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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: November ::
Re: WT; RSC; Gloucester's Blinding; Politics
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0820.  Tuesday, 12 November 1996.

(1)     From:   Adrian Kiernander <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 12 Nov 1996 13:45:08 +1100 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0809  WT Query

(2)     From:   Sara Vandenberg <
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        Date:   Monday, 11 Nov 1996 20:02:27 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0813  Re: Stratford

(3)     From:   Frank Whigham <
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        Date:   Monday, 11 Nov 1996 23:25:42 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0810  Re: Staging Gloucester's Blinding

(4)     From:   Sydney Kasten <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 12 Nov 1996 10:28:00 +0200 (IST)
        Subj:   Politics?


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Adrian Kiernander <
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Date:           Tuesday, 12 Nov 1996 13:45:08 +1100 (EST)
Subject: 7.0809  WT Query
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0809  WT Query

Jesus Cora

For a discussion of the imagery of witchcraft in _WT_, try Stephen Orgel's
"Mankind Witches", and the introduction to his recently released OUP edition of
_WT_, which has come out, I think (my copy is at home), in the World's Classics
series.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sara Vandenberg <
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Date:           Monday, 11 Nov 1996 20:02:27 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 7.0813  Re: Stratford
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0813  Re: Stratford

People planning to visit Stratford and/or London can get the RSC schedule free
on the internet through several theatre homepages.  I found two or three by
consulting Voice of the Shuttle and Yahoo, and was able to plan my schedule
last summer quite easily.

Sara van den Berg
University of Washington

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frank Whigham <
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Date:           Monday, 11 Nov 1996 23:25:42 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 7.0810  Re: Staging Gloucester's Blinding
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0810  Re: Staging Gloucester's Blinding

I've always thought that Gloucester's plea on Lear's behalf at 3.7.59-60
(Bevington), "I would not see thy cruel nails / Pluck out his poor old eyes,"
was the direct stimulus to the act, performed by both husband and wife: she
plucks them out with her typifying nails, he stamps on them (inversion, as with
Prospero's "my foot my tutor?"). I think the teamwork (as monstrous marital
support) and the female/daughter's agency both important, the latter esp. in
light of Janet Adelman's analysis of "The dark and vicious place where thee he
got / Cost him his eyes" (5.3.175-76 -- see Suffocating Mothers), where the
female is read as the source of, cause, of blindness. Cf. the eye-plucking and
casting out upon the ground (the clay, anyway), in Lear's self-threat at
1.4.300-01 and his surely related fantasy of Regan's nails flaying Goneril's
visage five lines later.

Frank Whigham

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sydney Kasten <
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Date:           Tuesday, 12 Nov 1996 10:28:00 +0200 (IST)
Subject:        Politics?

Gabriel Egan asserts:

A symbolic system in which a narrative cannot be constructed would not be a
language, so again this fact ("languages do -in fact- display an innate ability
to construct narratives") is a tautology.

and asks:

A symbolic system limited to mere assertion (eg "fish like water", or "e=mcc")
or denotation ("LET X =WINDSPEED", or "RED = STOP, GREEN = GO") is not a
language, is it?

How about *Me Tarzan, you Jane*? Or how about **How about *Me Tarzan, you Jane*
**?  Or how about *declaration is not narration*.

Doesn't *narrative* imply a time factor? A lot of information can be exchanged
without the use of *and then ...*.  One can use the terms narrative and
language as broadly or as narrowly as one wishes, but in my view the first two
words of this posting are declarative rather than narrative. They are the
introduction to an argument, and are no more narration the signature on a
painting.  Narrative, to me, implies the recounting by the narrator of a
sequence of events  with the expectation that the auditor will have some kind
of vicarious appreciation of the the experience of these events.  I would
submit that the greater part of human intercourse, including the volumes of
opinion and information exchanged on this list comprise some form of language
distinct from narrative.

How about:  narration:language=dance:locomotion

Locomotion does not require the rhythms and the sequences of dance to be useful
and language does not require narrative.  Thus human modes of movement display
an innate capacity do construct dance and "languages do -in fact- display an
innate ability to construct narratives"

Sincerely
Sydney Kasten
 

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