Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: November ::
Re: Rhetorical Resources
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0822.  Wednesday, 13 November 1996.

(1)     From:   David Lindley <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 12 Nov 1996 16:16:03 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0818  Re: Rhetorical Resources

(2)     From:   Nicholas Jones <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 12 Nov 1996 11:39:30 -0400
        Subj:   RE-  Rhetorical Resources

(3)     From:   Paul Lord <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 12 Nov 1996 09:16:55 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: Rhetorical Resources

(4)     From:   Nell Benjamin <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 12 Nov 1996 13:15:28 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0818 Re: Rhetorical Resources


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Lindley <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 12 Nov 1996 16:16:03 GMT
Subject: 7.0818  Re: Rhetorical Resources
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0818  Re: Rhetorical Resources

There are a number of useful books on rhetoric - as I'm sure many will point
out.  Brian Vickers's *Classical Rhetoric in English Poetry* (1970) is a very
readable introduction, which includes an analysis of Sonnet 129.  sister Miriam
Joseph's * Rhetoric in Shakespeare's Time* (1962), a recension of a much longer
work, has a lot of useful information, though it's rather indigestibly
presented.  Lanham's essential reference book has already been mentioned.  I do
think it's essential to convey to students the nature  of the rhetorical
training all writers would have had, and to help them to recognise that
'rhetorical' is not a boo-word; whether it's so important to know your
anadiplosis from your epanorthosis is a moot point.

David Lindley
School of English
University of Leeds

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nicholas Jones <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 12 Nov 1996 11:39:30 -0400
Subject:        RE-  Rhetorical Resources

A useful tool in teaching (and just trying to remember) figures of rhetoric is
Richard A. Lanham's Handlist of Rhetorical Terms ( Univ. of Calif. Press, 1969,
2nd ed 1992).  I think it's still in print in paper.

Nick Jones, Oberlin College

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Lord <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 12 Nov 1996 09:16:55 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Re: Rhetorical Resources

Eric Armstrong asks:
>So far I am looking at Gert Ronberg's  _A way with WORDS: The language of
>English Renaissance literature_ ISBN 0-340-49307-0 as a great source of
>non-Shakespearean examples, and pronunciations of each term.
>
>Other recommendations?

I like _Figures of Speech: 60 ways to turn a phrase_ by Arthur Quinn, and _The
Rhetoric of Fiction_ by Wayne Booth.

Online, there is nothing so comprehensive, but if you need a quick jog to the
memory, I've found the page at

http://cal.bemidji.msus.edu/English/Resources/RhetFigures.html

very useful.  It's got competent examples, and is the easiest reference to get
to without taking my hands from the keyboard.

It also contains links to the complete latin and partial english (broken html?)
text of Donatus' _de tropis_.

>Do people teach these things to students, or do they leave them
>to the students to figure out? When do they teach them (at what
>level)?

Just from my own experience, I was never taught "rhetoric." I was introduced to
the tropes in a graduate level critical theory course, in the middle of a
discussion of the difference between metaphor and metonymy.  That sent me out
after a book or two, or else I'd have never known what paraprosdokian was (for
example).

I don't have them memorized, no.  It's what I have come to call "immersion
knowledge"; if I had the time to devote to it, I think I could keep the whole
catalogue "live" in my head at once.  I don't have that kind of time, though,
so I find that I tend to recall only the applicable poetic figures that I'm
likely to need daily.

>To put it more bluntly, HELP! I would love to hear some
>suggestions as to where I might turn, where I should direct my
>students...

If they have web access, point them to the page above; it's of web-length, but
fairly complete.  Certainly, it should be enough to grab the interest of those
of your students for whom rhetoric will be another "Wow!" tool in their
analytical and creative methods.

Best Regards,
paul

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nell Benjamin <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 12 Nov 1996 13:15:28 -0500
Subject: 7.0818 Re: Rhetorical Resources
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0818 Re: Rhetorical Resources

There used to be a book called "A Glossary of Literary Terms".  I do not
remember the author, but it had an amazing array of terms, including some of my
favorites: histeron proteron, tmesis, and zeugma.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.