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Home :: Archive :: 1996 :: November ::
Re: Twelfth Night Cross Casting
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, SHK 7.0824.  Wednesday, 13 November 1996.

(1)     From:   Nell Benjamin <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 12 Nov 1996 13:13:13 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0817 Re: Twelfth Night Cross Casting

(2)     From:   Eric Weil <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 12 Nov 1996 20:44:20 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0817 Re: Twelfth Night Cross Casting

(3)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 12 Nov 1996 22:05:15 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 7.0808  Re: Twelfth Night Cross Casting

(4)     From:   John Velz <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 13 Nov 1996 00:22:54 +0200
        Subj:   Women in Male Parts


(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nell Benjamin <
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Date:           Tuesday, 12 Nov 1996 13:13:13 -0500
Subject: 7.0817 Re: Twelfth Night Cross Casting
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0817 Re: Twelfth Night Cross Casting

I saw a very interesting production of Twelfth Night, in which there was only
one  male actor.  He played Orsino.  The director chose to focus on the play as
a competition between the characters for, not just love, but the love of a
member of the opposite sex. In this way, Olivia was not the only one confused
about sexual identity.  Occasionally, this conceit was  strained, but it did
shed some interesting light on the interactions between Antonio and Sebastian,
Viola and Sir Andrew, and Malvolio and Olivia.

(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Eric Weil <
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Date:           Tuesday, 12 Nov 1996 20:44:20 -0500
Subject: 7.0817 Re: Twelfth Night Cross Casting
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0817 Re: Twelfth Night Cross Casting

I seem to recall a story on NPR a couple of months ago about an all-female
acting company that is producing some of Shakespeare's plays.  But I don't
remember the name of the company (something like "Women Acting"?).

Hopefully, someone else can add more, but I suppose they would be a good
resource.

Good luck,
Eric Weil

(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Tuesday, 12 Nov 1996 22:05:15 -0500
Subject: 7.0808  Re: Twelfth Night Cross Casting
Comment:        Re: SHK 7.0808  Re: Twelfth Night Cross Casting

In the recent discussion of _Twelfth Night_, I was waiting for someone to
comment on Trevor Nunn's movie--with additions and rearrangements.  I saw the
movie last Saturday, and loved it.  I expect it will be much hated among
Shakespeare scholars, but I found Nunn's thematic rearrangements very well
done. Of course, there is no cross casting, but Sebastian does at one point
dress like his sister!

Yours, Bill Godshalk

(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <
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Date:           Wednesday, 13 Nov 1996 00:22:54 +0200
Subject:        Women in Male Parts

To add to the anecdotal evidence for androgynous (not androgenous, please)
roles in Shakespeare, the Duke of Venice was a very imposing Duchess of Venice
at Stratford Ontario last summer and Hymen was a white-haired woman (quite
matronly) in the last scene of *As You Like It* in RSC prod. in Stratford-upon-
Avon, also summer '96.  I have long ignored gender in non-amatory roles in
informal readings of Shakespeare in my home in Austin, TX; in *Twelfth Night*
Sunday 10 Nov. '96, Sir Andrew, Fabian, the priest, Curio, and Valentine were
all read by women.  In this reading Sarah Velz played both Sebastian and Viola,
which was fine until they faced each other volubly in Act V.

John Velz
 

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