1996

Q: New Globe Schedule

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0894.  Wednesday, 27 November 1996.

From:           Barrett Fisher <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 26 Nov 1996 11:17:11 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Re: Globe Schedule

Can anyone advise me on whether firm dates have been established for the first
season at the new Globe?  I did some quick browsing on the Web site and
couldn't find the information.

My college runs a study abroad program in England every other year; because of
the change in the RSC Stratford schedule we are seriously contemplating a
change from a fall to a spring program; however, if the new Globe schedule runs
from mid-May to early September (as I have heard rumored), we may be less
likely to catch those performances during a spring program which would end in
early May than we would in a fall program which begins in late August (sorry
for the Dickensian sprawl of that sentence!)

Also, does anyone know if the new Globe will have a repertory schedule like the
RSC, or a serial run?  Again, this makes a big difference in deciding when to
come in on a season.

I hope this sort of query is appropriate for this list.

Barrett Fisher
Bethel College (MN)

Re: Popular Culture; Modern "To be . . ."

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0893.  Wednesday, 27 November 1996.

(1)     From:   David Hale <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 26 Nov 96 13:42:23 EST
        Subj:   [Re: Popular Culture]

(2)     From:   Scott Shepherd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 26 Nov 1996 18:47:36 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0878  Hamlet, translated


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Hale <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 26 Nov 96 13:42:23 EST
Subject:        [Re: Popular Culture]

Another example of Shakespeare in popular culture is a novel for young people
by Avi Wortis, "Romeo and Juliet Together (and Alive!) At Last" (Orchard Books,
1987). The story is about a group of eighth graders who put on the play; there
are numerous parallels between the play and its cast. The whole book is quite
funny.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Shepherd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 26 Nov 1996 18:47:36 -0500
Subject: 7.0878  Hamlet, translated
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0878  Hamlet, translated

The "respect" doesn't make life a catastrophe, it makes calamity long-lived.

Re: Huntington Library

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0891.  Wednesday, 27 November 1996.

(1)     From:   Marlin E. Blaine <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 26 Nov 1996 11:30:36 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0885  Re: Huntington Library

(2)     From:   Jean R. Brink <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 26 Nov 1996 13:54:51 -0700 (MST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0885  Re: Huntington Library


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marlin E. Blaine <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 26 Nov 1996 11:30:36 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 7.0885  Re: Huntington Library
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0885  Re: Huntington Library

> If you go to the Huntington don't miss the Francis Bacon Library in Claremont.

The Bacon Library in Claremont was a lovely place to work and it held a
remarkable collection not only of Baconiana but also of emblem books.  It
recently closed, however, and the Huntington took over the bulk of its
holdings.  I believe that the rare books will constitute a distinct collection
within the Huntington, while the reference books that were not sold off in the
sale of duplicates held last spring are to be integrated into the Huntington's
reference collection.

Marlin E. Blaine

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jean R. Brink <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 26 Nov 1996 13:54:51 -0700 (MST)
Subject: 7.0885  Re: Huntington Library
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0885  Re: Huntington Library

Just a note to clarify the location of the Francis Bacon library.  The
collection is now at the Huntington Library.

Jean R. Brink
English Department
Arizona State University

Re: Elitism and Politics

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0892.  Wednesday, 27 November 1996.

(1)     From:   David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 26 Nov 1996 19:09:46 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0882  Elitism

(2)     From:   Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 26 Nov 1996 21:25:44 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0882

(3)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 26 Nov 1996 22:09:18 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0882  Re: Politics and Interpretation


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 26 Nov 1996 19:09:46 GMT
Subject: 7.0882  Elitism
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0882  Elitism

On elitism: a true story.  A fish and chip shop owner in Bridge of Allan
protested violently to me many years ago about the 'elitism' of the local Arts
Centre.  When asked what he wanted instead of the fare provided he said
'Verdi'! 'Verdi'! - but then, he was Italian.  Surely, given all his other
pronouncements, Gabriel Egan must recognise that the definition of 'elite'
culture is very precisely socially and historically generated - and that at any
time Shakespeare might be appropriated in very different interests?

David Lindley

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 26 Nov 1996 21:25:44 -0800
Subject: 7.0882
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0882

Andy White wrote,

>It is true that people with too much money have a patronizing interest in the
>arts -- but for you to take that small fact and tar the whole profession with
>one brush is extreme.  It's also one of the reasons I frankly despise Marxists,
>because they haven't spent much time in the hinterlands as I have, getting to
>know real people who get real enjoyment and meaning from the theatrical
>experience.

No, you're right! I've been mixing with imaginary people on the coast. It makes
all the difference...

Best of luck with your productions.

Gabriel Egan

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 26 Nov 1996 22:09:18 -0500
Subject: 7.0882  Re: Politics and Interpretation
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0882  Re: Politics and Interpretation

I think John Drakakis and I agree: Althusser can not be understood unless one
reads Marx first.  But I would go further and ask: why read Althusser at all?

And, of course, Marx cannot be understood without a thorough knowledge of
Hegel, Kant, Descartes, and, some would argue, Plato.  No, there are texts--all
the way down.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

Re: Shakespeare and the Unities

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0890.  Wednesday, 27 November 1996.

(1)     From:   C. David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 26 Nov 1996 12:05:50 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0888  Q: Shakespeare and the Unities

(2)     From:   Rick Jones <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 26 Nov 1996 16:19:14 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0888 Q: Shakespeare and the Unities


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           C. David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 26 Nov 1996 12:05:50 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 7.0888  Q: Shakespeare and the Unities
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0888  Q: Shakespeare and the Unities

> Shakespeare paid little heed to the classical unities (time, place, and
> action), especially when the story just couldn't be stuffed into the confines
> of 24 hours and one location.

If by the classical unities you mean Aristotle, then you need to revise the
question.  In the Poetics the only unity Aristotle mentions is unity of action
(something that, arguably, Shakespeare also adheres to). Although Aristotle
mentions place and duration of action it is not until the Renaissance and after
that these became codified in theory, though often ignored in practice.

C. David Frankel
University of South Florida

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rick Jones <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 26 Nov 1996 16:19:14 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 7.0888 Q: Shakespeare and the Unities
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0888 Q: Shakespeare and the Unities

Re Keith Ghormley's question about the "classical unities." There's no such
thing: the concept of unities of time, place and action was a neo-Classical
(mostly Italian, partially French) invention.  Aristotle speaks of what can be
called a unity of action, but mentions time only in passing, and place not at
all.  The neo-Classicists, on the other hand, emphasized time and place even
more than action (cf. the furor over Corneille's _Le Cid_).

Certainly Shakespeare was not alone among English playwrights in ignoring
unities: witness _Gorboduc_ or _Cambyses_ or _Doctor Faustus_ or _Bartholomew
Fair_.  Sidney's Defense of Poesie seems, at least, to revel in the difference
between England and Everywhere Else.  Still, I suspect that English playwrights
ignored the unities not for patriotic reasons, but because 1) they could and 2)
they felt like it.

I know of no contemporary Italian productions of Shakspeare-- they were as
parochial in their way as Shakespeare was in his.

Hope this helps.

Rick Jones
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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