes call the importunate Paulina "A mankind witch" (WT 2.3).

JWV

Re: New Globe Schedule

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0898.  Sunday, 1 December 1996.

(1)     From:   Patricia Cooke <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 28 Nov 1996 09:43:16 +1200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0894  Q: New Globe Schedule

(2)     From:   Andrew J. Gurr <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 28 Nov 1996 12:39:01 +0000 (GMT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0894  Q: New Globe Schedule

(3)     From:   Carol Light <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 29 Nov 1996 12:23:01 -0500
        Subj:   Re: New Globe - Performances and Schedule


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patricia Cooke <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 28 Nov 1996 09:43:16 +1200
Subject: 7.0894  Q: New Globe Schedule
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0894  Q: New Globe Schedule

>Can anyone advise me on whether firm dates have been established for the first
>season at the new Globe?  I did some quick browsing on the Web site and
>couldn't find the information.

As far as we know down here, the Globe has a Festival of Firsts starting on 8
June 1997 and lasting until 23 June.  These will be big occasion for the final
official Opening, Royals etc.  Special Events, a Ball, and two productions,
known so far as Red Play and White Play.  Most are for specially invited guests
and VIPs and people who have contributed to the project.  No more news of
further seasons, repertory or otherwise, but these will follow hard upon the
Opening  -  we hope!

Their e-mail address is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Good luck.
Pat

Patricia Cooke, Secretary & Editor
Shakespeare Globe Centre New Zealand Inc
97 Elizabeth Street Wellington 6001 New Zealand PH/FAX 64 4 3856743

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew J. Gurr <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 28 Nov 1996 12:39:01 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: 7.0894  Q: New Globe Schedule
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0894  Q: New Globe Schedule

The Southwark Globe will be opening on 27 May 1997, with initially two plays,
and later two more run in repertory. The season will end late September. The U.
of Reading web page will be publishing the full performance schedule (and
booking details) shortly.... though the actual plays won't be announced till
the end of December.

Andy Gurr.

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carol Light <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 29 Nov 1996 12:23:01 -0500
Subject:        Re: New Globe - Performances and Schedule

Barrett Fisher asked a question to which I do not know the answer, but, as an
attorney, that just doesn't stop me.

When I was in London this past summer, I became a Friend of the Shakepeare's
Globe, thus receiving their various quarterly mailings.  No word yet about
schedule, but the fall edition said that they hoped to have the stage re-built
by March of 1997, since the one they were using this summer for their Prologue
Season was a temporary.  The Prologue Season had only one production, and I
don't recall anything being said about a permanent company or rotating
productions quite yet.

As it happened, I was there during the opening week and wasn't able to get
tickets.  Did anyone on this list see the production?  The space was very
exciting -- much more intimate than one would be led to expect -- with no one
really being further than about 50 yards from the stage (due to the steep
stacked stadium seating) .  This Globe has no darkened space and lighted stage
-- productions take place in natural daylight and the space is floodlit at
night, meaning actors and audience can see each other at all times.
Apparently, the London audiences took to participatory Shakespeare with great
relish, cheering, booing, trying to get the actors to engage with spectators.
One of the guides even speculated that the current London dandies would once
again come to the theatre to be seen, since the boxes adjacent to the stage
were as visible to all as the play.

It  will, I think, open up new vistas for actors and audience alike.

Q: Trevor Nunn's *Twelfth Night*

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0899.  Sunday, 1 December 1996.

From:           John King <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 27 Nov 1996 08:41:29 -0600
Subject:        12th Night

Amidst all the clamor about the Luhrmann "Romeo & Juliet," I have heard nothing
about Trevor Nunn's new film of "Twelfth Night."  Personally I thought it was
not only a hundred times better as Shakespeare but also at least ten times
better as a film.  But other than expressing my belief that Ben Kingsley is a
god, I will withhold further comment at this point.  I am just interested in
hearing what other people think about the film.

John King
Platypus Theatre Troupe
Arizona

Re: Shakespeare and the Unities

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0897.  Sunday, 1 December 1996.

(1)     From:   David Evett <R0870%This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday,  27 Nov 1996 11:15 ET
        Subj:   SHK 7.0888  Q: Shakespeare and the Unities

(2)     From:   Andrew Walker White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 27 Nov 1996 14:46:47 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Italian Unities


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <R0870%This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday,  27 Nov 1996 11:15 ET
Subject: Q: Shakespeare and the Unities
Comment:        SHK 7.0888  Q: Shakespeare and the Unities

Sidney does in fact complain of the failure of English drama to observe the
unities, since even _Gorboduc_, the best he knows, "is faulty both in place and
time, the two necessary companions of all corporal actions.  For where the
stage should always represent but one place, and the uttermost time presupposed
in it should be, both by Aristotle's precept gand common reason, but one day,
there is both many days and many places inartificially imagined." Such matters
were presumably discussed and even observed in and around the academic drama of
Oxford and Cambridge.  English theatrical practice, indeed, was far
different--"But if it be so in _Gorboduc_, how much more in all the rest, where
you shall have Asia of the one side, and Afric of the other, and so many
under-kingdoms that the player, when he comes in, much ever begin with telling
where he is, or else the tale will not be conceived?"  This sounds a lot like
_Tamburlane_, though Sidney's _Defense_ is usually thought to have been written
before Marlowe's epics took the stage.  Shakespeare, of course, observes the
unities pretty closely in _Err_, the play most closely based on classical
models, and in _Tem_, though both take advantage of the generalized Elizabethan
stage to blur distinctions of place; it's worth thinking about the ways in
which the formal constraints operate to enhance the probability of
improbability and the urgency of time, themes in both plays.  Otherwise, he and
his contemporaries--even Jonson, the most classical of them--seem disposed to
treat the strict unities as just one among many structural options.

Neo-classically,
Dave Evett

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Walker White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 27 Nov 1996 14:46:47 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Italian Unities

In response to the question about the so-called Unities, I can add that
Machiavelli -- no mean playwright himself -- did some wonderful lampooning of
this concept in his 'Mandragola', in the 1500's.

The wickedest take he has on it comes when the protagonist finally bags his
lady for a tryst, and in order to excuse the passage of an entire night before
the next scene resumes, ol' Mach has a guy come out and say that the Unities
are still preserved, since nobody will be getting much sleep under the
circumstances (least of all the hero).

I'm sure there are other satires of this concept, but this has to be my
favorite.

Andy White
Urbana, IL

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