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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: November ::
Re: Shakespeare as Character
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0804.  Monday, 11 November 1996.

(1)     From:   Patrick Gillespie <
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        Date:   Saturday, 9 Nov 1996 12:02:39 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 7.0802  Re: Shakespeare as Character

(2)     From:   Adrian Kiernander <
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        Date:   Monday, 11 Nov 1996 16:19:49 +1100 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0802  Re: Shakespeare as Character


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patrick Gillespie <
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Date:           Saturday, 9 Nov 1996 12:02:39 -0500
Subject: 7.0802  Re: Shakespeare as Character
Comment:        RE: SHK 7.0802  Re: Shakespeare as Character

Shakespeare may also be found in an Episode of Northern Exposure which, if I
remember correctly, centers around Chris's (the radio D.J.'s) effort to pass an
oral examination in which [New Criticism?] becomes a central concern. It's a
brilliant episode. Shakespeare, unfortunately, is shot (in one of Chris's WW
II-like dream sequences) while trying to defend himself from the New Critiques.
Shakespeare, the poor man, ,mistakenly quotes Edgar Allen Poe in his death
throes. I wish I had this episode on tape.

Patrick Gillespie

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Adrian Kiernander <
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Date:           Monday, 11 Nov 1996 16:19:49 +1100 (EST)
Subject: 7.0802  Re: Shakespeare as Character
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0802  Re: Shakespeare as Character

I have to take exception to Terence Hawkes's statement that David Williamson,
who put Shakespeare on stage in _Dead White Males_, is "said to be Australia's
finest playwright". It may be true, strictly speaking, that some people have
said this, but there are many more (especially the critics) who have said other
things. This has led to famous fax-wars across the Australian continent as
Williamson defends his position.

It is indisputable that Williamson has been for many years the most prominent
and consistently  popular Australian playwright. His plays have saved many of
the currently existing theatre companies from bankruptcy. He has written some
very successful and funny plays, and can be wonderful at biting social satire.
But he is in my opinion less successful at being solemn, and _Dead White Males_
was not well received critically, though like almost anything with his name on
it, it did well at the box office.

Adrian Kiernander
Department of Theatre Studies
University of New England
 

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